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MARLBOROUGH, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. (Sunovion), five leading mental health advocacy organizations and multi-platinum, Grammy-nominated singer, songwriter and mental health advocate Demi Lovato today released Beyond Silence, a documentary film created by photographer and filmmaker Shaul Schwarz, who is represented by Getty Images and Verbatim. The documentary follows Jeff Fink, Lauren Burke and Lloyd Hale, three very different people who share one common experience—their lives have been transformed by speaking up for mental health. The film, which can be streamed on the Be Vocal website, chronicles their efforts to live well and break through the silence often associated with mental illness. The Be Vocal initiative encourages individuals living with mental health conditions to speak up for themselves and as a community to help advance mental health in America. “Over the years, I’ve had the opportunity to openly share my story with so many people, but it’s not just my story that deserves to be heard. I am so excited to help share the stories of Jeff, Lauren and Lloyd, and so grateful to them for letting us all into their lives,” said Demi Lovato, who served as executive producer of the documentary. “Beyond Silence, in both its darkest and most joyful moments, shines a light on the importance of hope in the face of adversity and how friends, coworkers and even pets can make a meaningful difference. I encourage everyone to watch, share and talk about this film. Only by speaking up together can we advance mental health in America.” Combining intimate day-in-the-life footage and interviews, Beyond Silence provides a glimpse into the lives of each individual and their diagnoses—which include bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, depression and anxiety. The film weaves these individual experiences into a cohesive narrative about how speaking up is key to living well with a mental health condition. “Stories have the power to change hearts and minds, shape perceptions and inspire action for the greater good,” said Shaul Schwarz, film director represented by Getty Images and Verbatim. “I am so grateful to Jeff, Lauren and Lloyd for their courage, their heart and their vulnerability. Through Beyond Silence, these individuals invite us into their most private lives to share their struggles, triumphs, setbacks and celebrations, teaching us the importance of being vocal.” Information about Beyond Silence and the Be Vocal initiative, including tips and tools for speaking up can be found at www.BeVocalSpeakUp.com. “For years I was surrounded by darkness, isolated from the world around me,” said Jeff Fink. “Life changed and a newfound sense of hope surfaced the day I got my dog, Earl. Earl became the missing link in my struggle for wellness. He helped me live more in the present and to trust in the future, take more responsibility for my own health, and find purpose in helping others with mental health challenges. I hope my participation in Beyond Silence will inspire others to search for whatever link may be missing for them so they too can find hope, stability, purpose and confidence in the future.” “Throughout my life I, like so many others, wasn’t comfortable showing my imperfections. I had a growing career and was respected in my field, but I stayed silent—no one knew I was suffering,” said Lauren Burke. “Once I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, I realized that I can help others simply by speaking up. Through Beyond Silence, I hope to show that it’s possible to live a thriving and successful life despite any challenges people may face, and that our individual imperfections are what make us unique and human.” “Too often people find themselves isolated by their mental health status—experiencing shame or guilt for something that is beyond their control,” said Lloyd Hale. “If we spoke more openly, I think we’d find that many more people experience mental health challenges than we ever realized. By sharing my story, I hope to show others that we aren’t that different, and that together we can build a more open, supportive and accepting society.” About Be Vocal: Speak Up for Mental Health Be Vocal: Speak Up for Mental Health is a national initiative in partnership with Demi Lovato, the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance, The Jed Foundation, Mental Health America, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, the National Council for Behavioral Health and Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. The initiative is designed to empower adults living with mental health conditions to speak up when talking with their support team and to encourage everyone to speak up as a community to advance mental health in America. The Be Vocal initiative evolved out of The Mental Health Listening & Engagement Tour supported by Sunovion in 2014. The Tour connected Demi with top mental health advocacy organizations and helped her become a stronger, more informed advocate. For more information, visit www.BeVocalSpeakUp.com. Demi Lovato is a platinum-selling recording artist, songwriter, New York Times best-selling author, and an inspiration to millions. Her passion for raising awareness of issues surrounding mental health and personal empowerment has touched thousands of lives. Getty Images is among the world's leading creators and distributors of award-winning still imagery, video, music and multimedia products, as well as other forms of premium digital content, available through its trusted brands, including iStockphoto® and Thinkstock®. With its advanced search and image recognition technology, Getty Images serves business customers in more than 100 countries and is the first place creative and media professionals