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Pandey J.P.,Medical University of South Carolina | Namboodiri A.M.,Medical University of South Carolina | Kistner-Griffin E.,Medical University of South Carolina | Iwasaki M.,Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening | And 3 more authors.
Clinical and Experimental Immunology | Year: 2013

Tumour-associated antigen human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is over-expressed in 25-30% of breast cancer patients and is associated with poor prognosis. Naturally occurring anti-HER2 antibody responses have been described in patients with HER2 over-expressing tumours. There is significant interindividual variability in antibody responsiveness, but the host genetic factors responsible for this variability are poorly understood. The aim of the present investigation was to determine whether immunoglobulin genetic markers [GM (genetic determinants of γ chains)] and Fcγ receptor (FcγR) alleles contribute to the magnitude of natural antibody responsiveness to HER2 in patients with breast cancer. A total of 855 breast cancer patients from Japan and Brazil were genotyped for several GM and FcγR alleles. They were also characterized for immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies to HER2. In white subjects (n=263), GM 23-carriers had higher levels of anti-HER2 antibodies than non-carriers of this allele (p=0·004). At the GM 5/21 locus, the homozygotes for the GM 5 allele had higher levels of anti-HER2 antibodies than the other two genotypes (P=0·0067). In black subjects (n=42), FcγRIIa-histidine/histidine homozygotes and FcγRIIIa-phenylalanine/valine heterozygotes were associated with high antibody responses (P=0·0071 and 0·0275, respectively). FcγR genotypes in white subjects and GM genotypes in black subjects were not associated with anti-HER2 antibody responses. No significant associations were found in other study groups. These racially restricted contributions of GM and FcγR genotypes to humoral immunity to HER2 have potential implications for immunotherapy of breast cancer. © 2012 British Society for Immunology. Source


Pandey J.P.,Medical University of South Carolina | Kistner-Griffin E.,Medical University of South Carolina | Black L.,Medical University of South Carolina | Namboodiri A.M.,Medical University of South Carolina | And 4 more authors.
Immunobiology | Year: 2014

Immunoglobulin κ constant (IGKC) gene has recently been identified as a strong prognostic marker in several human solid tumors, including breast cancer. Although the mechanisms underlying the IGKC signature are not yet known, identification of tumor-infiltrating plasma cells as the source of IGKC expression strongly suggests a role for humoral immunity in breast cancer progression. The primary aim of the present investigation was to determine whether the genetic variants of IGKC, KM (κ marker) allotypes, are risk factors for breast cancer, and whether they influence the magnitude of humoral immunity to epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), which is overexpressed in 25-30% of breast cancer patients and is associated with poor prognosis. Using a matched case-control design, we genotyped a large (1719 subjects) study population from Japan and Brazil for KM alleles. Both cases and controls in this study population had been previously characterized for GM (γ marker) and Fcγ receptor (FcγR) alleles, and the cases had also been characterized for anti-HER2 antibodies. Conditional logistic regression analysis of the data showed that KM1 allele additively contributed to the risk of breast cancer in the Japanese subjects from Nagano: Compared to KM3 homozygotes, KM1 homozygotes were almost twice as likely to develop breast cancer (OR = 1.77, CI 1.06-2.95). Additionally, KM genotypes-individually and in particular epistatic combinations with FcγRIIa genotypes-contributed to the magnitude of anti-HER2 antibody responsiveness in the Japanese patients. This is the first report implicating KM alleles in the immunobiology of breast cancer. © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. Source


Pandey J.P.,Medical University of South Carolina | Kistner-Griffin E.,Medical University of South Carolina | Namboodiri A.M.,Medical University of South Carolina | Iwasaki M.,Nagano Matsushiro General Hospital | And 3 more authors.
Clinical and Experimental Immunology | Year: 2014

