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Nano-Meta Technologies, Inc.

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West Lafayette, IN, United States

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Guler U.,Nano-Meta Technologies, Inc. | Kildishev A.V.,Nano-Meta Technologies, Inc. | Kildishev A.V.,Purdue University | Boltasseva A.,Nano-Meta Technologies, Inc. | And 3 more authors.
Faraday Discussions | Year: 2015

The key problem currently faced by plasmonics is related to material limitations. After almost two decades of extreme excitement and research largely based on the use of noble metals, scientists have come to a consensus on the importance of exploring alternative plasmonic materials to address application-specific challenges to enable the development of new functional devices. Such a change in motivation will undoubtedly lead to significant advancements in plasmonics technology transfer and could have a revolutionary impact on nanophotonic technologies in general. Here, we report on one of the approaches that, together with other new material platforms, mark an insightful technology-driven era for plasmonics. Our study focuses on transition metal nitrides as refractory plasmonic materials that exhibit appealing optical properties in the visible and near infrared regions, along with high temperature durability. We take heat-assisted magnetic recording as a case study for plasmonic technology and show that a titanium nitride antenna satisfies the requirements for an optically efficient, durable near field transducer paving the way to the next-generation data recording systems. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Reddy H.,Purdue University | Guler U.,Nano-Meta Technologies, Inc. | Kildishev A.V.,Purdue University | Kildishev A.V.,Nano-Meta Technologies, Inc. | And 4 more authors.
Optical Materials Express | Year: 2016

Understanding the temperature dependence of the optical properties of thin metal films is critical for designing practical devices for high temperature applications in a variety of research areas, including plasmonics and near-field radiative heat transfer. Even though the optical properties of bulk metals at elevated temperatures have been studied, the temperature-dependent data for thin metal films, with thicknesses ranging from few tens to few hundreds of nanometers, is largely missing. In this work we report on the optical constants of single- and polycrystalline gold thin films at elevated temperatures in the wavelength range from 370 to 2000 nm. Our results show that while the real part of the dielectric function changes marginally with increasing temperature, the imaginary part changes drastically. For 200-nm-thick single- and polycrystalline gold films the imaginary part of the dielectric function at 500 °C becomes nearly twice larger than that at room temperature. In contrast, in thinner films (50-nm and 30-nm) the imaginary part can show either increasing or decreasing behavior within the same temperature range and eventually at 500 °C it becomes nearly 3-4 times larger than that at room temperature. The increase in the imaginary part at elevated temperatures significantly reduces the surface plasmon polariton propagation length and the quality factor of the localized surface plasmon resonance for a spherical particle. We provide experiment-fitted models to describe the temperature-dependent gold dielectric function as a sum of one Drude and two critical point oscillators. These causal analytical models could enable accurate multiphysics modelling of gold-based nanophotonic and plasmonic elements in both frequency and time domains. © 2016 Optical Society of America.


Herzing A.A.,U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology | Guler U.,Purdue University | Guler U.,Nano-Meta Technologies, Inc. | Zhou X.,University of Michigan | And 3 more authors.
Applied Physics Letters | Year: 2016

The plasmon resonance characteristics of refractory TiN thin films were analyzed using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). A bulk plasmon resonance was observed at 2.81 eV and a weaker surface plasmon resonance peak was detected at 2.05 eV. These findings are compared to finite-difference time-domain simulations based on measured optical data. The calculated values for both the bulk and surface resonances (2.74 eV and 2.15 eV, respectively) show reasonable agreement with those measured via EELS. The amplitude of the experimentally observed surface resonance was weaker than that typically encountered in noble metal nanostructures, and this is discussed in the context of electron density and reduced spatial confinement of the resonance mode in the thin-film geometry. © 2016 Author(s).


Guler U.,Purdue University | Guler U.,Nano-Meta Technologies, Inc. | Suslov S.,Purdue University | Kildishev A.V.,Purdue University | And 6 more authors.
Nanophotonics | Year: 2015

Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal and photocatalytic applications via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm, which was found to be the optimum size for cellular uptake with gold nanoparticles [1], exhibit plasmon resonance in the biological transparency window and demonstrate a high absorption efficiency. A self-passivating native oxide at the surface of the nanoparticles provides an additional degree of freedom for surface functionalization. The titanium oxide shell surrounding the plasmonic core can create new opportunities for photocatalytic applications. © 2015 V. M. Shalaev et al., licensee De Gruyter Open.