turn to discover, purchase and manage images and other digital content. Its best-in-class photographers and imagery help customers produce inspiring work, which appears every day in the world's most influential newspapers, magazines, advertising campaigns, films, television programs, books and online media. Verbatim is a creative resource for Corporate Social Impact communications offering master visual storytelling through the world renowned, award-winning photojournalists we represent and a commercial assignments agency with a global network of photographers and filmmakers. Shaul Schwarz is an award-winning filmmaker and photojournalist. His work has been screened at festivals across the globe, including Sundance, and he is a regular contributor to TIME Magazine and National Geographic Magazine. His work has also appeared in other major international publications such as Newsweek, Life and The New York Times, among others. About the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA) DBSA is the leading peer-directed national organization focused on creating wellness for people with mood disorders. JED is a leading national non-profit organization that exists to promote emotional health and prevent suicide for our nation’s teens and young adults. MHA is the nation's leading community-based nonprofit committed to promoting mental health as a critical part of overall wellness, and is guided by the Before Stage 4 philosophy that mental health conditions should be treated long before they reach the most critical points in the disease process. About the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) NAMI is the nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to building better lives for the millions of Americans affected by mental illness. About the National Council for Behavioral Health (The National Council) The National Council is the unifying voice of America’s community mental health and addictions treatment organizations. Sunovion is a global biopharmaceutical company focused on the innovative application of science and medicine to help people with serious medical conditions. Sunovion’s vision is to lead the way to a healthier world. The company’s spirit of innovation is driven by the conviction that scientific excellence paired with meaningful advocacy and relevant education can improve lives. With patients at the center of everything it does, Sunovion has charted new paths to life-transforming treatments that reflect ongoing investments in research and development and an unwavering commitment to support people with psychiatric, neurological and respiratory conditions. Headquartered in Marlborough, Mass., Sunovion is an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma Co., Ltd. Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Europe Ltd., based in London, England, Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Canada Inc., based in Mississauga, Ontario, and Sunovion CNS Development Canada ULC, based in Toronto, Ontario, are wholly-owned direct subsidiaries of Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. Additional information can be found on the company’s web sites: www.sunovion.com, www.sunovion.eu and www.sunovion.ca. Connect with Sunovion on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook and YouTube. Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. is a U.S. subsidiary of Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma Co., Ltd. © 2017 Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. All rights reserved. For a copy of this release, visit Sunovion’s web site at www.sunovion.com


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: co.newswire.com

The Nassau Film Festival will be running this year on Saturday, May 20, and Sunday, May 21, at the Princeton Garden Theatre. The festival is expanding this year to two days given the requests from festival goers to be able to show more films. 42 films this year will be screened from the 336 submissions received from countries in each of the six continents. The highlights this year are: We will also screen animation movies, documentaries and films by local filmmakers including Syth DeVoe, Communiversity; Kirk Pointon, A Wonderfully Difficult Journey (about developmental disabilities, Mercer Arc) and Tom Pyle, Passage of Hope (about mental health and the work of NAMI). The festival will also include student short films, including the winners of the Walnut Lane Student Film Festival. Festival times are Saturday, May 20, from 9:00 to 3:30 and Sunday, May 21, from 9:00 to 12:30 at the Princeton Garden Theatre. Admission, popcorn and refreshments are all free. For further information, click here.


Families for Treatment of Serious Mental Illness (TreatSMI), a nonprofit organization focused on advocacy, support and education for the seriously mentally ill and their family members, announced that it will be coming together with friends and fellow advocates for the first annual march demanding the right to treatment before tragedy for the 10 million Americans who suffer from a serious mental illness.  