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Columbus, OH, United States

Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 200.00K | Year: 2010

This project will investigate transferrin (Tf) conjugated fluorescent nanoparticles loaded with an siRNA, LOR-1284, as a theranostic agent for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). LOR-1284, a siRNA targeting the R2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), is a promising agent for overcoming RNR-mediated drug resistance in AML. The nanoparticles are designed to facilitate LOR-1284 delivery to AML cells (for therapy) while enabling easy detection of delivery efficiency to the AML cells in leukemia patients (for diagnosis). A novel microfluidic method has been developed for nanoparticle synthesis. This project will be carried out by a multidisciplinary team of investigators at NIL and at The Ohio State University.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 624.51K | Year: 2015

The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project is in significantly lowering the cost of high precision glass molding through a low-cost carbide-bonded graphene coating. In optical industry, optical glasses have been the de facto choice. These lenses are used in cameras, projection systems and military equipment. However, cost and other considerations frequently lead to the choice of injection molded plastic lenses with their acceptable but lower image quality. The innovative carbide-bonded graphene coatings are both low cost and durable, and could allow use of precision optical glasses in places where plastic products are used today. The coatings also have the potential to spread to other markets such as advanced thermal management, next generation electronic components, and biosensors based on the unique combination of excellent mechanical, physical, optical transparency and biocompatibility properties together with tunable optoelectronic characteristics. Such products may greatly improve our daily lives in areas such as portable electronics and optics, energy saving and green manufacturing. This project will further advance the chemically vapor deposited carbide-bonded graphene coating process demonstrated during Phase I that involved using silicon wafers with micro/nano-patterning. With the help of our industrial partners we now intend to scale the technology to the commercial level. The process development is targeted to developing low-cost and mass-producible high precision glass molding, micro-optics, and NIR aspheric optics for cell phones and high performance laser collimators. These activities would also enhance our understanding of carbide-bonded graphene coating technology.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 180.00K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project focuses on a novel carbide-bonded graphene coating technology to modify the surface of silicon wafer based molds through vacuum-assisted thermal exfoliation of functional graphene nanopaper. The graphene coating exhibits a unique combination of unprecedented properties such as lower surface friction coefficient and superior surface smoothness, higher hardness and wear resistance, better chemical resistance and anti-abrasion, lower thermal expansion coefficient and higher thermal conductivity comparing to silicon wafers and other coating materials. Using this new technology, the graphene coated silicon molds are able to produce high quality and high precision microlens and microlens array in advanced glass molding. Such products are difficult to produce in the current glass industry.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is that carbide-bonded graphene coating exhibits a unique combination of desired properties including excellent mechanical and bonding strength, high hardness, good electrical and thermal surface conductivities, low surface friction and excellent surface smoothness, strong chemical corrosion resistance and anti-abrasion, good cytocompatibility, easy micropatterning by cleanroom fabrication techniques, and attractive semiconductive and optoelectronic characteristics, thus opens up a new avenue toward engineering applications of graphenes. Microoptics have enormous applications in numerous fields, such as consumer electronics, sensors, optical communications, medical applications, light shaping, and energy. Currently, most low-cost microoptics products are based on plastic materials, which are commonly used in low-cost consumer electronics. However, plastic microoptics have many drawbacks, such as low reflective index, low light permeability, unstable to environmental changes, low hardness, etc. The replacement of plastic microoptics with low-cost precision glass microoptics is indispensable.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SMALL BUSINESS PHASE II | Award Amount: 624.51K | Year: 2015

The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project is in significantly lowering the cost of high precision glass molding through a low-cost carbide-bonded graphene coating. In optical industry, optical glasses have been the de facto choice. These lenses are used in cameras, projection systems and military equipment. However, cost and other considerations frequently lead to the choice of injection molded plastic lenses with their acceptable but lower image quality. The innovative carbide-bonded graphene coatings are both low cost and durable, and could allow use of precision optical glasses in places where plastic products are used today. The coatings also have the potential to spread to other markets such as advanced thermal management, next generation electronic components, and biosensors based on the unique combination of excellent mechanical, physical, optical transparency and biocompatibility properties together with tunable optoelectronic characteristics. Such products may greatly improve our daily lives in areas such as portable electronics and optics, energy saving and green manufacturing.


This project will further advance the chemically vapor deposited carbide-bonded graphene coating process demonstrated during Phase I that involved using silicon wafers with micro/nano-patterning. With the help of our industrial partners we now intend to scale the technology to the commercial level. The process development is targeted to developing low-cost and mass-producible high precision glass molding, micro-optics, and NIR aspheric optics for cell phones and high performance laser collimators. These activities would also enhance our understanding of carbide-bonded graphene coating technology.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2011

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project aims to develop a layer-by-layer spray technology capable of integrating commercially-available nanoparticles, including multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNT), carbon nanofibers (CNF) and nanoclays into stable and strong nanopapers by electrostatic bonding, offering superior surface wear resistance and electrical conductivity properties at much lower cost and higher production rate than existing methods. The broader/commercial impact of this project will be the potential to provide light-weight, high-strength and low-cost nanopapers with superior Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) shielding capability and wear resistance. The nanopapers are expected to form strong bonding with the matrix resin such as epoxy. The resulting nanocomposite materials can be used as structural composites for a broad range of applications including aerospace industry, wind energy generators and so on.

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