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San Diego, CA, United States

Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.00M | Year: 2011

A Single Cell time-of-flight Mass Spectrometer (SCMS) that is enabled by the use of a nanoparticle based MALDI matrix will be fabricated and tested. Unlike traditional surface-receptor-based cell phenotyping and identification techniques, the SCMS system will be able to differentiate between cell types that are indistinguishable using traditional antibody based methods. The label-free method will provide molecular information on individual cells that will lead to a new understanding of the molecular variance in heterogeneous cell mixtures. Another mode of operation allows for the use of either fluorescent, nanoparticle or elemental tags (e.g. lanthanides), to provide a highly multi-plexed labeling method using the single cell mass spectrometer as the detector. The SCMS will also have the capability to be coupled to a cytometer which can be used to isolate cell populations of interest prior to mass spectrometry analysis. Here, cell populations labeled with a fluorescent antibody can be further analyzed to measure the variance and identify sub-populations within the tagged cells.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Defense Health Program | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2015

Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease in North America and one of the fast-growing infectious diseases in the United States. An inexpensive, portable and accurate diagnostic device for the detection of Borrelia bacteria in the deer tick will be developed. The diagnostic device will consist of an efficient extractor for disrupting the hard exoskeleton on the tick, an ultra-sensitive lateral flow based detection assay and a cell phone reader attachment for quantifying and geotagging the test strip results. The detection kit will have a small form factor, will be simple to use and will require minimal power.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.00K | Year: 2012

Pyrotechnic and pyrophoric IR decoy flares protect military aircraft from IR seeking surface-to-air missiles by closely mimicking the electromagnetic signature of the aircraft in order to divert the missile from its target. Pyrophoric based decoys have advantages over pyrotechnic technology in that they are more covert, are less likely to start fires, and produce a spectral signature that is more effective against dual spectral seeking MANPADs. During Phase I we demonstrated a nanoparticle based IR decoy that rapidly generated relevant apparent temperatures when exposed to air. During the Phase II the nanoparticles will be optimized to maximize radiant output. Full devices will be assembled and tests will be conducted to compare performance with current Raney metal foil technology.


Patent
Nanocomposix, Inc. | Date: 2015-12-18

Embodiments of the present invention relate to methods for preparing high optical density solutions of nanoplates, such as silver nanoplates or silver platelet nanoparticles, and to nanoparticles, solutions and substrates prepared by said methods. The process can include the addition of stabilizing agents (e.g., chemical or biological agents bound or otherwise linked to the nanoparticle surface) that stabilize the nanoparticle before, during, and/or after concentration, thereby allowing for the production of a stable, high optical density solution of silver nanoplates. The process can also include increasing the concentration of silver nanoplates within the solution, and thus increasing the solution optical density.


Patent
Nanocomposix, Inc. and Sienna Labs Inc. | Date: 2015-04-08

Embodiments of the present invention relate to methods for preparing high optical density solutions of nanoparticle, such as nanoplates, silver nanoplates or silver platelet nanoparticles, and to the solutions and substrates prepared by the methods. The process can include the addition of stabilizing agents (e.g., chemical or biological agents bound or otherwise linked to the nanoparticle surface) that stabilize the nanoparticle before, during, and/or after concentration, thereby allowing for the production of a stable, high optical density solution of silver nanoplates. The process can also include increasing the concentration of silver nanoplates within the solution, and thus increasing the solution optical density.

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