The Shattering Silence March will take place simultaneously in Washington DC; Augusta, ME; Sacramento, CA: Springfield, IL; Palm Beach, FL and Sarasota, FL, on May 20th, with a goal to raise awareness of the plight of the seriously-mentally ill: a hospital bed instead of jail, housing instead of homelessness, and an end to the criminalization of people with serious mental illnesses. The March will take place from 12:00 PM until 5:00 PM, on May 20th, in each location, and is open to the public. Family members and advocates will be sharing their stories about the lack of access to proper treatment, loved ones revolving in and out of hospitals, jails, and the street, and how mental illness is criminalized instead of treated like the medical illness it is. Please see below for location details. “I don't know when this country lost its human decency towards its most vulnerable citizens, but it surely has and it's time to stop it,” said Jeanne Gore, President of Families for Treatment of Serious Mental Illness (TreatSMI). “We need a revolution and we need one now! If our children were afflicted with cancer or diabetes, we would not be waiting until they reached Stage 4 in the disease, or become a danger to themselves or others, before being able to access treatment. We owe it to our children—and their children—to provide a country where ALL of our most vulnerable are treated with love, care, respect and compassion. “Please join us in replacing stigma with honor, silence with voice, despair with hope, shame with respect, and ignorance with science so that in 2017, we finally get treatment before tragedy,” added Gore. “We hope to be adding more state capitals and cities to the list very soon.” “Our children are dying everyday,” said DJ Jaffe, author of “Insane Consequences: How the Mental Health Industry Fails the Mentally Ill” and Executive Director of Mental Illness Policy Org. “They are being abused, neglected, tortured, shackled, jailed, subjected to solitary confinement, naked in their cells, covered in feces, and left to die in our jails and homeless in our streets.” “Even the most tenacious mental health advocates in our Hope for Mentally Ill program hit insurmountable roadblocks, and struggle with endless red tape, to help family members get the desperately-needed treatment and social justice for their mentally ill loved ones,” states Kerry Martin, CEO and Founder of Hope Xchange. “This is truly a heartbreaking situation, given that most seriously mentally ill individuals suffer from schizophrenia and severe bipolar disorder. They obviously aren’t in a position to advocate for themselves, not to mention navigate a woefully inadequate and totally underfunded mental health care system.” Hope Xchange is a patient advocacy nonprofit focused on preventing suicide and improving mental health outcomes in the most vulnerable and high-risk populations—youth, LGBTQA+ and bipolar communities—and is actively supporting the Shattering Silence March. The National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) estimates there are 10 million Americans suffering from a serious mental illness. [1] The DMS categorizes serious mental illnesses as those that result in functional impairment which substantially interferes with, or limits, one or more major life activities. It’s estimated that 4% of all mental illnesses are serious mental illnesses.  These include “schizophrenia-spectrum disorders,” “severe bipolar disorder,” and “severe major depression,” as specifically and narrowly-defined in DSM.”[2] In addition to these disorders, people who suffer with severe forms of obsessive compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and borderline personality disorder, are also functionally impaired. As many as 40% (Torrey & Zdanowicz, 2001) and 90% (Wilson, Ban, & Guy 1986) of people with a serious mental illness also suffer from anosognosia, a neurological condition that robs them of the ability to know they are sick. This means they will never ask for help on their own. The Treatment Advocacy Center’s research paper, Serious Mental Illness and Treatment Prevalence, published in 2016 states, “For the past 20 years, studies have consistently estimated that 40% to 50% of all individuals with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder are receiving no treatment for their mental illness at any given time. According to disease prevalence estimates of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and US Census Bureau data, this suggests 3.85 million people with the most severe psychiatric diseases were untreated in 2015.”[3] About Families for Treatment of Serious Mental Illness (TreatSMI) Founded in 2015, Families for Treatment of Serious Mental Illness (TreatSMI) is a non-profit organization dedicated to advocating at the state and local levels for treatment, programs, services, housing and care for those diagnosed with serious mental illnesses, and to provide support and education programs to families and caregivers. TreatSMI goals are to provide a strong grassroots advocacy network and offer support groups and classes aimed at dealing with the complex issues confronting families of those suffering from a serious mental illness. We are the only U.S. based national organization that: [1] Schizophrenia-spectrum disorders include schizoaffective disorder, catatonic schizophrenia, paranoid schizophrenia, and disorganized schizophrenia. In DSM, “severe bipolar” requires more symptoms than bipolar disorder. As in DJ Jaffe’s book, Insane Consequences: How the Mental Health Industry Fails the Mentally Ill , we shorten both to bipolar because there are not enough statistics that separate out the two. In DSM, “severe major depression” requires more symptoms than either “depression” or “major depression.” American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5 (Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 2013). [2] Schizophrenia-spectrum disorders include schizoaffective disorder, catatonic schizophrenia, paranoid schizophrenia, and disorganized schizophrenia. In DSM, “severe bipolar” requires more symptoms than bipolar disorder. As in DJ Jaffe’s book, Insane Consequences: How the Mental Health Industry Fails the Mentally Ill , we shorten both to bipolar because there are not enough statistics that separate out the two. In DSM, “severe major depression” requires more symptoms than either “depression” or “major depression.” American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5 (Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 2013).


