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MARLBOROUGH, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. (Sunovion), five leading mental health advocacy organizations and multi-platinum, Grammy-nominated singer, songwriter and mental health advocate Demi Lovato today released Beyond Silence, a documentary film created by photographer and filmmaker Shaul Schwarz, who is represented by Getty Images and Verbatim. The documentary follows Jeff Fink, Lauren Burke and Lloyd Hale, three very different people who share one common experience—their lives have been transformed by speaking up for mental health. The film, which can be streamed on the Be Vocal website, chronicles their efforts to live well and break through the silence often associated with mental illness. The Be Vocal initiative encourages individuals living with mental health conditions to speak up for themselves and as a community to help advance mental health in America. “Over the years, I’ve had the opportunity to openly share my story with so many people, but it’s not just my story that deserves to be heard. I am so excited to help share the stories of Jeff, Lauren and Lloyd, and so grateful to them for letting us all into their lives,” said Demi Lovato, who served as executive producer of the documentary. “Beyond Silence, in both its darkest and most joyful moments, shines a light on the importance of hope in the face of adversity and how friends, coworkers and even pets can make a meaningful difference. I encourage everyone to watch, share and talk about this film. Only by speaking up together can we advance mental health in America.” Combining intimate day-in-the-life footage and interviews, Beyond Silence provides a glimpse into the lives of each individual and their diagnoses—which include bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, depression and anxiety. The film weaves these individual experiences into a cohesive narrative about how speaking up is key to living well with a mental health condition. “Stories have the power to change hearts and minds, shape perceptions and inspire action for the greater good,” said Shaul Schwarz, film director represented by Getty Images and Verbatim. “I am so grateful to Jeff, Lauren and Lloyd for their courage, their heart and their vulnerability. Through Beyond Silence, these individuals invite us into their most private lives to share their struggles, triumphs, setbacks and celebrations, teaching us the importance of being vocal.” Information about Beyond Silence and the Be Vocal initiative, including tips and tools for speaking up can be found at www.BeVocalSpeakUp.com. “For years I was surrounded by darkness, isolated from the world around me,” said Jeff Fink. “Life changed and a newfound sense of hope surfaced the day I got my dog, Earl. Earl became the missing link in my struggle for wellness. He helped me live more in the present and to trust in the future, take more responsibility for my own health, and find purpose in helping others with mental health challenges. I hope my participation in Beyond Silence will inspire others to search for whatever link may be missing for them so they too can find hope, stability, purpose and confidence in the future.” “Throughout my life I, like so many others, wasn’t comfortable showing my imperfections. I had a growing career and was respected in my field, but I stayed silent—no one knew I was suffering,” said Lauren Burke. “Once I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, I realized that I can help others simply by speaking up. Through Beyond Silence, I hope to show that it’s possible to live a thriving and successful life despite any challenges people may face, and that our individual imperfections are what make us unique and human.” “Too often people find themselves isolated by their mental health status—experiencing shame or guilt for something that is beyond their control,” said Lloyd Hale. “If we spoke more openly, I think we’d find that many more people experience mental health challenges than we ever realized. By sharing my story, I hope to show others that we aren’t that different, and that together we can build a more open, supportive and accepting society.” About Be Vocal: Speak Up for Mental Health Be Vocal: Speak Up for Mental Health is a national initiative in partnership with Demi Lovato, the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance, The Jed Foundation, Mental Health America, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, the National Council for Behavioral Health and Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. The initiative is designed to empower adults living with mental health conditions to speak up when talking with their support team and to encourage everyone to speak up as a community to advance mental health in America. The Be Vocal initiative evolved out of The Mental Health Listening & Engagement Tour supported by Sunovion in 2014. The Tour connected Demi with top mental health advocacy organizations and helped her become a stronger, more informed advocate. For more information, visit www.BeVocalSpeakUp.com. Demi Lovato is a platinum-selling recording artist, songwriter, New York Times best-selling author, and an inspiration to millions. Her passion for raising awareness of issues surrounding mental health and personal empowerment has touched thousands of lives. Getty Images is among the world's leading creators and distributors of award-winning still imagery, video, music and multimedia products, as well as other forms of premium digital content, available through its trusted brands, including iStockphoto® and Thinkstock®. With its advanced search and image recognition technology, Getty Images serves business customers in more than 100 countries and is the first place creative and media professionals turn to discover, purchase and manage images and other digital content. Its best-in-class photographers and imagery help customers produce inspiring work, which appears every day in the world's most influential newspapers, magazines, advertising campaigns, films, television programs, books and online media. Verbatim is a creative resource for Corporate Social Impact communications offering master visual storytelling through the world renowned, award-winning photojournalists we represent and a commercial assignments agency with a global network of photographers and filmmakers. Shaul Schwarz is an award-winning filmmaker and photojournalist. His work has been screened at festivals across the globe, including Sundance, and he is a regular contributor to TIME Magazine and National Geographic Magazine. His work has also appeared in other major international publications such as Newsweek, Life and The New York Times, among others. About the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA) DBSA is the leading peer-directed national organization focused on creating wellness for people with mood disorders. JED is a leading national non-profit organization that exists to promote emotional health and prevent suicide for our nation’s teens and young adults. MHA is the nation's leading community-based nonprofit committed to promoting mental health as a critical part of overall wellness, and is guided by the Before Stage 4 philosophy that mental health conditions should be treated long before they reach the most critical points in the disease process. About the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) NAMI is the nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to building better lives for the millions of Americans affected by mental illness. About the National Council for Behavioral Health (The National Council) The National Council is the unifying voice of America’s community mental health and addictions treatment organizations. Sunovion is a global biopharmaceutical company focused on the innovative application of science and medicine to help people with serious medical conditions. Sunovion’s vision is to lead the way to a healthier world. The company’s spirit of innovation is driven by the conviction that scientific excellence paired with meaningful advocacy and relevant education can improve lives. With patients at the center of everything it does, Sunovion has charted new paths to life-transforming treatments that reflect ongoing investments in research and development and an unwavering commitment to support people with psychiatric, neurological and respiratory conditions. Headquartered in Marlborough, Mass., Sunovion is an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma Co., Ltd. Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Europe Ltd., based in London, England, Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Canada Inc., based in Mississauga, Ontario, and Sunovion CNS Development Canada ULC, based in Toronto, Ontario, are wholly-owned direct subsidiaries of Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. Additional information can be found on the company’s web sites: www.sunovion.com, www.sunovion.eu and www.sunovion.ca. Connect with Sunovion on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook and YouTube. Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. is a U.S. subsidiary of Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma Co., Ltd. © 2017 Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc. All rights reserved. For a copy of this release, visit Sunovion’s web site at www.sunovion.com


