Nagoya City Public Health Research Institute

Nagoya-shi, Japan

Nagoya City Public Health Research Institute

Nagoya-shi, Japan
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Suzuki Y.,Mie University | Tada-Oikawa S.,Mie University | Ichihara G.,Nagoya University | Yabata M.,Mie University | And 4 more authors.
Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology | Year: 2014

Metal oxide nanoparticles are widely used in industry, cosmetics, and biomedicine. However, the effects of exposure to these nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system remain unknown. The present study investigated the effects of nanosized TiO2 and ZnO particles on the migration and adhesion of monocytes, which are essential processes in atherosclerogenesis, using an in vitro set-up of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1). We also examined the effects of exposure to nanosized metal oxide particles on macrophage cholesterol uptake and foam cell formation. The 16-hour exposure to ZnO particles increased the level of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and induced the migration of THP-1 monocyte mediated by increased MCP-1. Exposure to ZnO particles also induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Moreover, exposure to ZnO particles, but not TiO2 particles, upregulated the expression of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL and increased cholesterol uptake in THP-1 monocytes/macrophages. In the present study, we found that exposure to ZnO particles increased macrophage cholesterol uptake, which was mediated by an upregulation of membrane scavenger receptors of modified LDL. These results suggest that nanosized ZnO particles could potentially enhance atherosclerogenesis and accelerate foam cell formation. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


Shiota M.,Kitano Hospital | Saitou K.,Kitano Hospital | Mizumoto H.,Kitano Hospital | Agata N.,Nagoya City Public Health Research Institute | And 7 more authors.
Pediatrics | Year: 2010

Bacillus cereus is recognized as a major pathogenic bacterium that causes food poisoning and produces gastrointestinal diseases of 2 types: emetic and diarrheal. The emetic type, which is often linked to pasta and rice, arises from a preformed toxin, cereulide, in food. Rapid and accurate diagnostic methods for this emetic toxin are important but are limited. Here we describe 3 patients with B cereus food poisoning in which cereulide was detected and measured sequentially. Three family members began to vomit frequently 30 minutes after consuming reheated fried rice. After 6 hours, a 1-year-old brother died of acute encephalopathy. A 2-year-old sister who presented with unconsciousness recovered rapidly after plasma exchange and subsequent hemodialysis. Their mother recovered soon by fluid therapy. From leftover fried rice and the children's stomach contents, B cereus was isolated. Serum cereulide was detected in both children; it decreased to an undetected level in the sister. These cases highlight the importance of measuring the value of cereulide, which would reflect the severity of B cereus emetic food poisoning. The cases also suggest the possible role of blood-purification therapy in severe cases.


Guo P.,Yokkaichi University | Guo P.,Mie University | Piao F.,Dalian Medical University | Sakai K.,Nagoya City Public Health Research Institute | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health | Year: 2013

This study assessed subjective symptoms related to indoor concentrations of chemicals among residents in a housing estate in Dalian, China, where indoor air pollution by interior decoration materials has recently become a major health problem. Fifty-nine males and 50 females were surveyed for their symptoms related to sick building syndrome. Formaldehyde (HCHO), NO.2, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in their dwellings were collected using a diffusion sampler and measured by GC/MS. For residents with one or more symptoms in the past, HCHO, butanol or 1,2-dichloroethane concentrations were significantly greater in their bedrooms or kitchens compared with those of subjects without previous symptoms. For residents with one or more symptoms at the time of the study, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, xylene, butanol, methyl isobutyl ketone, and styrene concentrations in their bedrooms or kitchens were significantly greater compared with those of residents without symptoms. HCHO, NO.2, and VOCs were detected in all rooms, but their levels were lower than the guideline values except for HCHO in two rooms. Chemical substances from interior decoration materials at indoor air levels lower than their guideline values might have affected the health status of residents.