Families for Treatment of Serious Mental Illness (TreatSMI), a nonprofit organization focused on advocacy, support and education for the seriously mentally ill and their family members, announced that it will be coming together with friends and fellow advocates for the first annual march demanding the right to treatment before tragedy for the 10 million Americans who suffer from a serious mental illness.  The Shattering Silence March will take place simultaneously in Washington DC; Augusta, ME; Sacramento, CA: Springfield, IL; Palm Beach, FL and Sarasota, FL, on May 20th, with a goal to raise awareness of the plight of the seriously-mentally ill: a hospital bed instead of jail, housing instead of homelessness, and an end to the criminalization of people with serious mental illnesses. The March will take place from 12:00 PM until 5:00 PM, on May 20th, in each location, and is open to the public. Family members and advocates will be sharing their stories about the lack of access to proper treatment, loved ones revolving in and out of hospitals, jails, and the street, and how mental illness is criminalized instead of treated like the medical illness it is. Please see below for location details. “I don't know when this country lost its human decency towards its most vulnerable citizens, but it surely has and it's time to stop it,” said Jeanne Gore, President of Families for Treatment of Serious Mental Illness (TreatSMI). “We need a revolution and we need one now! If our children were afflicted with cancer or diabetes, we would not be waiting until they reached Stage 4 in the disease, or become a danger to themselves or others, before being able to access treatment. We owe it to our children—and their children—to provide a country where ALL of our most vulnerable are treated with love, care, respect and compassion. “Please join us in replacing stigma with honor, silence with voice, despair with hope, shame with respect, and ignorance with science so that in 2017, we finally get treatment before tragedy,” added Gore. “We hope to be adding more state capitals and cities to the list very soon.” “Our children are dying everyday,” said DJ Jaffe, author of “Insane Consequences: How the Mental Health Industry Fails the Mentally Ill” and Executive Director of Mental Illness Policy Org. “They are being abused, neglected, tortured, shackled, jailed, subjected to solitary confinement, naked in their cells, covered in feces, and left to die in our jails and homeless in our streets.” “Even the most tenacious mental health advocates in our Hope for Mentally Ill program hit insurmountable roadblocks, and struggle with endless red tape, to help family members get the desperately-needed treatment and social justice for their mentally ill loved ones,” states Kerry Martin, CEO and Founder of Hope Xchange. “This is truly a heartbreaking situation, given that most seriously mentally ill individuals suffer from schizophrenia and severe bipolar disorder. They obviously aren’t in a position to advocate for themselves, not to mention navigate a woefully inadequate and totally underfunded mental health care system.” Hope Xchange is a patient advocacy nonprofit focused on preventing suicide and improving mental health outcomes in the most vulnerable and high-risk populations—youth, LGBTQA+ and bipolar communities—and is actively supporting the Shattering Silence March. The National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) estimates there are 10 million Americans suffering from a serious mental illness. [1] The DMS categorizes serious mental illnesses as those that result in functional impairment which substantially interferes with, or limits, one or more major life activities. It’s estimated that 4% of all mental illnesses are serious mental illnesses.  These include “schizophrenia-spectrum disorders,” “severe bipolar disorder,” and “severe major depression,” as specifically and narrowly-defined in DSM.”[2] In addition to these disorders, people who suffer with severe forms of obsessive compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and borderline personality disorder, are also functionally impaired. As many as 40% (Torrey & Zdanowicz, 2001) and 90% (Wilson, Ban, & Guy 1986) of people with a serious mental illness also suffer from anosognosia, a neurological condition that robs them of the ability to know they are sick. This means they will never ask for help on their own. The Treatment Advocacy Center’s research paper, Serious Mental Illness and Treatment Prevalence, published in 2016 states, “For the past 20 years, studies have consistently estimated that 40% to 50% of all individuals with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder are receiving no treatment for their mental illness at any given time. According to disease prevalence estimates of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and US Census Bureau data, this suggests 3.85 million people with the most severe psychiatric diseases were untreated in 2015.”[3] About Families for Treatment of Serious Mental Illness (TreatSMI) Founded in 2015, Families for Treatment of Serious Mental Illness (TreatSMI) is a non-profit organization dedicated to advocating at the state and local levels for treatment, programs, services, housing and care for those diagnosed with serious mental illnesses, and to provide support and education programs to families and caregivers. TreatSMI goals are to provide a strong grassroots advocacy network and offer support groups and classes aimed at dealing with the complex issues confronting families of those suffering from a serious mental illness. We are the only U.S. based national organization that: [1] Schizophrenia-spectrum disorders include schizoaffective disorder, catatonic schizophrenia, paranoid schizophrenia, and disorganized schizophrenia. In DSM, “severe bipolar” requires more symptoms than bipolar disorder. As in DJ Jaffe’s book, Insane Consequences: How the Mental Health Industry Fails the Mentally Ill , we shorten both to bipolar because there are not enough statistics that separate out the two. In DSM, “severe major depression” requires more symptoms than either “depression” or “major depression.” American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5 (Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 2013). [2] Schizophrenia-spectrum disorders include schizoaffective disorder, catatonic schizophrenia, paranoid schizophrenia, and disorganized schizophrenia. In DSM, “severe bipolar” requires more symptoms than bipolar disorder. As in DJ Jaffe’s book, Insane Consequences: How the Mental Health Industry Fails the Mentally Ill , we shorten both to bipolar because there are not enough statistics that separate out the two. In DSM, “severe major depression” requires more symptoms than either “depression” or “major depression.” American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5 (Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 2013).


