Nanjing Museum

Nanjing, China

Nanjing Museum

Nanjing, China
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Shen G.,Nanjing Normal University | Fang Y.,Nanjing Museum | Bischoff J.L.,U.S. Geological Survey | Feng Y.-x.,University of Queensland | Zhao J.-x.,University of Queensland
Quaternary International | Year: 2010

The fossils of Chaoxian hominin, widely accepted as representing archaic Homo sapiens in eastern China, were recovered from the middle or slightly higher levels of Layer 2 deposits of a collapsed cave at Yinshan, Anhui Province. Results of mass spectrometric U-series dating of intercalated speleothem calcites are presented. Based mainly on four broadly coeval calcite samples, the hominin fossils should be bracketed in the range of 310-360 ka or somewhat older. These ages are much older than the previous estimate at 160-200 ka based on the U-series dating of fossil teeth and bones, and may be cited as supporting evidence for an earlier H. erectus-archaic H. sapiens interface in China. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.


Yang J.,Engineering Research Center for Historical and Cultural Heritage Conservation | Yang J.,Shaanxi Normal University | Hu D.-D.,Engineering Research Center for Historical and Cultural Heritage Conservation | Hu D.-D.,Shaanxi Normal University | Zhang H.,Nanjing Museum
Reactive and Functional Polymers | Year: 2012

In the work described here, poly(vinyl alcohol)-g-N-isopropylacrylamide was prepared via graft polymerisation of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) onto poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). The structure and components of the polymer were characterised by differential thermogravimetry (DTG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1H NMR) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) testing, respectively. The T-type peel adhesion strengths and water contact angles of the prepared graft copolymer membranes were determined at different temperatures. The results indicated that the membrane has an obvious change in adhesion and water contact angle around the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the thermosensitive PNIPAM, regardless of the composition of the copolymers. Based on the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometric (EDS) analysis of freeze-dried graft copolymer membranes swollen in water at various temperatures, a mechanism for the thermally induced adhesion properties of the graft copolymer was proposed. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Chen X.-L.,Nanjing Museum | Zhang J.-P.,Nanjing Museum | Lu G.,Nanjing University of Technology | Sun D.-D.,Nanjing University of Technology
Chung-kuo Tsao Chih/China Pulp and Paper | Year: 2015

This article presents the cleaning effect of different cleaning agents on the stimulated dirt and oil stains by comparing the pH value, tensile strength, colour difference, whiteness, tearing resistance and folding strength. Results indicated that 1.2% sodium dodecyl sulfate performed the best: whiteness and pH value of the paper increased obviously; while the tensile strength, folding strength and tearing resistance decreased less. It concluded that sodium dodecyl sulfate demonstrated an acceptable cleaning effect on the oil stains. ©, 2015, China Technical Association of Paper Industry. All right reserved.


Fan T.-F.,Nanjing Museum | Wan L.,Nanjing Museum
Zhuzao/Foundry | Year: 2012

Chen Zhang Pot is identified as the first-class historical relic of the nation. The XRF, CT, X-ray photograph and microscopic observation have been adopted for the non-destructive examination on Chen Zhang pot, and the manufacturing technology has been discussed. The results show that all the components of Chen Zhang Pot were separately cast and then assembled, and a variety of decorative techniques were adopted in the manufacturing process. And so, it is a unique art treasure.


Zhang H.,Nanjing Museum | Chen B.-R.,Nanjing University of Technology | Zhu Q.-G.,Nanjing Museum
Chung-kuo Tsao Chih/China Pulp and Paper | Year: 2014

Average polymerization degree of cellulose reflects the average length of the cellulose chains, polymerization degree is higher, the cellulose molecule chain is longer, and the paper is more durable. In contrast, polymerization degree is lower, the cellulose molecule chain is shorter, and the paper is less durable. Therefore, the polymerization degree of paper can reflect the level of paper degradation. The papers were individually treated by four kinds of oxidation decontamination material, and were aged by dry heat means, then the papers were characterized by means of measuring the polymerization degree of the papers. The results showed that polymerization degrees of the papers was decreased, the paper treated by KMnO4-H2C2O4 in particular, its polymerization degree decreased the most, it indicated that oxidative decontaminations had the large destructive action on paper relics. Therefore, oxidative decontamination would be cautionly used in the cleaning the stains of paper relics.


Zhang H.,Nanjing Museum | Zhang J.-P.,Nanjing Museum | Zhu Q.-G.,Nanjing Museum
Chung-kuo Tsao Chih/China Pulp and Paper | Year: 2015

According to the mould diseases of paper relics, seven kinds of mold were reparated and respectively inoculated on Xuan Paper, then the papers were characterized by means of measuring cellulose content, lignin content, carboxyl content, polymerization degree of paper samples after the growth of the molds, and compared with the blank paper samples. The results suggested that the seven kinds of mold all decreased the polymerization degree and cellulose content, and increased the lignin and carboxyl contents of the paper. The impact of mold on chemical composition of the paper was quantitatively measured, the internal structure of the paper was decomposed, the life of the paper was reduced. Obviously mildewproof is very important in paper relics preservation process. ©, 2015, China Technical Association of Paper Industry. All right reserved.


