Houston, TX, United States

NanoRidge Materials Inc.

www.nanoridge.com
Houston, TX, United States
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Davis D.C.,Texas A&M University | Wilkerson J.W.,Texas A&M University | Zhu J.,NanoRidge Materials Inc. | Hadjiev V.G.,University of Houston
Composites Science and Technology | Year: 2011

Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite laminates are studied for improvements in quasi static strength and stiffness and tension-tension fatigue cycling at stress-ratio (R-ratio) = +0.1 through strategically incorporating amine functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes (a-SWCNTs) at the fiber/fabric-matrix interfaces over the laminate cross-section. In a comparison to composite laminate material without carbon nanotube reinforcements there are modest improvements in the mechanical properties of strength and stiffness; but, a potentially significant increase is demonstrated for the long-term fatigue life of these functionalized nanotube reinforced composite materials. These results are compared with previous research on the cyclic life of this carbon fiber epoxy composite laminate system reinforced similarly with side wall fluorine functionalized industrial grade carbon nanotubes. Optical and scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectrometry are used to confirm the effectiveness of this strategy for the improvements in strength, stiffness and fatigue life of composite laminate materials using functionalized carbon nanotubes. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Davis D.C.,Texas A&M University | Wilkerson J.W.,Texas A&M University | Zhu J.,NanoRidge Materials Inc. | Ayewah D.O.O.,Texas A&M University
Composite Structures | Year: 2010

Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite laminates, with strategically incorporated fluorine functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs) at 0.2, 0.3 and 0.5. weight percent (wt.%), are studied for improvements in tensile strength and stiffness and durability under both tension-tension (R=+0.1) and tension-compression (R=-0.1) cyclic loadings, and then compared to the neat (0.0. wt.% CNTs) composite laminate material. To develop the nanocomposite laminates, a spraying technology was used to deposit nanotubes on both sides of each four-harness satin weave carbon fiber fabric piece for the 12 ply laminate lay up. For these experimental studies the carbon fiber reinforced epoxy laminates were fabricated using a heated vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (H-VARTM®) method followed by a 2 soak curing cycle. The f-CNTs toughened the epoxy resin-fiber interfaces to mitigate the evolution of fiber/fabric-matrix interfacial cracking and delamination under both static and cyclic loadings. As a consequence, significant improvements in the mechanical properties of tensile strength, stiffness and resistance to failure due to cyclic loadings resulted for this carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite laminate. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 224.99K | Year: 2014

This Small Business Technology Transfer Phase I project will substantially advance 1) approaches to combine carbon nanotubes (CNT) into metal matrices, 2) processes to convert copper/CNT composites into wire while preserving CNT integrity, 3) methods to induce CNT alignment during either nanocomposite production or extrusion in order to optimize electrical conductivity, and 4) process control to ensure that the technology can be scaled to industrially-relevant volumes. The largest challenge in this proposed research is understanding the role of CNT alignment as it pertains to electrical conductivity and controlling the alignment to produce the desired results. The research objectives seek to solve that challenge through inducing CNT alignment during the Cu/CNT production and also during the subsequent extrusion into wire. The anticipated results are 1) a Cu/CNT wire that exhibits an electrical resistivity of 1.30 x 10-6 Ohm.cm (100% IACS - 1.68 x 10-6 Ohm.cm) @ 20 deg C, and 2) a well-defined process that can consistently produce that performance at industrial volumes. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project includes the development of a copper conductor with superior electrical performance which will have significant commercial and societal value. Copper is the world?s most widely used electrical conductor, consuming approximately twenty-five billion pounds of copper annually. However, no significant improvement in the electrical performance of copper has been realized since the International Annealed Copper Standard (IACS) established the electrical resistivity to be 1.68 x 10-6 Ohm.cm in 1913. The benefits of an enhanced copper conductor will be most highly valued in applications requiring increased electrical conductivity, current capacity, thermal conductivity, and tensile strength. Key markets for early adoption of this technology include electrical transmission, electric motors, transformer windings, subsea oil and gas, electronics, and aerospace. In total, the estimated market potential for the Cu/CNT wire product enabled by this research is on the order of two billion pounds per year. It is for these reasons that the International Copper Association describes the output of this project as "an advanced copper-carbon nanocomposite material that would truly have a transformative effect on a broad area of technology and would be of immense benefit to society".