Families for Treatment of Serious Mental Illness (TreatSMI), a nonprofit organization focused on advocacy, support and education for the seriously mentally ill and their family members, announced that it will be coming together with friends and fellow advocates for the first annual march demanding the right to treatment before tragedy for the 10 million Americans who suffer from a serious mental illness.  The Shattering Silence March will take place simultaneously in Washington DC; Augusta, ME; Sacramento, CA: Springfield, IL; Palm Beach, FL and Sarasota, FL, on May 20th, with a goal to raise awareness of the plight of the seriously-mentally ill: a hospital bed instead of jail, housing instead of homelessness, and an end to the criminalization of people with serious mental illnesses. The March will take place from 12:00 PM until 5:00 PM, on May 20th, in each location, and is open to the public. Family members and advocates will be sharing their stories about the lack of access to proper treatment, loved ones revolving in and out of hospitals, jails, and the street, and how mental illness is criminalized instead of treated like the medical illness it is. Please see below for location details. “I don't know when this country lost its human decency towards its most vulnerable citizens, but it surely has and it's time to stop it,” said Jeanne Gore, President of Families for Treatment of Serious Mental Illness (TreatSMI). “We need a revolution and we need one now! If our children were afflicted with cancer or diabetes, we would not be waiting until they reached Stage 4 in the disease, or become a danger to themselves or others, before being able to access treatment. We owe it to our children—and their children—to provide a country where ALL of our most vulnerable are treated with love, care, respect and compassion. “Please join us in replacing stigma with honor, silence with voice, despair with hope, shame with respect, and ignorance with science so that in 2017, we finally get treatment before tragedy,” added Gore. “We hope to be adding more state capitals and cities to the list very soon.” “Our children are dying everyday,” said DJ Jaffe, author of “Insane Consequences: How the Mental Health Industry Fails the Mentally Ill” and Executive Director of Mental Illness Policy Org. “They are being abused, neglected, tortured, shackled, jailed, subjected to solitary confinement, naked in their cells, covered in feces, and left to die in our jails and homeless in our streets.” “Even the most tenacious mental health advocates in our Hope for Mentally Ill program hit insurmountable roadblocks, and struggle with endless red tape, to help family members get the desperately-needed treatment and social justice for their mentally ill loved ones,” states Kerry Martin, CEO and Founder of Hope Xchange. “This is truly a heartbreaking situation, given that most seriously mentally ill individuals suffer from schizophrenia and severe bipolar disorder. They obviously aren’t in a position to advocate for themselves, not to mention navigate a woefully inadequate and totally underfunded mental health care system.” Hope Xchange is a patient advocacy nonprofit focused on preventing suicide and improving mental health outcomes in the most vulnerable and high-risk populations—youth, LGBTQA+ and bipolar communities—and is actively supporting the Shattering Silence March. The National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) estimates there are 10 million Americans suffering from a serious mental illness. [1] The DMS categorizes serious mental illnesses as those that result in functional impairment which substantially interferes with, or limits, one or more major life activities. It’s estimated that 4% of all mental illnesses are serious mental illnesses.  These include “schizophrenia-spectrum disorders,” “severe bipolar disorder,” and “severe major depression,” as specifically and narrowly-defined in DSM.”[2] In addition to these disorders, people who suffer with severe forms of obsessive compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and borderline personality disorder, are also functionally impaired. As many as 40% (Torrey & Zdanowicz, 2001) and 90% (Wilson, Ban, & Guy 1986) of people with a serious mental illness also suffer from anosognosia, a neurological condition that robs them of the ability to know they are sick. This means they will never ask for help on their own. The Treatment Advocacy Center’s research paper, Serious Mental Illness and Treatment Prevalence, published in 2016 states, “For the past 20 years, studies have consistently estimated that 40% to 50% of all individuals with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder are receiving no treatment for their mental illness at any given time. According to disease prevalence estimates of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and US Census Bureau data, this suggests 3.85 million people with the most severe psychiatric diseases were untreated in 2015.”