Wang H.-Y.,Nanjing University of Technology | Lu G.,Nanjing University of Technology | Zhang J.-P.,Nanjing Museum | Zheng D.-Q.,Nanjing Museum
Chung-kuo Tsao Chih/China Pulp and Paper | Year: 2012

N, N, N-tris(triethoxysilylpropyl) melamine was prepared by using polychlorostyrene as a skeleton and grafting with aminosiloxane KH-550 was used to paper culture heritage treatment. The heat aging test was used to evaluate the changes of pH value, tensile strength, alkaline residue and the fiber breaking percentage of the paper before and after treatment. Results showed that the pH value increased from 3.2 to 7.7~7.8, the tensile strength also increased from 915 N/m to 1300 N/m. Furthermore, the colour change in appearance (ΔE*=1.72) was slight. The heat aging tests indicated that the pH value of treated paper can stabilize in neutral or slight alkaline and also the tensile strength is kept in ~1200 N/m. Compared with the untreated paper, the paper treated with N, N, N-tris(triethoxysilylpropyl) melamine can effectively decrease its aging rate.


Wang H.-Y.,Nanjing University of Technology | Lu G.,Nanjing University of Technology | Zhang J.-P.,Nanjing Museum | Zheng D.-Q.,Nanjing Museum
Chung-kuo Tsao Chih/China Pulp and Paper | Year: 2012

The preparation of nano-Mg(OH) 2 by different processes, and the effect of the process on particle size and its distribution of nano-Mg(OH) 2 were studied. The nano-Mg(OH) 2 was used in deacidification treatment of the paper based cultural relics. The results showed that with the aid of ultrasonic and high temperature (90°C), the particles of Mg(OH) 2 prepared had a narrow size distribution between 17.9 nm and 86.6 nm, the mean size was 44.2 nm. After deacidification treatment with the nano- Mg(OH) 2 the pH value of the papers increased from 4.5 to 8.5. The heat aging test indicated that the papers after deacidification showed a good stability of pH value (~7.5) and the tensile strength (~715 N/m) so that they could be conserved for long-time.


News Article | October 29, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

It’s the story you love to hear in the antiques world. Rare maps found in garage sell for $24,000. Two dark, ripped images in poor condition in the Kaminski Auctions October 1st auction turned out to be just that. Several astute collectors on the phones and Internet recognized the pair of panels for what they really were, two panels of a map produced for the Korean market of Matteo Ricci's derivative map. Through a series of unlikely events the pair have found a temporary home with Barry Lawrence Ruderman Antique Maps at RareMaps.com in La Jolla, California. The two panels were first described as “two 19th century hand colored prints of the world" on closer inspection an astute cataloger recognized they were in fact maps and changed the description on all of the Internet bidding platforms. The maps were purchased twenty years ago at the Brimfield Antiques Show and were found in the garage of a Palm Desert home. “We only spotted the map about 24 hours before the sale doing a routine search for maps in upcoming auctions. My gallery manager, Alex Clausen, brought it to my attention, and the two of us quickly worked out that it was a 'Matteo Ricci derivative map.' We researched the map for about an hour, before concluding it was the 1708 'Korean edition' of Ricci. Twenty five hand painted copies were reported to have been done between 1605 and 1608, one of which survives in the Nanjing Museum " stated Barry Ruderman. Matteo Ricci was an Italian Jesuit missionary and one of the founding figures of the Jesuit Missions in China. Arriving in Macau in 1582 he began his missionary work. He was the first European to enter the Forbidden City of Beijing in 1601. His skills in astronomy and calendrical science caught the attention of the Wanli Emperor who granted Ricci a stipend in 1601, which allowed him to begin creating maps for the Emperor. In 1602 Matteo Ricci's published a World Map (Kunyu wanguo quantu), or Map of the Ten Thousand Countries of the Earth. It is the oldest surviving map in Chinese to show the Americas. The last example of the Ricci map to come to market was sold by Bernard Shapero Rare Books to the James Ford Bell Library for $1,000,000 around 2008. There are approximately six known complete examples of the Ricci World Map. In 1708 the Ricci map was copied for the Korean market. The Gonyeomangukjeondo is a Korean hand-copied reproduction by painter Kim Jin-yeo. This map represents the world in an ellipse. A copy of the 1708 Korean Ricci map is owned and displayed at the Seoul National University Museum and was designated National Treasure No.849 on August 9, 1985. There are only a few known surviving examples of the Korean copies and it appears they are more rare than the 1602 Ricci. Two are located in Korea and one in Edinburgh, Scotland. “The map sheets we purchased at Kaminski are Sections 1 (far left side) and 6 (far right side) of a 6 sheet World Map. The 1708 Korean Ricci map is noteworthy for its addition of sea monsters, sailing ships and other decorative embellishments, which is how we were able to identify what we were looking at from the images provided on line by Kaminski. “Our intention is to restore the map clean, stabilize, de-acidify, etc. and offer it for sale by December 2016. We suspect there should be considerable institutional and private interest, given the rarity and importance of the Ricci map ” said Ruderman. The maps were shipped to the consignor immediately after the auction and in a subsequent phone call Mr. Ruderman stated that, “Now, on closer inspection, we are leaning toward original Ming Dynasty hand painted copies. If these do prove to be originals from 1605-1608, it would be an even more exciting find. We are not aware of any of these maps appearing at auction or otherwise. A printed Ricci is obviously an exciting thing, but one of the hand painted Ming Dynasty era copies, extra illustrated with sea monsters and sailing ships, would be an even more extraordinary find." After a call alerting the Boston Symphony Orchestra press office that a large collection of drawings and paintings with assorted correspondence, all relating to the BSO by the artist Donald Carlisle Greason were coming up for auction, the collection sold for $7,200 and found a permanent home in the BSO archives. A 19th century Italian classical marble sculpture marble unsigned of a male torso from a Rome estate was hotly contested on the phones and Internet and was finally hammered down at $14,400. A circa 1920 Art Deco ladies diamond, emerald and platinum Jabo pin, from a New York collection, sold for $10,200. Jewelry as a category did well in the sale with a ten carat ladies platinum and diamond bracelet selling for $5,700, and a fourteen carat yellow gold, diamond and ruby necklace, with forty-nine natural step cut oval and pavilion rubies selling for $4,800. Signed mid century modern furniture continues to bring in the buyer’s. A Frank Gehry for Knoll bentwood table with four chairs stamped 06/19/93/, had numerous Internet bids and was finally hammered down at $4,800. All prices include twenty per cent buyer’s premium. For more information and to view our upcoming schedule go to http://www.kaminskiauctions.com and sign up to bid with KaminskiLIVE.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

