Naju Foundation of Natural Dyeing Culture

Naju, South Korea

Naju Foundation of Natural Dyeing Culture

Naju, South Korea
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Boo H.-O.,Chosun University | Hwang S.-J.,Chonnam National University | Bae C.-S.,Chonnam National University | Park S.-H.,Chonnam National University | And 2 more authors.
Industrial Crops and Products | Year: 2012

Antioxidant activities, total polyphenols and flavonoids, and antimicrobial effects in some plant pigments were determined in order to use these natural materials for cosmetics. The DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl radical scavenging activity, % of control at maximum plants extract concentrations of 2500. mg/L) in the thirteen natural plant pigments (black rice, purple sweet potato, yellow bitter melon, yellow paprika, red cabbage, yellow gardenia, blue gardenia, Chinese foxglove, mulberry leave, onion peel, grape peel, mulberry and red beet) ranged from 88.9% for red cabbage to 18.0% for blue gardenia. The highest total polyphenol content (404.2 μg/ml) was measured in the onion peel pigment, and the lowest was in Chinese foxglove pigment (11.4 μg/ml). The red cabbage had the highest total flavonoid amount which was 95.5 μg/ml. The antimicrobial activities of the natural plant pigments were evaluated using the agar diffusion method. Most of the natural pigments for Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, Escherichia coli, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus showed the clear zone formation of growth inhibition. Purple sweet potato, mulberry, mulberry leaf, grape peel, and blue gardenia showed high antimicrobial activities. These findings suggest that the pigments derived from natural plants had high biological activities, and exhibited different properties depending on each kind of pigments. Therefore these plant resources, having active functional components, can be used as excellent materials for natural cosmetics and food supplements. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Kim K.-S.,Chonnam National University | Hwang W.-G.,Chonnam National University | Jang H.-G.,Naju Foundation of Natural Dyeing Culture | Heo B.-G.,Naju Foundation of Natural Dyeing Culture | And 6 more authors.
LWT - Food Science and Technology | Year: 2012

There are a few investigations on Indigo (Polygonum tinctorium Ait.), as a medicinal plant. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the contents of bioactive compounds, antioxidant and antiproliferative activities and to compare with another medicinal plant Prolipid. It was found that the bioactive compounds from different parts of Indigo water extracts varied (P < 0.05): polyphenols and flavonoids were significantly higher in Prolipid, flavanols in Indigo seeds, and vitamin C similar in Indigo leaves and Prolipid. The antioxidant activity by ABTS, FRAP, CUPRAC and DPPH assays was significantly different (P < 0.05): the highest in Prolipid, following by Indigo mature leaves. DPPH kinetic measurements compared, distinguished and discriminated the antiradical activity among Indigo and Prolipid water extracts by multivariate analysis. The interaction between polyphenol extracts of Indigo mature leaves and BSA showed that Indigo has a strong ability, as other medicinal plants, to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA by forming complexes. In conclusion, for the first time Indigo mature leaves were analyzed and compared with widely consumed Prolipid. The relatively high content of bioactive compounds, positive antioxidant, fluorescence and antiproliferative properties of Indigo justify the use of this plant as a new source of valuable antioxidants. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Heo B.-G.,Naju Foundation of Natural Dyeing Culture | Jang H.-G.,Naju Foundation of Natural Dyeing Culture | Cho J.Y.,Jeonnam Provincial College | Namiesnik J.,Technical University of Gdansk | And 6 more authors.
Industrial Crops and Products | Year: 2013

