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Bhaskar A.,Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad | Deepa M.,Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad | Rao T.N.,Nanocenter
Electrochimica Acta | Year: 2015

A scalable one-pot solvothermal route is presented for preparing tin disulfide (SnS2) nanosheets and nanoflowers. Urea, mercapto propionic acid as an organic additive, steers the growth of SnS2 nanosheets and thiourea (TU) orchestrates the formation hierarchical SnS2 nanoflowers. A time dependent experiment reveals the following growth mechanism: from SnO2 with a tetragonal rutile structure (1 h), to SnS2 nanosheets and nanoflowers with a hexagonal crystal structure (12 h). When SnS2 nanosheets and nanoflowers are incorporated into Li-ion battery half cells, both nanostructures exhibit excellent capacity retention and rate capability. SnS2 nanoflowers and nanosheets retained a capacity of 466 and 196 mAh g-1 even at very high current density of 3000 mA g-1 after 65 cycles. The outstanding reversible Li-ion storage responses and the visible blue-green photoluminescence shown by SnS2 nanosheets and nanoflowers are prime indicators of the potential these nanostructures have for not just energy storage and but also for energy harvesting applications. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Source


Vartiainen J.,VTT Technical Research Center of Finland | Pohler T.,VTT Technical Research Center of Finland | Sirola K.,Finnish Institute of Occupational Health | Pylkkanen L.,Finnish Institute of Occupational Health | And 10 more authors.
NANOCON 2011 - Conference Proceedings, 3rd International Conference | Year: 2011

Nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) is one of the most promising innovations for forest sector. NFC is produced by fibrillating the fibres under high compression and shear forces. In this study we evaluated the worker exposures to particles in air during grinding and spray drying of birch cellulose. Processing of NFC with either a friction grinder or a spray dryer did not cause significant exposure to particles during normal operation. Grinding generated small amount of particles, which were mostly removed by fume hood. Spray dryer leaked particles when duct valve was closed, but when correctly operated the exposure to particles was low or nonexistent. To assess the health effects of the produced NFC, mouse macrophages and human monocyte derived macrophages were exposed to NFC and the viability and cytokine profile of the cells were studied thereafter. No evidence of inflammatory effects or cytotoxicity on mouse and human macrophages was observed after 6 and 24 hours exposure to the materials studied. The results of toxicity studies suggest that the friction ground NFC is not cytotoxic and does not cause any effects on inflammatory system in macrophages. In addition, environmental safety of NFC was studied with ecotoxicity test. Acute environmental toxicity assessed with kinetic luminescent bacteria test showed high NOEC (no effect concentration) values (>100 mg/l) for studied NFC. However, NFC disturbed Daphnia magna mobility mechanically when the test was performed according to the standard procedure. © 2011 TANGER Ltd., Ostrava. Source


Bhaskar A.,Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad | Deepa M.,Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad | Rao T.N.,Nanocenter
Nanoscale | Year: 2014

Tin oxide hollow spheres (SnO2 HS) with high structural integrity were synthesized by using a one pot hydrothermal approach with organic moieties as structure controlling agents. By adjusting the proportion of acetylacetone (AcAc) in the precursor formulation, SnO2 HS of 200 and 350 nm dimensions, with a uniform shell thickness of about 50 nm, were prepared. Using the optimized solution composition with a Sn precursor, heating duration dependent structural evolution of SnO2 was performed at a fixed temperature of 160°C, which revealed a transition from solid spheres (1 h) to aggregated spheres (4 h) to porous spheres (10 h) to optimized HS (13 h) and finally to broken enlarged HS (24 h). A heating temperature dependent study carried out with a constant heating span of 13 h showed a metamorphosis from spheres with solid cores (140°C) to ones with hollow cores (160°C), culminating with fragmented HS, expanded in dimensions (180°C). A growth mechanism was proposed for the optimized SnO2 HS (2.5 or 5.0 mL of AcAc, 160°C, 13 h) and the performance of these HS as anodes for Li ions batteries was evaluated by electrochemical studies. The 200 nm SnO2 HS demonstrated an initial lithium storage capacity of 1055 mA h g-1 at a current density of 100 mA g-1, and they retained a capacity of 540 mA h g-1 after 50 charge-discharge cycles. The SnO2 HS also showed excellent rate capability as the electrode exhibited a capacity of 422 mA h g-1 even at a high current density of 2000 mA g -1. The notable capacity of SnO2 HS is a manifestation of the mono-disperse quality of the SnO2 HS coupled with the high number of electrochemically addressable sites, afforded by the large surface area of the HS and the striking cyclability is also attributed to the unique structure of HS, which is resistant to degradation upon repeated ion insertion/extraction. The SnO2 HS were also found to be luminescent, thus indicating their usefulness for not only energy storage but also for energy harvesting applications. © the Partner Organisations 2014. Source