[3] About Families for Treatment of Serious Mental Illness (TreatSMI) Founded in 2015, Families for Treatment of Serious Mental Illness (TreatSMI) is a non-profit organization dedicated to advocating at the state and local levels for treatment, programs, services, housing and care for those diagnosed with serious mental illnesses, and to provide support and education programs to families and caregivers. TreatSMI goals are to provide a strong grassroots advocacy network and offer support groups and classes aimed at dealing with the complex issues confronting families of those suffering from a serious mental illness. We are the only U.S. based national organization that: [1] Schizophrenia-spectrum disorders include schizoaffective disorder, catatonic schizophrenia, paranoid schizophrenia, and disorganized schizophrenia. In DSM, “severe bipolar” requires more symptoms than bipolar disorder. As in DJ Jaffe’s book, Insane Consequences: How the Mental Health Industry Fails the Mentally Ill , we shorten both to bipolar because there are not enough statistics that separate out the two. In DSM, “severe major depression” requires more symptoms than either “depression” or “major depression.” American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5 (Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 2013). [2] Schizophrenia-spectrum disorders include schizoaffective disorder, catatonic schizophrenia, paranoid schizophrenia, and disorganized schizophrenia. In DSM, “severe bipolar” requires more symptoms than bipolar disorder. As in DJ Jaffe’s book, Insane Consequences: How the Mental Health Industry Fails the Mentally Ill , we shorten both to bipolar because there are not enough statistics that separate out the two. In DSM, “severe major depression” requires more symptoms than either “depression” or “major depression.” American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5 (Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 2013).


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Depression is classified as a mood disorder, but which came first: the disorder or the distressed mood? Conversely, if depression results in negative thoughts and emotions, can changing those thoughts and emotions alleviate depression? "To some extent, the answer is yes," says Dr. Ken Duckworth, assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard University Medical School and medical director for the National Alliance on Mental Illness, or NAMI. Changing thought patterns is a primary goal of psychotherapy. One theory of depression known as the cognitive triad hypothesizes that negative views of oneself, the world at large and the future can be linked in a self-perpetuating cycle. Depressed individuals see themselves as helpless and worthless, and they also see the world as an especially negative and hopeless place. Therefore, they view their future as equally hopeless and impossible to improve. [See: Am I Just Sad -- or Actually Depressed?] "If someone has a lot of negative expectations, there is a belief that things can't work," says Arthur Nezu, professor of psychology at Drexel University. On the other hand, someone who believes that problems are a normal part of life is better able deal with them. "How we view ourselves affects our ability to have an impact on world," Nezu says. Changing that view is the goal of a treatment called cognitive behavioral therapy, or CBT. According to NAMI, CBT "focuses on exploring relationships among a person's thoughts, feelings and behaviors." A licensed therapist works with the patient "to uncover unhealthy patterns of thought and how they may be causing self-destructive behaviors and beliefs," NAMI explains. "The whole principle behind CBT is that your feelings follow your thoughts. If you have recurrent negative thoughts, that can make depression worse," Duckworth says. Of all the psychotherapies, CBT has been the best studied and validated, he says, though there are many other methods that are also proven to help patients make productive changes in thinking, such as interpersonal psychotherapy. However, changing thought patterns doesn't always lift depression. "For some people, changing thinking alone can help, but many more need medications or other interventions plus CBT," he says. It's possible for people to change their patterns of thinking on their own, at least in the earliest stages of the disease. "There is some research that shows that self-help books based on evidence-based therapies can work," Nezu says, "but it depends on how severe and how long the depression has been. For someone mildly depressed and motivated, they probably can do it on their own." Duckworth recommends the book "Feeling Good" by Dr. David Burns, as does Carol Landau, a clinical professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown University's Alpert Medical School. "I believe in books, and this is an excellent book about CBT, with lots of worksheets and checklists," she says. However, she also warns that there are limits to how much anyone can self-treat. "When you get to the sobbing part, you should probably talk to someone," she says. [See: 11 Simple, Proven Ways to Optimize Your Mental Health.] Therapists work with patients to help them recognize their negative, self-destructive thought patterns and change them. "I would emphasize that it is not that easy to do CBT without hiring a helper," Duckworth says. "You need a therapist to help you break it down." And there is more to it than "positive thinking," Landau says. "I hate that term. If you have depression -- or cancer or heart disease, for that matter -- and someone says 'think positively,' you are blaming the victim." Cognitive therapies are more sophisticated and complicated than that, she says. Adds Nezu: "It's like trying to learn how to