Sugiura J.,Nagoya City Public Health Research Institute | Nakajima M.,Nagoya City Public Health Research Institute
Food Additives and Contaminants - Part A Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure and Risk Assessment | Year: 2017

A simple HPLC method was developed for the simultaneous analysis of nine preservatives in food including benzoic acid, sorbic acid, dehydroacetic acid, methyl paraben, ethyl paraben, isopropyl paraben, propyl paraben, isobutyl paraben and butyl paraben. Samples were extracted with 60 v/v% methanol containing poly-aluminium chloride (PAC) and sodium hydroxide prior to analysis. PAC, which is normally used as a coagulant, was successfully applied to remove interfering substances from the samples. The method showed good linearity with coefficients of determination higher than 0.999 over the range of 0.2–5 µg ml–1 for all target preservatives. LOQs of the method were in the range of 0.002–0.008 g kg–1. Method performance was evaluated in a variety of foods demonstrated to have quantitative recoveries of 81.7–102.5% with satisfactory intra-day precision of < 3.7% and inter-day precision of < 6.5%. The method also demonstrated applicability to real foods containing preservatives. © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group


Abe Y.,Japan National Institute of Health Sciences | Mutsuga M.,Japan National Institute of Health Sciences | Ohno H.,Nagoya City Public Health Research Institute | Kawamura Y.,Japan National Institute of Health Sciences | Akiyama H.,Japan National Institute of Health Sciences
PLoS ONE | Year: 2016

Small amounts of cyclic monomers and oligomers are present in polyamide (PA)-based kitchen utensils. In this study, we isolated eight PA-based cyclic monomers and oligomers from kitchen utensils made from PA6 (a polymer of ε-caprolactam) and PA66 (a polymer of 1,6-diaminohexane and adipic acid). Their structures were identified using high-resolution mass spectrometry and 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and their residual levels in PA-based kitchen utensils and degree of migration into food simulants were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry using purchased PA6 monomer and isolated PA66 monomers, and isolated PA6 and PA66 oligomers as calibration standards. Their total residual levels among 23 PA-based kitchen utensils made from PA6, PA66, and copolymers of PA6 and PA66 (PA6/66) ranged from 7.8 to 20 mg/g. Using water, 20% ethanol, and olive oil as food simulants, the total migration levels of the PA monomers and oligomers ranged from 0.66 to 100 μg/cm2 under most examined conditions. However, the total migration levels of the PA66 monomer and oligomers from PA66 and PA6/66 kitchen utensils into 20% ethanol at 95°C were very high (1,700 and 2,200 μg/cm2, respectively) due to swelling by high-temperature ethanol. © 2016 Abe et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Onoda A.,Nagoya City Public Health Research Institute | Asanoma M.,Nagoya City Public Health Research Institute | Nukaya H.,University of Shizuoka
Bioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry | Year: 2016

To identify the major mutagen in pyroligneous acid (PA), 10 wood and 10 bamboo pyroligneous acids were examined using the Ames test in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA100 and TA98. Subsequently, the mutagenic dicarbonyl compounds (DCs), glyoxal, methylglyoxal (MG), and diacetyl in PA were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography, and the mutagenic contribution ratios for each DC were calculated relative to the mutagenicity of PA. Eighteen samples were positive for mutagens and showed the strongest mutagenicity in TA100 in the absence of S9 mix. MG had the highest mutagenic contribution ratio, and its presence was strongly correlated with the specific mutagenicity of PA. These data indicate that MG is the major mutagen in PA. © 2016 Japan Society for Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Agrochemistry.


PubMed | University of Shizuoka and Nagoya City Public Health Research Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Bioscience, biotechnology, and biochemistry | Year: 2016

To identify the major mutagen in pyroligneous acid (PA), 10 wood and 10 bamboo pyroligneous acids were examined using the Ames test in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA100 and TA98. Subsequently, the mutagenic dicarbonyl compounds (DCs), glyoxal, methylglyoxal (MG), and diacetyl in PA were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography, and the mutagenic contribution ratios for each DC were calculated relative to the mutagenicity of PA. Eighteen samples were positive for mutagens and showed the strongest mutagenicity in TA100 in the absence of S9 mix. MG had the highest mutagenic contribution ratio, and its presence was strongly correlated with the specific mutagenicity of PA. These data indicate that MG is the major mutagen in PA.