Vartiainen J.,VTT Technical Research Center of Finland | Pohler T.,VTT Technical Research Center of Finland | Sirola K.,Finnish Institute of Occupational Health | Pylkkanen L.,Finnish Institute of Occupational Health | And 10 more authors.
Cellulose | Year: 2011

Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC), also referred to as nanocellulose, is one of the most promising innovations for forest sector. MFC is produced by fibrillating the fibres under high compression and shear forces. In this study we evaluated the worker exposures to particles in air during grinding and spray drying of birch cellulose. Processing of MFC with either a friction grinder or a spray dryer did not cause significant exposure to particles during normal operation. Grinding generated small amount of particles, which were mostly removed by fume hood. Spray dryer leaked particles when duct valve was closed, but when correctly operated the exposure to particles was low or nonexistent. To assess the health effects of the produced MFC, mouse macrophages and human monocyte derived macrophages were exposed to MFC and the viability and cytokine profile of the cells were studied thereafter. No evidence of inflammatory effects or cytotoxicity on mouse and human macrophages was observed after 6 and 24 h exposure to the materials studied. The results of toxicity studies suggest that the friction ground MFC is not cytotoxic and does not cause any effects on inflammatory system in macrophages. In addition, environmental safety of MFC was studied with ecotoxicity test. Acute environmental toxicity assessed with kinetic luminescent bacteria test showed high NOEC values (>100 mg/l) for studied MFC. However, MFC disturbed Daphnia magna mobility mechanically when the test was performed according to the standard procedure. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. Source