News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: www.npr.org

Should I Trust Wikipedia With My Health? Dr. James Heilman isn't an easy man to get hold of — he kept offering us odd, off-hour windows of availability to do a phone interview. When we finally connected, he explained: He works the night shift as an emergency room physician in British Columbia. He also puts in time as a clinical assistant professor in emergency medicine. And then there's the 60 — count 'em, 60! — hours a week he toils away editing Wikipedia, the massive online encyclopedia written and edited by, well, anyone who wants to give it a whirl. "My wife likes to joke that Wikipedia's my mistress," Heilman says. "I prefer to call it our first child." He chuckles with a tinge of recognition that he may have gone off the rails a bit, in his zeal to make the profuse number of health-related pages on the site more accurate. So how does an emergency doc become an obsessive Wikipedian? About 10 years ago, he says, during a quiet night shift, he got to browsing one of the medical articles. "I thought, 'Oh, my God this is really bad,' " he says. "And then I saw the edit button, and I realized, 'Oh, my God, I could fix the internet!' I sort of got madly hooked. I've been trying to fix the Internet ever since." Part of that quest was creating the WikiProject Medicine group, where 320 like-minded editors work on the site's health content. Heilman estimates about half are medical professionals. Reworking Wikipedia health entries is not a trivial task. A 2014 study found about 25,000 pages of health-related articles in the English language. That number is now up to 32,000, Heilman says. The health pages worldwide attracted almost 4.9 billion page views in 2013. A 2012 survey of several hundred medical students found 94 percent use the site for health information. But, despite its popularity, the reliability of Wikipedia's medical content has often been questioned. A 2011 review on the accuracy and thoroughness of the site's medical entries found mixed results. Other studies show that the site fell short in gastroenterology and hepatology, as well as in general drug information, and in information on the cholesterol-lowering drugs statins (which was later improved). Pages having to do with ear, nose and throat problems were also found wanting. Other studies found the website provided better information on conditions related to nephrology and on the pages having to do with depression and schizophrenia. But just recently, in the journal The Lancet Global Health, researchers complained that Wikipedia entries on stillbirths were missing critical information. And in a 2014 study that compared published, peer-reviewed research from scientific journals to Wikipedia articles on the same 10 diseases and conditions, the authors found a significant number of assertions in the Wikipedia material that were unsupported by the evidence. Heilman doesn't think much of that particular review; he and several other medical specialists who contribute to Wikipedia co-wrote a rebuttal that questioned the study's rigor. Still, he acknowledges "there's a lot of work to do" to bring health entries on Wikipedia up to snuff. An editorial last month in the online media outlet The Conversation, Thomas Shafee, a biochemist at La Trobe University, in Melbourne, Australia, (and frequent contribute to Wikipedia) called on other researchers and doctors to make Wikipedia better. "Health professionals have a duty to improve the accuracy of medical entries in Wikipedia, because it's the first port of call for people all over the world seeking medical information," Shafee wrote. "The accuracy of the site is vital, because every medical entry... has the potential for immediate real-world health consequences." Some other academics agree. Dr. Amin Azzam, a research psychiatrist at the University of California, San Francisco, recently co-authored a report published in the journal Academic Medicine titled "Why Medical Schools Should Embrace Wikipedia." Efforts to improve the entire site, including the health section, are already underway. Hundreds of students in both the U.S. and Canada, for example, are working as editors through the Wiki Education Foundation, a nonprofit organization based in San Francisco that acts as a bridge between Wikipedia and academia. The organization encourages university faculty to assign students Wikipedia entries as a part of coursework. "Rather than write a biography of a woman scientist for their class that their instructor would read and throw away and never engage in again, these students instead have the opportunity to create content for Wikipedia where thousands of people can gain from their work," says the foundation's director of programs, LiAnna Davis. Pharmacology students at the University of California, San Francisco, for example, are working to improve entries on popular drugs like the HIV antiviral drug Abacavir. Students in a voice disorders class at McGill University in Montreal are adding information about laryngitis. As students fill in missing information, they improve gross inadequacies, Davis explains, and rewrite articles in a way that uses fewer technical terms, so they can be better understood by the general public. Since the start of 2016, about 280 science classes at universities in the U.S. and Canada have added content to 3,650 articles and generated 300 new entries receiving more than 102 million views, Davis says. Heilman cites other improvements to the crowd-sourced compendium, including a collaboration with the group Translators Without Borders to rewrite Wikipedia medical content in as many languages as possible — including Odia, a language spoken by tens of millions of people in India that is not included in Google Translate. Heilman is also proud of the Wikipedia entry for dengue fever, which was published in the peer-reviewed, open-access journal Open Medicine. Some federal agencies are also partnering with Wikipedia. The National Institutes of Health is creating an online biomedical dictionary for PubMed Health, which provides consumer-friendly summaries of research information. Usually, the NIH creates the definitions by drawing on material in its own collection, but sometimes uses Wikipedia as a source, according to NIH staff. Both organizations benefit, as the NIH will flag Heilman if it comes across something inaccurate in the Wikipedia material. "I spend a fair amount of time trying to convince my colleagues to come work on Wikipedia," Heilman says. "As a physician I believe all people deserve access to quality health care information." So, after all is said and done, how should the average person approach a web search for good consumer health information? Azzam, the UCSF psychiatrist who called for medical schools to embrace Wikipedia, says he would, nonetheless, send his patients first to government sites — like the National Institutes of Health, or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the National Library of Medicine for reliable health information. "Many of those sites have information targeting 'lay' people," he says. "Additionally there are national advocacy organizations for specific disease and/or health conditions. For example, as a psychiatrist I will refer my patients and their families to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)." And for anyone turning to Wikipedia as a health resource, Azzam advises going one more step, and clicking the "Talk" tab near the top left of every page. That will take you to a rating of how thorough and accurate Wikipedia editors think that particular page is. He also says it's a good idea to check the references that each assertion of fact in Wikipedia entries is required to link to. (You can do this by clicking on the superscript numbers at the end of a sentence.) "That gives me some idea of how much to trust the content," Azzam says. And get information from multiple sources, he recommends, to ferret out any outliers. That's "effectively a proxy measure for validity," he says. Finally, if you want to consult material that health professionals use themselves, says Azzam, try UpToDate, or PubMed, or studies in peer-reviewed journals. Health information is on a "continuum," he believes, with subscription-only, top tier scholarly journals on one end and the free, user-created Wikipedia on the other. "We believe [journal] content to be the scientific truth as we know it because content experts have peer-reviewed the manuscripts," Azzam says. "But the challenge at that extreme is gaining access to that knowledge — especially with high-cost subscription charges." That is why he's working with students to improve Wikipedia, "pulling that pole toward the other end of the spectrum." "Since so many consumers of health information online are reading that content, I want to be a part of a movement to make it as high quality as possible!" Heilman, the avid health editor, also recommends checking multiple, high-quality sources when looking for health information, paying closest attention to areas where the sources agree. Meanwhile, he'll keep carving out hours to improve Wikipedia. "As a physician, I can help one person at a time," he says. "But as a Wikipedian, I can make a difference in millions and millions of people's lives." This story was produced by KQED's health and technology blog, Future of You.