play tennis or drive a boat. You can learn on your own but it can be very helpful to take a course. A lot of therapies are very skills-based; they provide tools or skills to use. A coach can teach tennis skills, and I would teach other skills so that when you are under stress you can try to do something different." One such skill, Landau says, is prompting patients to put negative thoughts into context. "You go from global to individual, so instead of saying 'my job sucks,' you look at what happened today and how you might make it better. You scan the day and focus on one thing that was good and meaningful. You take a more realistic view of things, not just with positive thinking but with what you can control. You can't change a pessimist to an optimist, but you can move them along the continuum." [See: How to Find the Best Mental Health Professional for You.] The best therapist is one that you feel connected to, Duckworth says. "The evidence for CBT is better, but there is also some evidence that any therapist who listens to you, as long as you feel connected to them, is better than no treatment at all." Therapists trained in CBT can be hard to find, he says, so he advises asking your clinician what type of therapy she does and, specifically, how she approaches depression. No matter what path you take, he says, "Psychotherapy is usually helpful." David Levine is a freelance health reporter at U.S. News. He is a contributing writer for athenaInsight.com and Wainscot Health Media, a former health care columnist for Governing magazine and a regular contributor to many other health and wellness publications. He also writes about lifestyle and general interest topics, from history and business to beer and baseball, as a contributing writer for Westchester, Hudson Valley and 914INC magazines. His work has appeared in The New York Times, Sports Illustrated, American Heritage and dozens of other national publications, and he is the author or co-author of six books on sports. You can connect him on LinkedIn.


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Mediaplanet announces distribution of the latest edition of “Mental Health,” a cross-platform campaign that highlights prevention/intervention services, treatment advancements, and support programs for the mental health community. 1 in 5 adults in the US have a mental health condition that is 43.8 million experience a mental illness in a given year. Furthermore, 9.8 million adults experience a serious mental illness in a given year such as schizophrenia, bio-polar disorder, and major depression. Unfortunately, the negative stigma surrounding mental health only intensifies the situation, preventing people from seeking help due to feelings of shame and can even lead to suicide in some cases. Mental Health is a critical part of overall wellness and it’s imperative we treat it as is. This Mental Health Awareness Month we are making mental health a priority and putting advocacy at the forefront. Actress & Mental Health Advocate, Mayim Bialik, speaks out about her family’s personal mental health struggles and how resources like NAMI and her own educational background helped her understand these illnesses more. In an exclusive interview with Mediaplanet, Mayim share what being stigma-free means to her as it is so important that we, as a society overcome the negative sigma commonly associate with mental health issues. “Being stigma-free means bringing to light things we have kept dark for so long,” she explains. “Stigma-free means acknowledging we struggle and showing the ways we cope so that we can still be present, functional and production in our work, home and love lives,” Mayim concludes. The print component of “Mental Health” is distributed within the May 18th issue of USA Today in New York, LA, Chicago, Washington D.C./Baltimore, and Philadelphia with a circulation of approximately 250,000 copies and an estimated readership of 750,000 readers. The digital component is distributed nationally, through a vast social media strategy, and across a network of top news sites and partner outlets. To explore the digital version of the campaign, click here. This edition of “Mental Health” was made possible with the support of NAMI, Mental Health America, Depression & Bipolar Support Alliance, Scizophrenia & Related Disorers Alliance of America, Anxiety & Depression Association of America, Mayim Bialik, Torrey DeVitto, Alkermes, Scattergood Foundation, Margaret Clark Morgan Foundation, Sunovion, Neurocrine Biosciences, Center for Cognition & Recovery, Screening For Mental Health, Admera Health, National Center for PTSD, Mental Health Channel, Entertainment Industries Council, The Carter Center, Art With Impact, Clubhouse International, Molloy College and many more. About Mediaplanet Mediaplanet specializes in the creation of content marketing campaigns covering a variety of industries. We tell meaningful stories that educate our audience and position our clients as solution providers. Our unique ability to pair the right leaders with the right readers, through the right platforms, has made Mediaplanet a global content marketing powerhouse. Our award-winning stories have won the hearts of countless readers while serving as a valuable platform for brands and their missions. Just call us storytellers with a purpose. Please visit http://www.mediaplanet.com for more on who we are and what we do.