Home > Press > Thousands Visit SUNY Polytechnic Institute Sites in Albany, Utica, and Rochester for Annual Community Day Activities: Signature ‘NANOvember’ event highlights New York State’s pioneering nanotechnology-centered corridor as part of the eighth annual month-long celebration Abstract: Demonstrating extensive and sustained interest in Governor Andrew M. Cuomo’s high-tech investment strategy which has made New York State a global leader in technology innovation, SUNY Polytechnic Institute announced that thousands attended Community Day events at its locations in Albany, Utica, and Rochester, representing a ten percent increase from last year’s Community Day attendance. The eighth annual event featured 160 faculty, staff, and student volunteers in total supporting the traditional start to “NANOvember,” a month-long series of statewide engagements that demonstrate the inspiring world of nanotechnology and the global leadership of SUNY Poly and New York in this exciting field. "SUNY Poly’s Community Day is an engaging event that serves growing public interest in the nanosciences as well as the educational opportunities and career prospects the field presents," said SUNY Chancellor Nancy L. Zimpher. "As in years past, Community Day has been a sweeping success, highlighting the many opportunities that SUNY Poly makes available for students, faculty, staff, and businesses. Congratulations to Dr. Kaloyeros and the entire SUNY Poly community on this event.” “SUNY Polytechnic Institute is thrilled to offer these “NANOvember” events and share the story of Governor Andrew Cuomo’s successful public-private investment model, which has catalyzed billions of dollars in investment across New York State and thousands of jobs, with SUNY Poly as a magnet for leading businesses that have made New York’s innovation ecosystem their home,” said SUNY Poly President and CEO Dr. Alain Kaloyeros. “As people of all ages take part in NANOvember-themed events throughout this month, we hope that they will be inspired and excited by how the Governor’s nanotechnology-centered economic strategy is powering exciting growth and development.” At SUNY Polytechnic Institute’s $24 billion Albany NanoTech Complex, Community Day featured a wide range of family-friendly activities, allowing visitors to explore vanishing jelly marbles, the principles of levitation, and take part in gowning demonstrations, fabricate Buckyballs, create play dough, and make bouncing balls. Attendees were provided guided tours of NanoFab Xtension (NFX), headquarters for the Global 450mm Consortium (G450C), which is leading the world in the development of next-generation computer chips, to see first-hand the powerful educational and workforce opportunities that stem from Governor Cuomo’s targeted investments across the state. The Albany event was accompanied by a similar event held simultaneously at SUNY Poly’s Utica site, where visitors learned about Governor Cuomo’s $1.5 billion ‘Nano Utica’ announcement. Attendees were able to tour the Computer Chip Commercialization Center (Quad-C), which will be home to a power electronics packaging facility led by SUNY Poly and GE. They also learned about sensor maker ams’ $2 billion Marcy Nanocenter plans that will establish a state-of-the-art 200/300 mm wafer fabrication facility to support the company’s high-performance analog semiconductor operations which are expected to create and retain more than 700 full time jobs and 500 additional support jobs. Visitors to SUNY Poly’s Utica site were also able to take part in a number of fun, hands-on nanotechnology-based activities and presentations to better understand the science behind regional and statewide nano-based growth. As part of the kickoff to NANOvember, students from the Finger Lakes region were also invited to tour the SUNY Poly Smart System Technology & Commercialization Center (SUNY Poly STC) in Canandaigua on November 6 to see demonstrations of the facility’s world-class micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) capabilities to better understand numerous career opportunities that are available to them. Students from Pittsford Mendon High School and Pittsford Sutherland High School attended the nanoscience-focused, daylong event. NANOvember will continue with The Entrepreneurship Forum, hosted by SUNY Poly and the Energy and Environmental Technology Applications Center (E2TAC), which will provide critical information and valuable connections for startup businesses, enabling them to connect with client companies and advisory members of Incubators for Collaborating & Leveraging Energy and Nanotechnology (iCLEAN) and the Tech Valley Business Incubator on November 12; “SUNY Poly CMOST Family Day” at the SUNY Poly Children’s Museum of Science and Technology (SUNY Poly CMOST), where children will be able to experience age-appropriate nanotechnology exhibits and other engaging, family-based activities that will allow them to explore the science behind Star Wars on November 14; and 300 middle and high school students will take part in an immersive nanotechnology-inspired program as part of SUNY Poly’s popular “NanoCareer Day,” where attendees learn about the many high-tech career opportunities available throughout New York’s high-tech corridor on November 25. Additionally, “An Evening of Q & A with Dr. Alain Kaloyeros, SUNY Poly President and CEO,” is scheduled to take place at the SUNY Poly Albany site on November 16 when he will discuss nanotechnology’s growing impact on New York State—and societies around the globe—as a result of Governor Cuomo’s high-tech growth strategy. For a complete list of events and activities planned for NANOvember, along with pre-registration, please visit www.sunycnse.com/NANOvember.aspx. About SUNY Polytechnic Institute SUNY Polytechnic Institute (SUNY Poly) is New York’s globally recognized, high-tech educational ecosystem, formed from the merger of the SUNY College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering and SUNY Institute of Technology. SUNY Poly offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in the emerging disciplines of nanoscience and nanoengineering, as well as cutting-edge nanobioscience and nanoeconomics programs at its Albany location and undergraduate and graduate degrees in technology, including engineering, cybersecurity, computer science, and the engineering technologies; professional studies, including business, communication, and nursing; and arts and sciences, including natural sciences, mathematics, humanities, and social sciences at its Utica/Rome location. Thriving athletic, recreational, and cultural programs, events, and activities complement the campus experience. As the world’s most advanced, university-driven research enterprise, SUNY Poly boasts more than $43 billion in high-tech investments, over 300 corporate partners, and maintains a statewide footprint. The 1.3 million-square-foot Albany NanoTech megaplex is home to more than 4,000 scientists, researchers, engineers, students, faculty, and staff, in addition to Tech Valley High School. SUNY Poly operates the Smart Cities Technology Innovation Center (SCiTI) at Kiernan Plaza in Albany, the Solar Energy Development Center in Halfmoon, the Children’s Museum of Science and Technology (CMOST) in Troy, the Central New York Hub for Emerging Nano Industries in Syracuse, the Smart System Technology and Commercialization Center (STC) in Canandaigua, and the Photovoltaic Manufacturing and Technology Development Facility in Rochester where SUNY Poly also leads the American Institute for Manufacturing Integrated Photonics. SUNY Poly founded and manages the Computer Chip Commercialization Center (Quad-C) at its Utica location and also manages the $500 million New York Power Electronics Manufacturing Consortium, with nodes in Albany and Rochester, as well as the Buffalo High-Tech Manufacturing Innovation Hub at RiverBend, Buffalo Information Technologies Innovation and Commercialization Hub, and Buffalo Medical Innovation and Commercialization Hub. For information visit www.sunycnse.com and www.sunypoly.edu. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

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