News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: www.npr.org

Should I Trust Wikipedia With My Health? Dr. James Heilman isn't an easy man to get hold of — he kept offering us odd, off-hour windows of availability to do a phone interview. When we finally connected, he explained: He works the night shift as an emergency room physician in British Columbia. He also puts in time as a clinical assistant professor in emergency medicine. And then there's the 60 — count 'em, 60! — hours a week he toils away editing Wikipedia, the massive online encyclopedia written and edited by, well, anyone who wants to give it a whirl. "My wife likes to joke that Wikipedia's my mistress," Heilman says. "I prefer to call it our first child." He chuckles with a tinge of recognition that he may have gone off the rails a bit, in his zeal to make the profuse number of health-related pages on the site more accurate. So how does an emergency doc become an obsessive Wikipedian? About 10 years ago, he says, during a quiet night shift, he got to browsing one of the medical articles. "I thought, 'Oh, my God this is really bad,' " he says. "And then I saw the edit button, and I realized, 'Oh, my God, I could fix the internet!' I sort of got madly hooked. I've been trying to fix the Internet ever since." Part of that quest was creating the WikiProject Medicine group, where 320 like-minded editors work on the site's health content. Heilman estimates about half are medical professionals. Reworking Wikipedia health entries is not a trivial task. A 2014 study found about 25,000 pages of health-related articles in the English language. That number is now up to 32,000, Heilman says. The health pages worldwide attracted almost 4.9 billion page views in 2013. A 2012 survey of several hundred medical students found 94 percent use the site for health information. But, despite its popularity, the reliability of Wikipedia's medical content has often been questioned. A 2011 review on the accuracy and thoroughness of the site's medical entries found mixed results. Other studies show that the site fell short in gastroenterology and hepatology, as well as in general drug information, and in information on the cholesterol-lowering drugs statins (which was later improved). Pages having to do with ear, nose and throat problems were also found wanting. Other studies found the website provided better information on conditions related to nephrology and on the pages having to do with depression and schizophrenia. But just recently, in the journal The Lancet Global Health, researchers complained that Wikipedia entries on stillbirths were missing critical information. And in a 2014 study that compared published, peer-reviewed research from scientific journals to Wikipedia articles on the same 10 diseases and conditions, the authors found a significant number of assertions in the Wikipedia material that were unsupported by the evidence. Heilman doesn't think much of that particular review; he and several other medical specialists who contribute to Wikipedia co-wrote a rebuttal that questioned the study's rigor. Still, he acknowledges "there's a lot of work to do" to bring health entries on Wikipedia up to snuff. An editorial last month in the online media outlet The Conversation, Thomas Shafee, a biochemist at La Trobe University, in Melbourne, Australia, (and frequent contribute to Wikipedia) called on other researchers and doctors to make Wikipedia better. "Health professionals have a duty to improve the accuracy of medical entries in Wikipedia, because it's the first port of call for people all over the world seeking medical information," Shafee wrote. "The accuracy of the site is vital, because every medical entry... has the potential for immediate real-world health consequences." Some other academics agree. Dr. Amin Azzam, a research psychiatrist at the University of California, San Francisco, recently co-authored a report published in the journal Academic Medicine titled "Why Medical Schools Should Embrace Wikipedia." Efforts to improve the entire site, including the health section, are already underway. Hundreds of students in both the U.S. and Canada, for example, are working as editors through the Wiki Education Foundation, a nonprofit organization based in San Francisco that acts as a bridge between Wikipedia and academia. The organization encourages university faculty to assign students Wikipedia entries as a part of coursework. "Rather than write a biography of a woman scientist for their class that their instructor would read and throw away and never engage in again, these students instead have the opportunity to create content for Wikipedia where thousands of people can gain from their work," says the foundation's director of programs, LiAnna Davis. Pharmacology students at the University of California, San Francisco, for example, are working to improve entries on popular drugs like the HIV antiviral drug Abacavir. Students in a voice disorders class at McGill University in Montreal are adding information about laryngitis. As students fill in missing information, they improve gross inadequacies, Davis explains, and rewrite articles in a way that uses fewer technical terms, so they can be better understood by the general public. Since the start of 2016, about 280 science classes at universities in the U.S. and Canada have added content to 3,650 articles and generated 300 new entries receiving more than 102 million views, Davis says. Heilman cites other improvements to the crowd-sourced compendium, including a collaboration with the group Translators Without Borders to rewrite Wikipedia medical content in as many languages as possible — including Odia, a language spoken by tens of millions of people in India that is not included in Google Translate. Heilman is also proud of the Wikipedia entry for dengue fever, which was published in the peer-reviewed, open-access journal Open Medicine. Some federal agencies are also partnering with Wikipedia. The National Institutes of Health is creating an online biomedical dictionary for PubMed Health, which provides consumer-friendly summaries of research information. Usually, the NIH creates the definitions by drawing on material in its own collection, but sometimes uses Wikipedia as a source, according to NIH staff. Both organizations benefit, as the NIH will flag Heilman if it comes across something inaccurate in the Wikipedia material. "I spend a fair amount of time trying to convince my colleagues to come work on Wikipedia," Heilman says. "As a physician I believe all people deserve access to quality health care information." So, after all is said and done, how should the average person approach a web search for good consumer health information? Azzam, the UCSF psychiatrist who called for medical schools to embrace Wikipedia, says he would, nonetheless, send his patients first to government sites — like the National Institutes of Health, or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the National Library of Medicine for reliable health information. "Many of those sites have information targeting 'lay' people," he says. "Additionally there are national advocacy organizations for specific disease and/or health conditions. For example, as a psychiatrist I will refer my patients and their families to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)." And for anyone turning to Wikipedia as a health resource, Azzam advises going one more step, and clicking the "Talk" tab near the top left of every page. That will take you to a rating of how thorough and accurate Wikipedia editors think that particular page is. He also says it's a good idea to check the references that each assertion of fact in Wikipedia entries is required to link to. (You can do this by clicking on the superscript numbers at the end of a sentence.) "That gives me some idea of how much to trust the content," Azzam says. And get information from multiple sources, he recommends, to ferret out any outliers. That's "effectively a proxy measure for validity," he says. Finally, if you want to consult material that health professionals use themselves, says Azzam, try UpToDate, or PubMed, or studies in peer-reviewed journals. Health information is on a "continuum," he believes, with subscription-only, top tier scholarly journals on one end and the free, user-created Wikipedia on the other. "We believe [journal] content to be the scientific truth as we know it because content experts have peer-reviewed the manuscripts," Azzam says. "But the challenge at that extreme is gaining access to that knowledge — especially with high-cost subscription charges." That is why he's working with students to improve Wikipedia, "pulling that pole toward the other end of the spectrum." "Since so many consumers of health information online are reading that content, I want to be a part of a movement to make it as high quality as possible!" Heilman, the avid health editor, also recommends checking multiple, high-quality sources when looking for health information, paying closest attention to areas where the sources agree. Meanwhile, he'll keep carving out hours to improve Wikipedia. "As a physician, I can help one person at a time," he says. "But as a Wikipedian, I can make a difference in millions and millions of people's lives." This story was produced by KQED's health and technology blog, Future of You.