Dr. Tonmoy Sharma has been recognized with numerous awards, honors and grants for his work in advancing mental health and its treatment in the United States, Europe and Southeast Asia. He is a prolific researcher and scientist as well as the author or co-author of more than 200 peer-reviewed articles and five books on schizophrenia and mental illness. Dr. Sharma, recently selected by the Orange County Business Journal (OCBJ) is listed in the OC500 as one of the most influential people in the Orange County business community, has served on numerous editorial boards, acted as peer reviewer for 14 international medical journals, and has been on various advisory boards governing the development of antipsychotics, and is on the board of directors to the National Alliance on Mental Illness Orange County (NAMI OC). This course meets the qualifications for three (3) hours of continuing education credit for LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs, and/or LEPs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences. Completion certificates will be awarded for full attendance of the event. Sovereign Health's mission is to provide a broad spectrum of high-quality behavioral health treatment services for adults and adolescents, including support services for family members. One factor that differentiates Sovereign from other treatment providers has been the company's ability to offer separate mental health and addiction or dual diagnosis treatment programs at its facilities. For more information, visit www.sovhealth.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/dr-tonmoy-sharma-ceo-for-sovereign-health-to-present-on-measurement-based-care-at-the-state-of-recovery-workshop-300460444.html


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

According to Molly Moilanen, co-chair of Minnesotans for a Smoke-Free Generation, a coalition of more than 50 health organizations, "Almost 95 percent of adult smokers started by 21. That means to prevent addiction, we must keep people from starting before then. Raising the tobacco age will help do that." A national consensus is growing to prevent addictions and future health problems by raising the sales age for tobacco products to 21. Two states and more than 220 cities and counties throughout the United States have raised the tobacco age. Edina was the first city in Minnesota to raise the smoking age earlier this week. Minnesotans for a Smoke-Free Generation is a coalition of Minnesota organizations that share a common goal of saving Minnesota youth from a lifetime of addiction to tobacco. Each year in Minnesota tobacco use is responsible for more than 6,300 deaths and more than $3 billion in preventable health care costs. 95 percent of adult smokers started before the age of 21. The coalition supports policies that prevent initiation and reduce youth smoking, including keeping tobacco prices high, raising the tobacco sale age to 21, limiting access to candy-, fruit- and menthol-flavored tobacco and funding future tobacco prevention programs. Partners include: A Healthier Southwest, African American Leadership Forum, Allina Health, American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, American Heart Association, American Lung Association in Minnesota, Apple Tree Dental, Association for Nonsmokers – Minnesota, Becker County Energize, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota, CentraCare Health, Children's Defense Fund – Minnesota, Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, ClearWay MinnesotaSM, Comunidades Latinos Unidas En Servicio – CLUES, Essentia Health, Four Corners Partnership, Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare, HealthEast, HealthPartners, Hennepin County Medical Center, Hope Dental Clinic, Indigenous Peoples Task Force, ISAIAH, LAAMPP Institute, Lake Region Healthcare, Lincoln Park Children and Families Collaborative, Local Public Health Association of Minnesota, March of Dimes, Mayo Clinic, Medica, Minnesota Academy of Family Physicians, Minnesota Association of Community Health Centers, Minnesota Cancer Alliance, Minnesota Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Minnesota Council of Health Plans, Minnesota Hospital Association, Minnesota Medical Association, Minnesota Oral Health Coalition, Minnesota Public Health Association, Model Cities of St. Paul, Inc., NAMI Minnesota, North Memorial Health Care, NorthPoint Health and Wellness Center, PartnerSHIP 4 Health, Perham Health, Rainbow Health Initiative, SEIU Healthcare Minnesota, St. Paul Chamber of Commerce, Tobacco Free Alliance, Twin Cities Medical Society, UCare and WellShare International. Find out more at: smokefreegenmn.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/legislation-would-raise-minnesotas-smoking-age-to-21-300451619.html


News Article | June 20, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Chirlane I. McCray, First Lady of New York City NAMI Distinguished Service Award Honoree Award-winning film about love and living with schizophrenia drawn from the writer's (Vincent Sabella) life. Followed by a discussion with Sabella (writer and director) and Joe Dain (producer). God Knows Where I Am (Clips) A homeless woman is found dead in an abandoned New Hampshire farmhouse. Based on her diary. Discussion to follow with Todd Wider, M.D. and Jedd Wider, Esq., producers and directors of acclaimed social justice documentaries. Please see the full convention program for detailed information about major sessions and workshops that will present the latest scientific research, treatment innovations, education programs, public policy issues and many other topics. NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, is the nation's largest grassroots organization dedicated to building better lives for the millions of Americans affected by mental illness. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/national-alliance-on-mental-illness-nami-announces-annual-convention-highlights-300476928.html

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