Cyclin B1 is a checkpoint protein that regulates cell division from G2 to the M phase. Studies in mice have shown that cyclin B1 vaccine-induced immunity significantly delayed or prevented the spontaneous cancer development later in life.We hypothesized that if these results showing a protective effect of anti-cyclin B1 antibodies could be extrapolated to the human condition, cancer-free individuals should have higher levels of endogenous antibodies than patients with cancers characterized by the over-expression of this tumour-associated antigen. To test this hypothesis, we characterized a large (1739 subjects) number of multi-ethnic patients with breast cancer (which over-expresses cyclin B1) and matched controls for anti-cyclin B1 immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies. Multivariate analyses, after adjusting for the covariates, showed that cancer-free individuals had significantly higher levels of naturally occurring IgG antibodies to cyclin B1 than patients with breast cancer (mean ± standard deviation: 148.0 ± 73.6 versus 126.1 ± 67.8 arbitrary units per ml; P < 0.0001). These findings may have important implications for cyclin B1-based immunotherapy against breast cancer and many other cyclin B1-over-expressing malignancies. © 2014 British Society for Immunology. Source


Ono H.,National Cancer Center Research Institute | Ono H.,Tokyo Medical and Dental University | Iwasaki M.,Tokyo Medical and Dental University | Kuchiba A.,Dana-Farber Cancer Institute | And 9 more authors.
Cancer Science | Year: 2012

Global hypomethylation of leukocyte DNA has been associated with an increased risk of cancer. As dietary and genetic factors related to one-carbon metabolism may influence both the methylation and synthesis of DNA, we investigated associations between these factors and the global methylation level of peripheral blood leukocyte DNA based on a cross-sectional study of 384 Japanese women. Dietary intake of folate and vitamins B2, B6, and B12 was assessed with a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Five polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) (rs1801133 and rs1801131), methionine synthase (MTR) (rs1805087), and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) (rs10380 and rs162049) were genotyped. Global DNA methylation of leukocyte DNA was quantified using Luminometric Methylation Assay. A linear trend of association between methylation and dietary and genetic factors was evaluated by regression coefficients in a multivariable linear regression model. Mean global methylation level (standard deviation) was 70.2% (3.4) and range was from 59.0% to 81.2%. Global methylation level significantly decreased by 0.36% (95% confidence interval, 0.03-0.69) per quartile category for folate level. Subgroup analysis suggested that alcohol drinking modified the association between folate intake and global methylation level (Pinteraction = 0.01). However, no statistically significant association was observed for intake of vitamins B2, B6, and B12, alcohol consumption, or five single nucleotide polymorphisms of MTHFR, MTR, and MTRR. We found that higher folate intake was significantly associated with a lower level of global methylation of leukocyte DNA in a group of healthy Japanese females. © 2012 Japanese Cancer Association. Source


Iwasaki M.,Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening | Mizusawa J.,Center for Cancer Control and Information Services | Kasuga Y.,Nagano Matsushiro General Hospital | Yokoyama S.,Red Cross | And 4 more authors.
Nutrition and Cancer | Year: 2014

Although many in vitro and animal studies have suggested a protective effect of green tea against breast cancer, only a few epidemiological studies have examined this association, and findings have been inconsistent. We examined the association between green tea consumption and breast cancer risk in consideration of the hormone receptor status of tumors and investigated whether the association was modified by dietary and genetic factors based on a hospital-based case-control study in Nagano, Japan. A total of 369 pairs completed a validated food frequency questionnaire and provided blood samples. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped: CYP19A1 (rs10046), COMT (rs4680), MTHFR C677T (rs1801133), and MTHFR A1298C (rs1801131). We found no inverse association between green tea consumption and breast cancer risk. Compared with women who drank less than 120 ml of green tea per day, the adjusted odds ratio for women who drank more than 600 ml was 1.27 (95% confidence interval = 0.75-2.14; P for trend = 0.20). We also found no inverse association for either tumor subtype. No substantial effect modification was observed for menopausal status, 4 SNPs, or dietary intake of folate or isoflavone. This study provides additional evidence that green tea consumption is not associated with a decreased risk. © 2014 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC. Source

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