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Nagasaki-shi, Japan

Higashijima U.,Intensive Care Unit | Terao Y.,Intensive Care Unit | Ichinomiya T.,Intensive Care Unit | Miura K.,Intensive Care Unit | And 2 more authors.
Anaesthesia | Year: 2010

The aim of this study was to determine the effect of thiamylal and propofol on heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) interval during anaesthetic induction. We studied 50 patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Patients were administered 3 μg.kg-1 fentanyl and were randomly allocated to receive 5 mg.kg-1 thiamylal or 1.5 mg.kg-1 propofol as an induction agent. Tracheal intubation was performed after vecuronium administration. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure, bispectral index score, and 12-lead electrocardiogram were recorded at the following time points: just before (T1) and 2 min after (T2) fentanyl administration; 2 min after anaesthetic administration (T3); 2.5 min after vecuronium injection (T4); and 2 min after intubation (T5). Thiamylal prolonged (p < 0.0001), but propofol shortened (p < 0.0001), the QTc interval. © 2010 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland. Source


Osaki M.,Nagasaki University | Tatsuki K.,Takeda Pharmaceutical | Hashikawa T.,Nagasaki University | Norimatsu T.,Nagasaki University | And 6 more authors.
Osteoporosis International | Year: 2012

Summary: A 36-month observational study compared the incidence of unaffected side hip fracture in Japanese female osteoporosis patients with a history of hip fracture between 173 patients receiving risedronate and 356 risedronate-untreated controls. New hip fractures were significantly less frequent in the risedronate group, suggesting a preventive effect in high-risk patients. Introduction: The purpose of this study was to investigate the preventive effect of risedronate on second hip fracture immediately following a first hip fracture in Japanese female osteoporosis patients with unilateral hip fracture. Methods: We conducted a prospective matched cohort study in 184 patients treated with risedronate and 445 patients not receiving risedronate after discharge from hospital. Both groups were followed-up for 36 months, and the incidence of unaffected side hip fracture and the frequency of adverse events were assessed. Results: Efficacy could be investigated in 173 patients from the risedronate group and 356 patients from the control group. Hip fracture was detected in 5 and 32 patients, respectively. Kaplan-Meier estimates of the 36-month fracture incidence were 4.3% in the risedronate group and 13.1% in the control group (P = 0.010, log-rank test). The hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) obtained by univariate and multivariate analysis were 0.310 (0.121-0.796) and 0.218 (0.074-0.639), respectively, indicating a significantly lower incidence of unaffected side hip fracture in the risedronate group. Adverse events occurred in 38 patients (48 events) from the risedronate group and 94 patients (108 events) from the control group, with serious adverse events in 21 patients (26 events) and 78 patients (88 events), respectively. Conclusions: No significant differences were observed between the two groups. The incidence of unaffected side hip fracture was significantly lower in the risedronate group. Accordingly, risedronate may have a preventive effect on hip fracture in high-risk Japanese female osteoporosis patients for fracture with a history of unilateral hip fracture. © 2011 The Author(s). Source


Kawahara Y.,Nagasaki Rosai Hospital
Japanese Journal of Clinical Radiology | Year: 2014

We have selected clinical questions, which are related to imaging modalities frequently used for the diagnosis of common musculoskeletal diseases. Many radiologists, who are not familiar with musculoskeletal radiology, are compelled to accept most of the imaging examinations ordered by other physicians, even if they seem inappropriate. However, it is one of the duties of radiologists to tell them the appropriate indication of imaging modalities based on the evidence. We hope that this guideline will assist radiologists in choice of adequate imaging modalities. Source


Matsudaira K.,Clinical Research Center for Occupational Musculoskeletal Disorders | Matsudaira K.,Tokyo Medical University | Konishi H.,Nagasaki Rosai Hospital | Miyoshi K.,Spine Center | And 3 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