HONG KONG, Dec. 19, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- SGOCO Group, Ltd. (Nasdaq: SGOC) ("SGOCO" or the "Company"), a company focused on product design, distribution, and brand development in the display and computer product market in China as well as energy saving products and services worldwide, today announced that BOCA International Limited ("BOCA"), a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company, has signed a Project Development Agreement with Nano and Advanced Materials Institute Ltd. in Hong Kong("NAMI"). Pursuant to the agreement, parties agree to work together to research and develop a new "Micro Encapsulated Phase Change Material (mPCM) for Chiller Plant Thermal Energy Storage System", and the project deliverables shall be the property of BOCA. The Agreement is still subject to Hong Kong government's approval before it could become effective. The mPCM has advantages for the better performance of Chiller Plant Thermal Energy Storage System (the "System"). For example, the mPCM does not need large external tank for the System. It reduces building weight and can be installed to the old buildings. Additionally, it has faster response time and more efficient heat-exchange capacity. It provides new applications in high performance systems such as cooling of data centers. According to BOCA's Chief Technology Officer - Dr. Richard Chan, this is an innovative design and product, and no similar product has been created up to this date based on our limited patent research. The installation cost can reduce more than 30% by using new mPCM, and the mPCM Thermal Energy Storage system validity period will be increase up to 20 years from the date of installation. By using mPCM, we do not need to install Thermal Storage Tanks, and there will be no extra structural load and no need for plant space to be added in the building. This innovation will lead the saving energy industry to a higher level and create the new market by new applications. Regarding this agreement of BOCA which the Company acquired at the end of last year, Mr. Shi-Bin Xie, Chief Executive Officer of SGOCO, commented, "We are pleased to see the initial results of the integration of Boca and transformation of the Company to the energy saving and environmental protection business. The Company will continue its efforts to further develop such new technology and achieve our goals". SGOCO Group, Ltd. is focused on product design, brand development and distribution in the Chinese display and computer product market as well as energy saving products and services. SGOCO sells its products and services in the Chinese market and abroad. For more information about SGOCO, please visit our investor relations website: For investor and media inquiries, please contact: SGOCO Group, Ltd. Tony Zhong Vice President of Finance Tel: +852 3610 7777 This announcement contains "forward-looking" statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. These statements are made under the "safe harbor" provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. All statements, other than statements of historical fact, including, without limitation, those with respect to the objectives, plans and strategies of the Company set forth herein and those preceded by or that include the words "believe," "expect," "anticipate," "future," "will," "intend," "plan," "estimate" or similar expressions, are "forward-looking statements". Forward-looking statements in this release include, without limitation, the effectiveness of the Company's multiple-brand, multiple channel strategy and the transitioning of its product development and sales focus and to a "light-asset" model, Although the Company's management believes that such forward-looking statements are reasonable, it cannot guarantee that such expectations are, or will be, correct. These forward looking statements involve a number of risks and uncertainties, which could cause the Company's future results to differ materially from those anticipated. These forward-looking statements can change as a result of many possible events or factors not all of which are known to the Company, which may include, without limitation, our ability to have effective internal control over financial reporting; our success in designing and distributing products under brands licensed from others; management of sales trend and client mix; possibility of securing loans and other financing without efficient fixed assets as collaterals; changes in government policy in China; China's overall economic conditions and local market economic conditions; our ability to expand through strategic acquisitions and establishment of new locations; compliance with government regulations; legislation or regulatory environments; geopolitical events, and other events and/or risks outlined in SGOCO's filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, including its annual report on Form 20-F and other filings. All information provided in this press release and in the attachments is as of the date of the issuance, and SGOCO does not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statement, except as required under applicable law. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/sgoco-group-ltd-signed-a-project-development-agreement-with-nano-and-advanced-materials-institute-ltd-300380872.html


