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West Lafayette, IN, United States

Herzing A.A.,U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology | Guler U.,Purdue University | Guler U.,Nano-Meta Technologies, Inc. | Zhou X.,University of Michigan | And 3 more authors.
Applied Physics Letters | Year: 2016

The plasmon resonance characteristics of refractory TiN thin films were analyzed using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). A bulk plasmon resonance was observed at 2.81 eV and a weaker surface plasmon resonance peak was detected at 2.05 eV. These findings are compared to finite-difference time-domain simulations based on measured optical data. The calculated values for both the bulk and surface resonances (2.74 eV and 2.15 eV, respectively) show reasonable agreement with those measured via EELS. The amplitude of the experimentally observed surface resonance was weaker than that typically encountered in noble metal nanostructures, and this is discussed in the context of electron density and reduced spatial confinement of the resonance mode in the thin-film geometry. © 2016 Author(s). Source


Liu J.,Purdue University | Guler U.,Nano-Meta Technologies, Inc. | Lagutchev A.,Purdue University | Kildishev A.,Purdue University | And 4 more authors.
Optical Materials Express | Year: 2015

The thermal emission of refractory plasmonic metamaterial - a titanium nitride 1D grating - is studied at high operating temperature (540 °C). By choosing a refractory material, we fabricate thermal gratings with high brightness that are emitting mid-infrared radiation centered around 3 μm. We demonstrate experimentally that the thermal excitation of plasmon-polariton on the surface of the grating produces a well-collimated beam with a spatial coherence length of 32λ (angular divergence of 1.8°) which is quasi-monochromatic with a full width at half maximum of 70 nm. These experimental results show good agreement with a numerical model based on a two-dimensional full-wave analysis in frequency domain. © 2015 Optical Society of America. Source


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.72K | Year: 2014

The broader impacts/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project are to enable ultra-high capacity disk drives. The explosion of global digital data and the need to store it is continuing to drive demand for disk storage. Approximately 550 million drives are sold each year with a value of about $35B. The greater storage densities created by heat assisted magnetic recording will drive down the cost of storage per Terabyte and greatly reduce the physical and thermal footprints in data centers. A 10X greater drive capacity translates to an approximate 90% reduction in the number of drives required for any given storage requirement. This will greatly reduce facility utility costs and emissions associated with housing, powering and cooling data centers. This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project aims to solve critical issues in heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) technology for next-generation of ultra-high capacity disk drives. High data storage densities achievable with HAMR technology are expected to radically improve drive storage capacities through much greater densities. However, durable near field transducers (NFTs) are critical components that must be realized before commercialization of the devices is possible. Plasmonic materials with refractory properties are natural candidates for durable NFTs. In-depth comprehensive understanding of the connection between thermal cyclic load, oxidation, stoichiometry, crystalline structure and plasmonic properties for the plasmonic ceramics at nanoscale requires sufficient scientific and experimental support. Numerical simulations, optical characterization and advanced electron microscopy techniques will be employed to investigate the performance of plasmonic ceramics with refractory properties as reliable NFTs for HAMR technology.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 179.40K | Year: 2014

The broader impacts/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project are to enable ultra-high capacity disk drives. The explosion of global digital data and the need to store it is continuing to drive demand for disk storage. Approximately 550 million drives are sold each year with a value of about $35B. The greater storage densities created by heat assisted magnetic recording will drive down the cost of storage per Terabyte and greatly reduce the physical and thermal footprints in data centers. A 10X greater drive capacity translates to an approximate 90% reduction in the number of drives required for any given storage requirement. This will greatly reduce facility utility costs and emissions associated with housing, powering and cooling data centers.

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project aims to solve critical issues in heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) technology for next-generation of ultra-high capacity disk drives. High data storage densities achievable with HAMR technology are expected to radically improve drive storage capacities through much greater densities. However, durable near field transducers (NFTs) are critical components that must be realized before commercialization of the devices is possible. Plasmonic materials with refractory properties are natural candidates for durable NFTs. In-depth comprehensive understanding of the connection between thermal cyclic load, oxidation, stoichiometry, crystalline structure and plasmonic properties for the plasmonic ceramics at nanoscale requires sufficient scientific and experimental support. Numerical simulations, optical characterization and advanced electron microscopy techniques will be employed to investigate the performance of plasmonic ceramics with refractory properties as reliable NFTs for HAMR technology.


Nano-Meta Technologies, Inc. | Entity website

News Archive November 24, 2014: NMTI has advanced the HAMR (Heat-Assisted Magnetic Recording) technology by overcoming material limitations. Current HAMR technology employs "soft" noble metals as construction materials for the nano-antenna ...

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