Study Design: Two-year, prospective cohort data from the Japan epidemiological research of occupation-related back pain study in urban settings were used for this analysis. Objective: To examine the association between aggravated low back pain and psychosocial factors among Japanese workers with mild low back pain. Summary of Background Data: Although psychosocial factors are strongly indicated as yellow flags of low back pain (LBP) leading to disability, the association between aggravated LBP and psychosocial factors has not been well assessed in Japanese workers. Methods: At baseline, 5,310 participants responded to a self-administered questionnaire including questions about individual characteristics, ergonomic work demands, and work-related psychosocial factors (response rate: 86.5%), with 3,811 respondents completing the 1-year follow-up questionnaire. The target outcome was aggravation of mild LBP into persistent LBP during the follow-up period. Incidence was calculated for the participants with mild LBP during the past year at baseline. Logistic regression was used to explore risk factors associated with persistent LBP. Results: Of 1,675 participants who had mild LBP during the preceding year, 43 (2.6%) developed persistent LBP during the follow-up year. Multivariate analyses adjusted for individual factors and an ergonomic factor found statistically significant or almost significant associations of the following psychosocial factors with persistent LBP: interpersonal stress at work [adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.96 and 95% confidence interval (95%CI): 1.00-3.82], job satisfaction (OR: 2.34, 95%CI: 1.21-4.54), depression (OR: 1.92, 95%CI: 1.00-3.69), somatic symptoms (OR: 2.78, 95%CI: 1.44-5.40), support from supervisors (OR: 2.01, 95%CI: 1.05-3.85), previous sick-leave due to LBP (OR: 1.94, 95%CI: 0.98-3.86) and family history of LBP with disability (OR: 1.98, 95%CI: 1.04-3.78). Conclusions: Psychosocial factors are important risk factors for persistent LBP in urban Japanese workers. It may be necessary to take psychosocial factors into account, along with physical work demands, to reduce LBP related disability. © 2014 Matsudaira et al. Source


Matsudaira K.,Clinical Research Center for Occupational Musculoskeletal Disorders | Konishi H.,Nagasaki Rosai Hospital | Miyoshi K.,Spine Center | Isomura T.,Clinical Study Support Inc. | And 4 more authors.
Spine | Year: 2012

Study Design: Two-year, prospective cohort data from the Japan epidemiological research of occupation-related back pain study were used for this analysis. Objective: To examine the association between a new onset of low back pain (LBP) with disability and potential risk factors among initially symptom-free Japanese workers. Summary of Background Data: Despite strong evidence that psychosocial issues may influence LBP onset among symptom-free persons, these and other LBP risk factors have not been well investigated in the Japanese workplace. Methods: Of 5310 participants responding to a self-administered baseline questionnaire (response rate: 86.5%), 3194 (60.2%) completed both 1- and 2-year follow-up questionnaires. The baseline questionnaire assessed individual characteristics, ergonomic work demands, and work-related psychosocial factors. The outcome of interest was new-onset LBP with disability during the follow-up period. Incidence was calculated for the participants who reported no LBP during the past year at baseline. Logistic regression was used to explore risk factors associated with new-onset LBP with disability. Results: Of 836 participants who were symptom-free during the preceding year, 33 (3.9%) reported LBP with disability during the 2-year follow-up. In univariate analyses, "history of LBP," "frequent lifting," "interpersonal stress at workplace," and "monotonous tasks" were all significant predictors of LBP incidence. All of these factors remained statistically significant or almost significant in the multivariate analysis adjusting for the other variables as well as age and sex: adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) for history of LBP (OR: 3.25, 95% CI: 1.53-6.91), frequent lifting (OR: 3.77, 95% CI: 1.16-12.3), interpersonal stress at workplace (OR: 2.42, 95% CI: 1.08-5.43), and monotonous tasks (OR: 2.21, 95% CI: 0.99-4.94). Conclusion: Both ergonomic and work-related psychosocial factors may predict the development of LBP with disability among previously asymptomatic Japanese workers. Thus, workplace interventions aimed at reducing the incidence of LBP should focus on both ergonomic and psychosocial stress. Copyright © 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Source

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