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

They are musicians and librarians, fashion designers and fitness instructors, actors, athletes and artists. They are sisters and wives, brothers and fathers, from New England and around the nation. What do they have in common? All have been affected by mental illness and its stigma, and are brought together in a beautiful and compelling new photographic exhibit debuting Friday, December 9 at Logan International Airport in Boston. The exhibit is part of a national public awareness campaign sponsored by McLean Hospital, in collaboration with Logan Airport and several mental health advocacy groups, with the goal of changing the way mental illness is perceived. Deconstructing Stigma: A Change in Thought Can Change a Life features dramatic, larger than life photographs of courageous people who have shared their stories with the hope of changing how people with psychiatric illness are viewed. “Shame and stigma are still far too prevalent when it comes to psychiatric disease and can contribute to the fear and isolation many people feel. Deconstructing Stigma is an unprecedented effort to spark conversation about behavioral and mental health,” said Scott L. Rauch, president and psychiatrist in chief of McLean Hospital, the largest psychiatric affiliate of Harvard Medical School. Sean Shinnock has lived with obsessive compulsive disorder since his teens and was the first person to volunteer for the campaign. “I want to help others who struggle with mental illness know that they are not alone,” said Sean, now 36. “I still struggle some days, but I am confident enough, hopeful enough, inspired enough and motivated enough to be a part of this life.” Also lending his voice to the campaign—literally—is Darryl “DMC” McDaniels, the founding member of the legendary hip hop group Run-DMC. Although he seemed to have everything a person could want, what the public couldn’t see was that depression and alcohol abuse were destroying his spirit and his body. “I had everything—I was the King of Rock—we were touring, making money and everyone knew who we were. But I didn’t feel right and not a day passed that I didn’t think about suicide,” Darryl said. Today, Darryl, 52, is back in the recording studio, has a best-selling book about his experience with mental illness and has become a vocal mental health advocate. Blending celebrities, such as DMC and Howie Mandel, with everyday people is a key component to the campaign because mental illness does not affect only one demographic or group. In fact, one in five Americans will be diagnosed with a mental illness this year. "Mental health affects everyone, whether we recognize it or not. I am proud that Massport has collaborated with NAMI and now McLean working to reduce stigma," said Thomas P. Glynn, CEO of Massport. "The exhibit "Deconstructing Stigma" is another example of how we are all working together to help our state and country make strides in this area." Marylou Sudders, MSW, secretary for the Executive Office of Health and Human Services for Massachusetts, is a strong advocate for increasing mental health education through campaigns such as Deconstructing Stigma. “In order for stigma to be eliminated, we must spark conversation and create an environment where people can speak openly about mental illness without the fear of being ostracized,” said Sudders, who launched StateWithout StigMA, a campaign focused on reducing stigma around opiate addiction last year. “With high visibility at a location like Logan Airport, we are doing just that, while at the same time, reaching audiences who may not otherwise think about mental health on any given day.” Despite the concerns about being labeled and risking further stigma, the volunteers in this project are sharing their stories of hope and resilience so that the public can have an opportunity to “walk in their shoes” and perhaps step away with a different view of what it’s like to have a mental illness. “Each person associated with this project is determined to make a difference in the lives of other people affected by mental illness,” said Adriana Bobinchock, senior director of Public Affairs and Communications for McLean, whose team is spearheading the campaign. “After 249 hours of photography sessions and 25,000 written words, we feel we’ve created a campaign that is meaningful and impactful, and one that has the potential to change someone’s life.” For Jamie Lenis, a mother of two, the experience of working on the Deconstructing Stigma campaign has already made a difference in her life. “My participation has allowed me to fully accept myself, my struggles, my triumphs, however small, without a hint of shame anymore,” said Jamie. “For the first time, I feel truly empowered and free. I’m not free of depression or anxiety—not wholly—but I’ve shed their damp blanket. I’m completely open to sharing with others in the hopes that my story can help in any way.” With the initial physical installation at Logan Airport in a 235-foot gallery between Terminals B and C, and an accompanying website deconstructingstigma.org, the Deconstructing Stigma campaign is expected to reach more than a million people in 2017. Plans are already underway to install similar exhibits at other airports. In addition to partnering with Logan Airport, McLean Hospital collaborated with the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, the International OCD Foundation, Massachusetts Association of Mental Health, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, and PROJECT 375 to develop Deconstructing Stigma: A Change in Thought Can Change a Life. McLean Hospital is the largest psychiatric affiliate of Harvard Medical School and a member of Partners HealthCare. For more information about McLean, visit mcleanhospital.org or follow the hospital on Facebook or Twitter. Included in media toolkit: Images of participants quoted in the release, sample image of one of the panels at Logan Airport, an image of the Logan Airport gallery and a fact sheet about mental illness.