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.00K | Year: 2010

Carbon fibers are widely used in a variety of applications including aerospace, military and automotive. These applications are limited by the trade-offs that must be made between structural and conductive properties. A new area of interest is the nanotailoring of fibers with carbon nanotubes (CNT) to produce a high strength, high modulus light-weight carbon fiber that is thermally and/or electrically conductive. The significant difficulty in accomplishing this is the ability to fully and uniformly disperse CNTs into the precursor polymer. This issue has caused some previous efforts in this area to be unsuccessful with inconclusive results. To accomplish this task we have used ultra-short single-walled carbon nanotubes (US-SWNTs), to achieve a high level of dispersion in a carbon fiber polymer precursor. BENEFIT: The fiber technology proposed herein will have applications in DoD, NASA, and commercial industry including aerospace and infrastructure. The improved fiber performance, including mechanical and electrical properties, will provide opportunities for decreasing weight and decreased life cycle costs for the end user.


Carbon fibers made by a process using an organogel precursor that includes a nucleophilic filler and polyacrylonitrile; such a process which includes dry-jet wet spinning; and an article made from such carbon fibers.


Patent
NanoRidge Materials Inc. | Date: 2012-11-15

Electroplating systems and methods are provided that employ a structure for defining a zone of deposition for co-depositing metal and nanomaterial on a cathode. Materials that may be co-deposited include copper and carbon nanotubes Pulsed power may be employed to produce a more dimensionally uniform and/or more functionally uniform deposit.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 224.99K | Year: 2014

This Small Business Technology Transfer Phase I project will substantially advance 1) approaches to combine carbon nanotubes (CNT) into metal matrices, 2) processes to convert copper/CNT composites into wire while preserving CNT integrity, 3) methods to induce CNT alignment during either nanocomposite production or extrusion in order to optimize electrical conductivity, and 4) process control to ensure that the technology can be scaled to industrially-relevant volumes. The largest challenge in this proposed research is understanding the role of CNT alignment as it pertains to electrical conductivity and controlling the alignment to produce the desired results. The research objectives seek to solve that challenge through inducing CNT alignment during the Cu/CNT production and also during the subsequent extrusion into wire. The anticipated results are 1) a Cu/CNT wire that exhibits an electrical resistivity of 1.30 x 10-6 Ohm.cm (100% IACS - 1.68 x 10-6 Ohm.cm) @ 20 deg C, and 2) a well-defined process that can consistently produce that performance at industrial volumes.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project includes the development of a copper conductor with superior electrical performance which will have significant commercial and societal value. Copper is the world?s most widely used electrical conductor, consuming approximately twenty-five billion pounds of copper annually. However, no significant improvement in the electrical performance of copper has been realized since the International Annealed Copper Standard (IACS) established the electrical resistivity to be 1.68 x 10-6 Ohm.cm in 1913. The benefits of an enhanced copper conductor will be most highly valued in applications requiring increased electrical conductivity, current capacity, thermal conductivity, and tensile strength. Key markets for early adoption of this technology include electrical transmission, electric motors, transformer windings, subsea oil and gas, electronics, and aerospace. In total, the estimated market potential for the Cu/CNT wire product enabled by this research is on the order of two billion pounds per year. It is for these reasons that the International Copper Association describes the output of this project as an advanced copper-carbon nanocomposite material that would truly have a transformative effect on a broad area of technology and would be of immense benefit to society.


Kyle K.,NanoRidge Materials Inc.
JEC Composites Magazine | Year: 2015

A new nanotechnology-enhanced coating product from NanoRidge Materials Inc. is poised to change the way industries and consumers survive cold temperatures and protect equipment, fluids, and products from the damage and delays associated with freezing and static discharge. © 2015 Ashland AD-13070.


Trademark
NanoRidge Materials Inc. | Date: 2014-02-08

Apparatus consisting of a rheostat-type device connected to and delivering electrical current to nanotube-enhanced electro-thermal coating for controlling, regulating and conducting electric current for thermal dispersion evenly over the coated surface of equipment to which applied.


Trademark
NanoRidge Materials Inc. | Date: 2014-02-20

Apparatus consisting of a rheostat-type device connected to and delivering electrical current to nanotube-enhanced electro-thermal coating for controlling, regulating and conducting electric current for thermal dispersion evenly over the coated surface of equipment to which applied.

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