Nanomaterial Innovation Ltd.

Columbus, OH, United States

Nanomaterial Innovation Ltd.

Columbus, OH, United States

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Patent
Nanomaterial Innovation Ltd. | Date: 2011-04-28

The present invention discloses a CO_(2 )reservoir. The CO_(2 )reservoir comprises a functional conducting polymer and a plurality of particles. The particles are coated with the functional conducting polymer, and the particles comprise nanoscale or microscale particles and their mixture.


A facile method to produce covalently bonded graphene-like network coated on various solid substrates is disclosed in the present invention. According to one embodiment, a combination of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of carbon sources and a silicon compound with or without a metal containing compound under an inert gas flow is processed at high temperatures to produce covalent carbide bonding among graphene-like structures and between graphene-like structures and substrate surface.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 624.51K | Year: 2015

The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project is in significantly lowering the cost of high precision glass molding through a low-cost carbide-bonded graphene coating. In optical industry, optical glasses have been the de facto choice. These lenses are used in cameras, projection systems and military equipment. However, cost and other considerations frequently lead to the choice of injection molded plastic lenses with their acceptable but lower image quality. The innovative carbide-bonded graphene coatings are both low cost and durable, and could allow use of precision optical glasses in places where plastic products are used today. The coatings also have the potential to spread to other markets such as advanced thermal management, next generation electronic components, and biosensors based on the unique combination of excellent mechanical, physical, optical transparency and biocompatibility properties together with tunable optoelectronic characteristics. Such products may greatly improve our daily lives in areas such as portable electronics and optics, energy saving and green manufacturing. This project will further advance the chemically vapor deposited carbide-bonded graphene coating process demonstrated during Phase I that involved using silicon wafers with micro/nano-patterning. With the help of our industrial partners we now intend to scale the technology to the commercial level. The process development is targeted to developing low-cost and mass-producible high precision glass molding, micro-optics, and NIR aspheric optics for cell phones and high performance laser collimators. These activities would also enhance our understanding of carbide-bonded graphene coating technology.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 180.00K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project focuses on a novel carbide-bonded graphene coating technology to modify the surface of silicon wafer based molds through vacuum-assisted thermal exfoliation of functional graphene nanopaper. The graphene coating exhibits a unique combination of unprecedented properties such as lower surface friction coefficient and superior surface smoothness, higher hardness and wear resistance, better chemical resistance and anti-abrasion, lower thermal expansion coefficient and higher thermal conductivity comparing to silicon wafers and other coating materials. Using this new technology, the graphene coated silicon molds are able to produce high quality and high precision microlens and microlens array in advanced glass molding. Such products are difficult to produce in the current glass industry.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is that carbide-bonded graphene coating exhibits a unique combination of desired properties including excellent mechanical and bonding strength, high hardness, good electrical and thermal surface conductivities, low surface friction and excellent surface smoothness, strong chemical corrosion resistance and anti-abrasion, good cytocompatibility, easy micropatterning by cleanroom fabrication techniques, and attractive semiconductive and optoelectronic characteristics, thus opens up a new avenue toward engineering applications of graphenes. Microoptics have enormous applications in numerous fields, such as consumer electronics, sensors, optical communications, medical applications, light shaping, and energy. Currently, most low-cost microoptics products are based on plastic materials, which are commonly used in low-cost consumer electronics. However, plastic microoptics have many drawbacks, such as low reflective index, low light permeability, unstable to environmental changes, low hardness, etc. The replacement of plastic microoptics with low-cost precision glass microoptics is indispensable.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2011

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project aims to develop a layer-by-layer spray technology capable of integrating commercially-available nanoparticles, including multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNT), carbon nanofibers (CNF) and nanoclays into stable and strong nanopapers by electrostatic bonding, offering superior surface wear resistance and electrical conductivity properties at much lower cost and higher production rate than existing methods. The broader/commercial impact of this project will be the potential to provide light-weight, high-strength and low-cost nanopapers with superior Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) shielding capability and wear resistance. The nanopapers are expected to form strong bonding with the matrix resin such as epoxy. The resulting nanocomposite materials can be used as structural composites for a broad range of applications including aerospace industry, wind energy generators and so on.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project focuses on a novel carbide-bonded graphene coating technology to modify the surface of silicon wafer based molds through vacuum-assisted thermal exfoliation of functional graphene nanopaper. The graphene coating exhibits a unique combination of unprecedented properties such as lower surface friction coefficient and superior surface smoothness, higher hardness and wear resistance, better chemical resistance and anti-abrasion, lower thermal expansion coefficient and higher thermal conductivity comparing to silicon wafers and other coating materials. Using this new technology, the graphene coated silicon molds are able to produce high quality and high precision microlens and microlens array in advanced glass molding. Such products are difficult to produce in the current glass industry. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is that carbide-bonded graphene coating exhibits a unique combination of desired properties including excellent mechanical and bonding strength, high hardness, good electrical and thermal surface conductivities, low surface friction and excellent surface smoothness, strong chemical corrosion resistance and anti-abrasion, good cytocompatibility, easy micropatterning by cleanroom fabrication techniques, and attractive semiconductive and optoelectronic characteristics, thus opens up a new avenue toward engineering applications of graphenes. Microoptics have enormous applications in numerous fields, such as consumer electronics, sensors, optical communications, medical applications, light shaping, and energy. Currently, most low-cost microoptics products are based on plastic materials, which are commonly used in low-cost consumer electronics. However, plastic microoptics have many drawbacks, such as low reflective index, low light permeability, unstable to environmental changes, low hardness, etc. The replacement of plastic microoptics with low-cost precision glass microoptics is indispensable.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 180.00K | Year: 2011