Asian Art Museum of San Francisco Unearths Stories of Life and the Afterlife in Early China SAN FRANCISCO, CA--(Marketwired - November 16, 2016) - Like the Roman Empire, China's Han dynasty (206 BCE-220 CE) forged one of the most powerful, advanced civilizations of the ancient world, and its elite had it all: unbridled luxury, technical innovations and courtly romance. On Feb. 17, 2017 the Asian Art Museum unveils Tomb Treasures: New Discoveries from China's Han Dynasty, an original exhibition of more than 100 dazzling works recently unearthed from the coastal heartland of classical Chinese culture. Never before seen in the United States, these outstandingly crafted royal burial goods survived over 2,000 years underground. Together, they reveal how the early Han courts sought to glorify their statures in this life and in the next one: by creating delicate jade body suits sewn with gold threads, exquisitely decorated coffins, ingenious "smokeless" lamps, silver and bronze banquet utensils and ritual bell sets that still ring. "In addition to luxuries, royals surrounded themselves with domestic wares that surprise us with their intimate portrait of private life during the Han dynasty," says the museum's newly appointed curator for Chinese art, Fan Zhang. "We have everything from a large silver basin for taking baths, to a working stone latrine with an armrest, to a boldly designed ceramic urinal -- we even have two hollow bronze phalluses that could be used." Tomb Treasures exposes the lifestyles and private pleasures of the Han nobility. Coming four years after the wildly popular Terracotta Warriors exhibition at the Asian Art Museum, Tomb Treasures features even newer finds from Jiangsu province, near present-day Shanghai, telling a rich story of early China through these rare artworks and artifacts. The exhibition will be organized into three thematic areas: "This exhibition underscores how connected we really are to the past, that we share the same passions across time and culture," says museum director and exhibition co-curator Jay Xu. "These tomb treasures show how the Han people's ambitions relate to our own pursuit of comfort and security today. The search for longevity, the craving for immortality, the yearning for a joyful life and a satisfying afterlife -- is it the sweetness of this world that inspires our hopes for the next?" A public Opening Party on February 16, themed "In the Afterlife" will kick off Tomb Treasures with music, live performances and dancing. This evening party will also inaugurate the museum's popular 2017 Thursday Night Programs season, which takes place from mid-February to late-September. Tomb Treasures: New Discoveries from China's Han Dynasty is organized by the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco and the Nanjing Museum. Presentation is made possible with the generous support of The Bernard Osher Foundation, The Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang Fund for Excellence in Exhibitions and Presentations, Warren Felson and Lucy Sun, Angela and Gwong-Yih Lee, Fred Levin and Nancy Livingston, The Shenson Foundation, in memory of Ben and A. Jess Shenson, Hok Pui Leung and Sally Yu Leung, and Sampson C. and Faye Shen Fund. The Asian Art Museum-Chong-Moon Lee Center for Asian Art and Culture is one of San Francisco's premier arts institutions and home to a world-renowned collection of more than 18,000 Asian art treasures from throughout Asia spanning 6,000 years of history. Through rich art experiences, centered on historic and contemporary artworks, the Asian Art Museum unlocks the past for visitors, bringing it to life while serving as a catalyst for new art, new creativity and new thinking.

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