The aim of this study was to assess the contents of indigo's bioactive compounds, its antioxidant and anticancer activities in acetone, hexane and DMSO extracts and to compare the overall bioactivity with another more used medicinal plant named prolipid. It was found that the contents of the bioactive compounds in the studied extracts from different parts of indigo plant varied (P<. 0.05): the significantly highest content of polyphenols and flavonoids was in DMSO extract of prolipid, flavanols - in acetone extract of brown seeds (P<. 0.05 in both cases) and tannins - in DMSO extract of green leaves, but not significantly (P> 0.05). Also the level of antioxidant activity was different: the highest antioxidant activity of all studied samples was in prolipid: according to ABTS, FRAP and CUPRAC tests in DMSO extract (P<. 0.05 in all 3 cases), and only in acetone extract according to DPPH was not significant (P> 0.05). The correlations between polyphenol compounds and the antioxidant activities were relatively high. DPPH kinetic measurements were used to compare and distinguish the antiradical activity among indigo extracts by multivariate analysis. The FT-IR spectroscopy evaluated the presence of polyphenols. The interaction between DMSO polyphenol extracts of indigo plant and BSA showed that indigo has a strong ability as other medicinal plants such as prolipid to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA by forming complexes and was measured by 3-dimensional fluorescence (3D-FL). The highest anticancer activity was in prolipid in concentrations of 800 μg/mL against Calu-6, following by indigo brown leaves. In conclusion, organic extracts of indigo brown leaves were analyzed for their antioxidant and anticancer activities and compared with prolipid, using polyphenols composition, antioxidant activities and fluorescence properties. The indigo ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA, relatively high content of phenolic compounds and anticancer properties can be used as medicinal plant. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Haruenkit R.,King Mondkuts Institute of Technology Ladkrabang | Poovarodom S.,King Mondkuts Institute of Technology Ladkrabang | Vearasilp S.,Chiang Mai University | Namiesnik J.,Technical University of Gdansk | And 6 more authors.
Food Chemistry | Year: 2010

The aim of this investigation was to compare the bioactive and nutrient compounds, fatty acids, and antioxidant and antiproliferative activities of Mon Thong durian at different stages of ripening. It was found that the total polyphenols, flavonoids, flavanols, ascorbic acid, tannins and the antioxidant activity determined by four assays (CUPRAC, DPPH, ABTS and FRAP) differed in immature, mature, ripe and overripe samples. The content of polyphenols and antioxidant activity were the highest in overripe durian, flavonoids were the highest in ripe durian, and flavanols and antiproliferative activity were the highest in mature durian (p < 0.05). FTIR spectra of polyphenols, HPLC profiles of fatty acids, the antioxidant and antiproliferative activities can be used as indicators to characterise different stages of durian ripening. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Chon S.-U.,Chosun University | Boo H.-O.,Chosun University | Heo B.-G.,Naju Foundation of Natural Dyeing Culture | Gorinstein S.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem
International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition | Year: 2012

Anthocyanin content and the activities of polyphenol oxidase (PPO), peroxidase (POD) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and their relationships were determined in the leaves of six lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cultivars, exposed for 6 weeks to alternating three different day/night temperatures. Anthocyanin content was found to be highest at 20/13°C, followed by 25/20°C and 30/25°C, showing accumulation of anthocyanin at low temperatures. Activities of PPO and PAL were also found to be highest at low day/night temperatures, whereas the POD activity was decreased at low day/night temperatures. The most significant positive correlation existed between anthocyanin content and PPO activity (r 2 = 0.71). The results suggest that various day/night temperature regimes affect anthocyanin content and the activities of PPO, POD and PAL in lettuce. © 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.


Boo H.-O.,Chosun University | Heo B.-G.,Naju Foundation of Natural Dyeing Culture | Gorinstein S.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem | Chon S.-U.,Chosun University
Plant Science | Year: 2011

The contents of two bioactive compounds (polyphenols and flavonoids) and their antioxidant and enzyme activities were determined in the leaves of six lettuce (Latuca sativa L.) cultivars subjected to 4 different day/night temperatures for 6 weeks.The total polyphenol and anthocyanin contents and the corresponding antioxidant activities were the highest at 13/10. °C and 20/13. °C, followed by 25/20. °C and 30/25. °C. The enzymatic activities of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) were also the highest at low day/night temperatures, but the peroxidase (POD) activity was decreased at low day/night temperatures and increased at high day/night temperatures.The most significant positive correlation existed between anthocyanin content and PPO activity, total polyphenols and their antioxidant activities. The results showed that at relatively low temperatures, lettuce plants have a high antioxidant and enzymatic status. These results provide additional information for the lettuce growers. © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Boo H.-O.,Chosun University | Heo B.-G.,Naju Foundation of Natural Dyeing Culture | Gorinstein S.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Food Analytical Methods | Year: 2012