News Article | January 5, 2016
Site: www.fastcompany.com

The Obama administration made it abundantly clear on Tuesday that those with serious mental illness should be reported to the FBI's database for background checks and prohibited from buying a gun. In the past, some providers feared that it would be a violation of an individual's privacy to report their mental illness to the FBI for inclusion on the bureau's NICS database for background checks. In many cases, such records fell through the cracks. Infamously, in 2012, Virginia Tech shooter Seung-Hui Cho was able to buy a gun despite being declared by Virginia Courts to be a danger to himself in 2005. The new amendment to HIPAA, the national standards intended to protect Americans' health information, clearly states that certain providers—such as local courts, criminal justice agencies, and some hospital directors—can and should report individuals to NICS who fall into one of the following categories: involuntarily committed to a mental institution; found incompetent to stand trial or not guilty by reason of insanity; or determined to be a danger to themselves or others. "This rule makes it as clear as day that there is no barrier or obstacle for providers to submit these records," said Jonas Oransky, legal counsel to Everytown, an organization that advocates for gun safety. This amendment is just one part of the White House's broader push to curb gun violence. On Tuesday, the president issued plans to spend $500 million to increase access to mental health care and mental health information for conducting background checks. He urged various government agencies to get involved, including the Social Security Administration. But some experts are concerned about the ongoing association between gun violence and mental health. "The great majority of people with mental illness are not violent," said Ron Honberg, legal director for the National Alliance on Mental Illness, or NAMI. "Far more often, they are the victims of violence." Studies have found that mental health problems only slightly increase the likelihood of violence (the exception is violence towards oneself). For this reason, Honberg said his organization is pushing for new legislation to be based on scientific research. Overall, however, Honberg is optimistic about the focus on mental health. Honberg said resources are in short supply to provide mental health treatment to those who need it, and to combat the stigma of mental illness. "We're seeing a heightened interest in mental health in Congress from both sides of the aisle," he said. "The infusion of new resources is very helpful."


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

ARLINGTON, Va., Dec. 7, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) applauds and celebrates the U.S. Senate's passage of HR 34, the 21st Century Cures Act, legislation that sets a foundation for improving mental health care for millions of Americans....


ARC Mercer Drama Program and NAMI Mercer featured.


News Article | December 13, 2016
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

M. Night Shyamalan’s upcoming film is about a man with 23 different personalities who abducts a group of girls and proceeds to torment them. Mental health advocates have expressed outrage at the trailer’s violent stereotypes of mental illness and its potential to stigmatize conditions like dissociative identity disorder. A petition that requests actors from the film release a public service announcement about mental health has now gathered over 15,000 signatures. Mental illness has long been a staple of American cinema. From hallucinations to depression to mania, the characteristics of mental disorders lend to storytelling, often far more than other medical conditions. With millions of viewers every year, movies have the power to shape public understanding of mental illness. As a mental health provider, I often grapple with these cinematic depictions—and the implications for my patients. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest is a classic example. Based on a novel, this 1975 film tells the story of a man who feigns mental illness to get out of prison and joins a group of patients in a psychiatric facility. In some regards, the film does well in portraying the shortcomings of mental health care during the era of institutionalization. Patients often lived under strict paternalism, locked up for months to years with little expectation of returning to normal life. Few effective psychiatric treatments existed at this time. The movie raised a key question: was the role of psychiatry to control those at the fringes of society? Still, despite winning the Academy Award for Best