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project aims to develop a layer-by-layer spray technology capable of integrating commercially-available nanoparticles, including multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNT), carbon nanofibers (CNF) and nanoclays into stable and strong nanopapers by electrostatic bonding, offering superior surface wear resistance and electrical conductivity properties at much lower cost and higher production rate than existing methods.

The broader/commercial impact of this project will be the potential to provide light-weight, high-strength and low-cost nanopapers with superior Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) shielding capability and wear resistance. The nanopapers are expected to form strong bonding with the matrix resin such as epoxy. The resulting nanocomposite materials can be used as structural composites for a broad range of applications including aerospace industry, wind energy generators and so on.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SMALL BUSINESS PHASE II | Award Amount: 624.51K | Year: 2015

The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project is in significantly lowering the cost of high precision glass molding through a low-cost carbide-bonded graphene coating. In optical industry, optical glasses have been the de facto choice. These lenses are used in cameras, projection systems and military equipment. However, cost and other considerations frequently lead to the choice of injection molded plastic lenses with their acceptable but lower image quality. The innovative carbide-bonded graphene coatings are both low cost and durable, and could allow use of precision optical glasses in places where plastic products are used today. The coatings also have the potential to spread to other markets such as advanced thermal management, next generation electronic components, and biosensors based on the unique combination of excellent mechanical, physical, optical transparency and biocompatibility properties together with tunable optoelectronic characteristics. Such products may greatly improve our daily lives in areas such as portable electronics and optics, energy saving and green manufacturing.


This project will further advance the chemically vapor deposited carbide-bonded graphene coating process demonstrated during Phase I that involved using silicon wafers with micro/nano-patterning. With the help of our industrial partners we now intend to scale the technology to the commercial level. The process development is targeted to developing low-cost and mass-producible high precision glass molding, micro-optics, and NIR aspheric optics for cell phones and high performance laser collimators. These activities would also enhance our understanding of carbide-bonded graphene coating technology.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 179.97K | Year: 2011

This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project seeks to develop a novel and sustainable approach to capture emitted CO2 from the fossil fuel based electric industry and convert the captured CO2 directly into useful by product, fertilizer using functionalized conducting polymer in a continuous dual chemical loop process. Reducing CO2 release to protect our environment is an urgent issue faced by our society, while world wide food shortage in the near future will require a lot amount of fertilizer. The objective of this project is to develop an affordable material/process that can quickly capture emitted CO2 from the industrial sources and turn it into fertilizer. We utilize functionalized polyaniline (FPAN), a low-cost material that can be reused repeatedly at harmful conditions, to capture CO2 at low temperature and high speed. With the presence of ammonia and water, the process can also easily convert CO2 into nitrogen fertilizers and allow the re-use of FPAN. If developed successfully, our process may permanently remove emitted CO2 and generate products valuable for agriculture, particularly food industry.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is to revolutionalize the current CO2 sequestration and storage approach. Turning environmentally harmful CO2 release into useful fertilizer production in a low-temperature and low-cost process represents a great commercialization opportunity in both green energy and food industries in the US and worldwide. The low-cost fertilizer produced from CO2 release may also impact the forest and biomass industry. Furthermore, this will significantly grow the overall share of functional materials in the industry. Successful commercialization of the proposed novel products will have a significant impact on global warming, environmental protection and energy generation. This award will enhance the United States global leadership position in green industry. Societal benefits include healthier living environment and improved use of conventional fossil fuels that contribute to global warming. Educational and scientific benefits relate to the pioneering nature of nanocomposite technology and the opportunity this project will provide to advance frontiers of knowledge and the training of future scientists.


The present invention disclosed a method of fabricating an antibody immunolipoplex nanoparticle (Ab-ILN) biochip and antibody tethered lipoplex nanoparticle (Ab-TLN) biochip. The aforementioned antibody-based lipoplex nanoparticle biochip or the related array contains molecular probes and is applied for detecting the presence of a disease or condition in a subject obtaining a body fluid sample by capturing and identifying both membrane protein and intra-vesicular DNA/RNA/proteins of extracellular vesicles (EVs).

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