Shalaginov M.Y.,Purdue University | Naik G.V.,Purdue University | Ishii S.,Purdue University | Slipchenko M.N.,Purdue University | And 5 more authors.
Applied Physics B: Lasers and Optics | Year: 2011

Several different types of nanodiamonds were characterized in order to find the best sample to be used in further experiments with metamaterials. In this work we present the results of optical analysis of aqueous suspensions containing nanodiamonds, SEM analysis of diamond particles dispersed on silicon substrates and measurements of photoluminescence from defects in nanodiamonds. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.


Liu J.,Purdue University | Guler U.,Nano-Meta Technologies, Inc. | Lagutchev A.,Purdue University | Kildishev A.,Purdue University | And 4 more authors.
Optical Materials Express | Year: 2015

The thermal emission of refractory plasmonic metamaterial - a titanium nitride 1D grating - is studied at high operating temperature (540 °C). By choosing a refractory material, we fabricate thermal gratings with high brightness that are emitting mid-infrared radiation centered around 3 μm. We demonstrate experimentally that the thermal excitation of plasmon-polariton on the surface of the grating produces a well-collimated beam with a spatial coherence length of 32λ (angular divergence of 1.8°) which is quasi-monochromatic with a full width at half maximum of 70 nm. These experimental results show good agreement with a numerical model based on a two-dimensional full-wave analysis in frequency domain. © 2015 Optical Society of America.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.72K | Year: 2014

The broader impacts/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project are to enable ultra-high capacity disk drives. The explosion of global digital data and the need to store it is continuing to drive demand for disk storage. Approximately 550 million drives are sold each year with a value of about $35B. The greater storage densities created by heat assisted magnetic recording will drive down the cost of storage per Terabyte and greatly reduce the physical and thermal footprints in data centers. A 10X greater drive capacity translates to an approximate 90% reduction in the number of drives required for any given storage requirement. This will greatly reduce facility utility costs and emissions associated with housing, powering and cooling data centers. This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project aims to solve critical issues in heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) technology for next-generation of ultra-high capacity disk drives. High data storage densities achievable with HAMR technology are expected to radically improve drive storage capacities through much greater densities. However, durable near field transducers (NFTs) are critical components that must be realized before commercialization of the devices is possible. Plasmonic materials with refractory properties are natural candidates for durable NFTs. In-depth comprehensive understanding of the connection between thermal cyclic load, oxidation, stoichiometry, crystalline structure and plasmonic properties for the plasmonic ceramics at nanoscale requires sufficient scientific and experimental support. Numerical simulations, optical characterization and advanced electron microscopy techniques will be employed to investigate the performance of plasmonic ceramics with refractory properties as reliable NFTs for HAMR technology.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 179.40K | Year: 2014

The broader impacts/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project are to enable ultra-high capacity disk drives. The explosion of global digital data and the need to store it is continuing to drive demand for disk storage. Approximately 550 million drives are sold each year with a value of about $35B. The greater storage densities created by heat assisted magnetic recording will drive down the cost of storage per Terabyte and greatly reduce the physical and thermal footprints in data centers. A 10X greater drive capacity translates to an approximate 90% reduction in the number of drives required for any given storage requirement. This will greatly reduce facility utility costs and emissions associated with housing, powering and cooling data centers.

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project aims to solve critical issues in heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) technology for next-generation of ultra-high capacity disk drives. High data storage densities achievable with HAMR technology are expected to radically improve drive storage capacities through much greater densities. However, durable near field transducers (NFTs) are critical components that must be realized before commercialization of the devices is possible. Plasmonic materials with refractory properties are natural candidates for durable NFTs. In-depth comprehensive understanding of the connection between thermal cyclic load, oxidation, stoichiometry, crystalline structure and plasmonic properties for the plasmonic ceramics at nanoscale requires sufficient scientific and experimental support. Numerical simulations, optical characterization and advanced electron microscopy techniques will be employed to investigate the performance of plasmonic ceramics with refractory properties as reliable NFTs for HAMR technology.


PubMed | Nano-Meta Technologies, Inc.
Type: | Journal: Faraday discussions | Year: 2015

The key problem currently faced by plasmonics is related to material limitations. After almost two decades of extreme excitement and research largely based on the use of noble metals, scientists have come to a consensus on the importance of exploring alternative plasmonic materials to address application-specific challenges to enable the development of new functional devices. Such a change in motivation will undoubtedly lead to significant advancements in plasmonics technology transfer and could have a revolutionary impact on nanophotonic technologies in general. Here, we report on one of the approaches that, together with other new material platforms, mark an insightful technology-driven era for plasmonics. Our study focuses on transition metal nitrides as refractory plasmonic materials that exhibit appealing optical properties in the visible and near infrared regions, along with high temperature durability. We take heat-assisted magnetic recording as a case study for plasmonic technology and show that a titanium nitride antenna satisfies the requirements for an optically efficient, durable near field transducer paving the way to the next-generation data recording systems.

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