Picture, the movie has left lasting stigma towards mental health care. Decades later, we still haven’t shaken the images of wicked Nurse Ratched torturing innocent patients. Terrifying scenes of Jack Nicholson’s character receiving electroconvulsive therapy forever tarnished the procedure. While lobotomies had largely disappeared by the 1970s, his character is forced to undergo this surgery and turned into something of a zombie. A study published in 1983 of college students found those who watched the film developed considerably more negative attitudes towards people with mental health issues. Around that time, an entire genre of horror films based on mental illness was emerging. After Hitchcock’s Psycho (1960) introduced us to the terrors of mentally unstable motel owners, the stereotype of violent mental patients exploded in movies. In Halloween (1978), Michael Myers escapes an asylum and goes on a killing spree. Since the 1980s, serial killer Freddy Krueger has terrified audiences of the Nightmare on Elm Street franchise—Krueger’s mother was said to have been gang-raped in a mental hospital, dubbing Freddy the “bastard son of a hundred maniacs.” Today, we still see damaging stereotypes of mental illness all the time in mainstream cinema. Leonardo DiCaprio’s character investigates a frightening asylum for the “criminally insane” in Shutter Island (2010). In The Ward (2010), Amber Heard’s character and others struggle to escape straitjackets, electroconvulsive therapy, and the vengeance of a former patient. As we’ve seen, mental health advocates fear Shyamalan’s Split will soon join this group. Research suggests the portrayal of mental illness in films is overwhelmingly negative—and may leave lasting impressions on audiences.  In a 2001 survey of community college students, more than 90 percent of respondents reported learning about mental illness from movies. A 2004 study found 85 percent of animated Disney films included references to mental illness, most often in a denigrating manner. Fortunately, not all films perpetuate stereotypes against people with mental health conditions. Some help us better understand the experience of mental illness, fostering awareness and empathy towards those in need. In 2001, A Beautiful Mind captivated the country with the biography of legendary mathematician John Nash. Nash, who was diagnosed with schizophrenia, won a Nobel Prize for his work in economics, and the film showed us how even the most influential leaders can grapple with mental illness. Many in the mental health community praised the film’s depiction of schizophrenia, calling it “compassionate” and “historic.” Another movie that realistically portrays mental illness is Michael Clayton (2007). In the film, Tom Wilkinson plays a senior partner at a prestigious law firm who suffers from bipolar disorder. His opening monologue is an eerily accurate depiction of mania, reminding me of patients I’ve cared for. The film takes on issues like medication non-adherence and the legal framework of involuntary commitment. Perhaps my favorite film that addresses mental illness is Take Shelter (2011). Michael Shannon plays a rural father with a family history of schizophrenia who slowly descends into madness. The film touches on key issues in mental health care, such as the difficulties in maintaining family life, stigma in the community, and limited access to providers. Bob Carolla, a spokesman for the National Alliance on Mental Illness, summed the film up best: “Too often when a movie company contacts NAMI to say they have released a film about schizophrenia, I cringe. More often than not, the film involves stereotypes and violence. But Take Shelter isn’t one of those films.” The medical community is recognizing the impact of movies on public attitudes towards mental illness. Psychiatry departments at Baylor, Drexel, and Harvard, among others, have founded movie clubs that examine mental health themes in cinema. Medical school faculty have promoted film viewings as a way of teaching doctors-in-training about topics in mental health. In the meantime, mental illness seems to be playing a starring role in more and more movies. Whether it’s Silver Linings Playbook (2012) or Side Effects (2013), Touched With Fire (2015) or now Split (2016), filmmakers walk a fine line between entertainment and reality when their stories hinge on mental health issues. These portraits influence public attitudes towards illnesses shared by millions of Americans, shifting the landscape of mental health care in this country. At a time when mental health needs have never been greater, yet people remain afraid to speak up, we could sure use a helping hand from Hollywood.