The enzyme activities in different fractions of Dioscorea japonica Thunb. and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl radical scavenging activity in 15 natural plant pigments from black rice, purple sweet potato, yellow bitter melon, yellow paprika, red cabbage, yellow gardenia, blue gardenia, Chinese foxglove, mulberry leave, onion peel, grape peel, mulberry, red beet, gromwell, and cactus were determined. The antioxidant activity in the cosmetic composition of mulberry leaves, grape peel, mulberry, and red cabbage pigments was relatively high in comparison with all other studied plants. Enzyme activities in investigated plants were evaluated as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). The cosmetic composition of mulberry leaf pigment had the highest SOD enzyme activity of 67. 1% while onion peel pigment showed the lowest SOD enzyme activity of 15. 3%. The activity of CAT and APX from cosmetic composition of natural plant pigments has also been investigated. Both CAT and APX showed higher values in the cactus, mulberry, and red cabbage cosmetic compositions in comparison with other plant pigments. The cosmetic composition in EtOAc extract of D. japonica Thunb. had the highest SOD enzyme activity while the BuOH and EtOH extracts were comparatively low. CAT and APX activities showed significantly high values in EtOH and EtOAc extracts. The antioxidant enzyme activities of D. japonica Thunb. differ significantly in different plant pigments during their extraction. In conclusion, we showed that the plant pigments and D. japonica Thunb. had the potent biological activities. Therefore, these plant resources having anti-aging components could be good materials for development of source of natural cosmetics. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Park Y.-S.,Mokpo National University | Lee M.-K.,Mokpo National University | Heo B.-G.,Naju Foundation of Natural Dyeing Culture | Ham K.-S.,Mokpo National University | And 3 more authors.
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition | Year: 2010

This study was conducted in order to compare the nutrient and chemical contents of two Korean teas: traditional Chungtaejeon tea (CTJ) with that of green tea (GT). Main bioactive compounds and the antioxidant activities using four radical scavenging assays (ABTS, CUPRAC, FRAP and DPPH) in methanol and acetone extracts of both teas were determined. It was found that the contents of vitamin C, amino acids and total nitrogen in CTJ were lower than that of GT (p<0.05). Caffeine, reducing sugar and chlorophyll contents in CTJ were similar to GT. Catechin (C), epicatechin (EC), and epigallocatechin (EGC) contents were lower in CTJ than in green tea (p<0.05), but gallocatechin (GC), epicatechin gallate (ECG), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and catechin gallate (CG) showed no significant differences between CTJ and GT (p≥0.05). The contents of polyphenols, flavonoids, flavanols and tannins in CTJ methanol were 229.30±11.3 mg GAE/g dry weight (DW), 15.24 ± 0.8 mg CE/g DW, 109.10±5.1 mg CE/g DW and 25.68±1.2 mg CE/g DW, respectively, and significantly higher than in acetone extracts (p<0.05). Flavonoids (quercetin and kaempferol) were higher in GT than in CTJ and myricetin was higher in CTJ (p<0.05). Threonine and aspartic acid was lower, and glutamic acid was higher in CTJ compared with GT (p<0.05). Free amino acid content in CTJ and GT showed no significant difference. Potassium and magnesium in CTJ were lower compared to GT, but no significant difference was found for iron, manganese and calcium. Also, the level of the antioxidant activity by all four used assays was significantly higher in CTJ and in methanol was higher than in acetone extracts (p<0.05). In conclusion, traditional fermented Korean tea Chungtaejeon contains high quantities of bioactive compounds and possesses high antioxidant activity. The contents of the bioactive compounds and the levels of antioxidant activities are significantly higher in methanol than in acetone extracts. 3-D fluorescence and FTIR- spectroscopy showed slight differences between the two investigated tea samples and can be used as additional tools for identification of polyphenols. Both studied teas can be recommended as a source of bioactive compounds. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Heo B.-G.,Naju Foundation of Natural Dyeing Culture | Park Y.-J.,Wonkwang University | Park Y.-S.,Mokpo National University | Bae J.-H.,Wonkwang University | And 4 more authors.
Industrial Crops and Products | Year: 2014