Khalequzzaman M.,Nagoya University | Kamijima M.,Nagoya City University | Sakai K.,Nagoya City Public Health Research Institute | Ebara T.,Nagoya City University | And 2 more authors.
Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine | Year: 2011

Objectives: Indoor air pollutants from biomass combustion pose a risk for respiratory diseases in children. It is plausible that distinct differences in the indoor air quality (IAQ) exist between urban and rural areas in developing countries since the living environment between these two areas are quite different. We have investigated possible differences in IAQ in urban and rural Dhaka, Bangladesh and the association of such differences with the incidence of respiratory and some non-respiratory symptoms in children of families using biomass fuel. Methods: Indoor air concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO 2), dust particles, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and nitrogen dioxide were measured once in the winter and once in the summer of 2008. Health data on 51 urban and 51 rural children under 5 years of age from 51 families in each area were collected once a week starting in the winter and continuing to the summer of 2008. Results: Mean concentrations of CO, CO 2,, dust particles, and major VOCs were significantly higher in urban kitchens than in rural ones (p < 0.05). The incidence rate ratio (IRR) suggests that compared to the urban children, the children in the rural area suffered significantly more from respiratory symptoms [IRR 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.62-1.64], skin itchiness (IRR 3.3, 95% CI 1.9-5.7), and diarrhea (IRR 1.8, 95% CI 1.4-2.4), while fewer experienced fever (IRR 0.5, 95% CI 0.4-0.6). No difference was observed for other symptoms. Conclusions: We found lower IAQ in the homes of urban biomass fuel-users compared to rural ones in Bangladesh but could not attribute the occurrence of respiratory symptoms among children to the measured IAQ. Other factors may be involved. © 2011 The Japanese Society for Hygiene.


Sakai K.,Nagoya City Public Health Research Institute
[Nippon kōshū eisei zasshi] Japanese journal of public health | Year: 2010

This study aimed to clarify indoor air pollution levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), especially 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (2E1H) in large buildings after revising of the Act on Maintenance of Sanitation in Buildings in 2002. We measured indoor air VOC concentrations in 57 (97%) out of a total of 61 large buildings completed within one year in half of the area of Nagoya, Japan, from 2003 through 2007. Airborne concentrations of 13 carbonyl compounds were determined with diffusion samplers and high-performance liquid chromatography, and of the other 32 VOCs with diffusion samplers and gas chromatography with a mass spectrometer. Formaldehyde was detected in all samples of indoor air but the concentrations were lower than the indoor air quality standard value set in Japan (100 microg/m3). Geometric mean concentrations of the other major VOCs, namely toluene, xylene, ethylbenzene, styrene, p-dichlorobenzene and acetaldehyde were also low. 2E1H was found to be one of the predominating VOCs in indoor air of large buildings. A few rooms in a small number of buildings surveyed showed high concentrations of 2E1H, while low concentrations were observed in most rooms of those buildings as well as in other buildings. It was estimated that about 310 buildings had high indoor air pollution levels of 2E1H, with increase during the 5 years from 2003 in Japan. Indoor air pollution levels of VOCs in new large buildings are generally good, although a few rooms in a small number of buildings showed high concentrations in 2E1H, a possible causative chemical in sick building symptoms. Therefore, 2E1H needs particular attention as an important indoor air pollutant.


PubMed | Nagoya City Public Health Research Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Shokuhin eiseigaku zasshi. Journal of the Food Hygienic Society of Japan | Year: 2015

An HPLC method for determination of sodium saccharin and acesulfame potassium was newly developed, employing coagulant pretreatment to remove particles dispersed in the sample extract. The method showed recovery of 96-101% for both analytes with a repeatability of less than 1% and a reproducibility of less than 2%. The limit of quantification for sodium saccharin was 0.025 g/kg and that for acesulfame potassium was 0.025 g/kg. Only about 20 min was required for preparation of the test solution, whereas the dialysis method takes much longer.

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