News Article | December 24, 2016
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

LOS ANGELES, CA, December 24, 2016 /24-7PressRelease/ -- NAMIWalks Los Angeles County, the largest mental health fundraising walk in Los Angeles, announced this week that the Walk raised $442,297. "This is one of the three largest NAMIWalks in the nation," said Shelley Hoffman, NAMIWalks Manager. "We are at 98% of our $450,000 goal and we are still accepting donations." The annual NAMIWalks event raises funds for FREE programs and services, bringing the NAMI message of HOPE to more people. The walk is a combined effort for all twelve Los Angeles County National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) affiliates. The Honorable Alex Padilla, California Secretary of State, and his family joined over 3000 walkers from twelve local NAMI affiliates and from every corner of Los Angeles County on October 1st at Grand Park in Downtown Los Angeles for the walk. Emmy-nominated actress Mayim Bialik, star of the CBS hit The Big Bang Theory, raised $12,503 and Carly Chaikin, co-star of award-winning show Mr. Robot, raised $10,858. Both actors have a strong personal commitment to mental health, and both reached many fans who might not have been aware of NAMI otherwise. "NAMIWalks Los Angeles County and the 12 local NAMI affiliates are grateful for their support and thankful for all efforts at busting stigma and raising awareness about mental health issues," said NAMI Los Angeles County Executive Director Brittney Weissman. The theme for the 2016 NAMIWalks was Lights, Camera, Action on Mental Health! A series of PSAs in support of NAMI and NAMIWalks were recorded by Bialik and Chaikin. The PSAs remind viewers that words often used to describe someone with a mental health condition, such as nutjob, OCD and schizo, can be painful. "In a country where one in five people are affected by a mental health condition, it's time for all of us to step up and change the conversation," Bialik says in the PSA. Bialik then calls on viewers to see the person, not the condition. Bialik's virtual team, Grok Nation for NAMI, allowed fans and friends to support NAMIWalks by donating online. She also made a national fundraising appeal through a specially made video for NAMI. Chaikin attended the walk and mobilized fans with social media fundraising challenges, and both stars made a strong commitment to messaging and fundraising on behalf of NAMI Los Angeles County. NAMI is the nation's largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to improving the lives of individuals and families affected by mental illness. NAMI works to end stigma by bringing awareness to mental health, providing support, educating the public and advocating for equal care. Mental illness can be treated, and people living with mental illness can recover to live fulfilling lives. To learn more about how NAMI can help, visit namilacc.org. All NAMI programs and services are free of charge, for individuals living with mental illness and families and friends who care for them.

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