The water, methanol and ethanol extracts of flowers, leaves, stems, and seeds from indigo (Polygonum tinctorium Lour.) were tested in vitro to verify cytotoxic effects on human renal cell line (HEK 293) and inhibitory effects on the proliferation of colon cancer cell line (HCT-116), cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa), liver carcinoma cells (Hep3B), breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7), laryngeal cancer cell line (SNU-1066), and gastric cancer cell line (SNU-601), in order to further increase the use of the indigo plant. Significant differences were found in polyphenols and flavonoids in extracts of different parts of indigo. The highest amount of total polyphenols (22.94±2.18 and 22.81±2.04mgGAE/g DW) were found in methanol extracts of leaves and flowers and flavonoids (4.02±0.43, 3.70±0.34 and 3.28±0.26mgCE/gDW) - in methanol extracts of leaves, flowers and seeds. The highest antioxidant capacities by ABTS+ (99.12±9.18 and 96.35±8.75μMTE/gDW) and CUPRAC (78.37±7.86 and 86.22±8.43μMTE/gDW) were also found in methanol extracts of leaves and flowers. The correlation coefficient (R2) between antioxidant capacities and polyphenols of indigo parts in different extracts varied from 0.7142 to 0.9765, showing the highest correlation for leaves and flowers in methanol extracts. The survival rates at a concentration of 800mg/L for human renal cell line (HEK 293) in indigo plant water extracts from flowers and stems were 17.58%±9.29 and 61.78%±11.00 and in methanol extract of leaves and seeds estimated as 36.47%±18.70 and 28.7%±16.68, respectively. The extracts of stem prolonged the overall survival of cancer cells. The survival rates at a concentration of 800mg/L of colon cancer cell line (HCT-116) and cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) in the ethanol extract of indigo flowers were 5.10%±0.32 and 8.85%±0.11, respectively, and in seeds on HeLa cells was 16.93%±3.09. The survival rates of HeLa and HCT-116 in methanol extracts of indigo leaves at a concentration of 800mg/L were 6.89%±0.53 and 13.22%±8.51, respectively. Proliferative and antioxidant activities were correlated. The highest R2 between the antioxidant capacities and survival rates was in methanol extracts of leaves on HeLa cells. Therefore, investigation in vitro revealed that the extracts of the indigo plant were found to be effective in suppressing the proliferation of cancer cells, although the results varied depending on the different parts of P. tinctorium Lour., the concentrations of solvent and extracts, the antioxidant activities and the types of cancers. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jeonnam Bioindustry Foundation, Naju Foundation of Natural Dyeing Culture, Wonkwang University and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Plant foods for human nutrition (Dordrecht, Netherlands) | Year: 2016

The scope of this research was to determine the bioactive composition, antioxidant, binding, and anti-proliferative properties of red sweet paprika growing under artificial light. The amounts of carotenoids, chlorophyll, polyphenols, tannins, and flavonoids in red paprika (RP), cultivated in Korea, before and after light treatments under high pressure sodium (HPS) and lighting emitting plasma (LEP) lamps (RPControl, RPHPS, RPLEP), were analyzed in water (W) and ethanolic extracts (Et). Spectroscopic, radical scavenging assays, fluorescence and cytotoxicity measurements were applied. The results of this study showed that total chlorophyll and carotenes were the highest in RPHPS (10.501.02 and 33.903.26g/g dry weight (DW)). The strongest antioxidant capacity (M TE/g DW) in a 2, 2-azino-bis (3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS(+)) assay was in RPControlEt (24.342.36), in a ferric-reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) assay in RPHPSW (27.082.4) and in a cupric reducing antioxidant (CUPRAC) in RPLEPW (70.997.11). The paprika ethanolic extracts showed lower values in their bioactivity than the water ones. The binding and cytotoxicity abilities of extracted polyphenols correlated with their amounts. LEP treatment is better for plant growth characteristics than other conventional treatments. The investigated paprika samples can be used as a source of antioxidants.

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