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Ono H.,National Cancer Center Research Institute | Ono H.,Tokyo Medical and Dental University | Iwasaki M.,Tokyo Medical and Dental University | Kuchiba A.,Dana-Farber Cancer Institute | And 9 more authors.
Cancer Science | Year: 2012

Global hypomethylation of leukocyte DNA has been associated with an increased risk of cancer. As dietary and genetic factors related to one-carbon metabolism may influence both the methylation and synthesis of DNA, we investigated associations between these factors and the global methylation level of peripheral blood leukocyte DNA based on a cross-sectional study of 384 Japanese women. Dietary intake of folate and vitamins B2, B6, and B12 was assessed with a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Five polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) (rs1801133 and rs1801131), methionine synthase (MTR) (rs1805087), and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) (rs10380 and rs162049) were genotyped. Global DNA methylation of leukocyte DNA was quantified using Luminometric Methylation Assay. A linear trend of association between methylation and dietary and genetic factors was evaluated by regression coefficients in a multivariable linear regression model. Mean global methylation level (standard deviation) was 70.2% (3.4) and range was from 59.0% to 81.2%. Global methylation level significantly decreased by 0.36% (95% confidence interval, 0.03-0.69) per quartile category for folate level. Subgroup analysis suggested that alcohol drinking modified the association between folate intake and global methylation level (Pinteraction = 0.01). However, no statistically significant association was observed for intake of vitamins B2, B6, and B12, alcohol consumption, or five single nucleotide polymorphisms of MTHFR, MTR, and MTRR. We found that higher folate intake was significantly associated with a lower level of global methylation of leukocyte DNA in a group of healthy Japanese females. © 2012 Japanese Cancer Association. Source


Iwasaki M.,Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening | Shimada N.,University of Tokyo | Kasuga Y.,Nagano Matsushiro General Hospital | Yokoyama S.,Red Cross | And 10 more authors.
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment | Year: 2011

Previous studies showing the presence of antibodies against tumor-associated antigens in healthy individuals suggest that antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) might play a role in the development of breast cancer. We hypothesized that functional polymorphisms in fragment c gamma receptor (FcgR) genes were associated with breast cancer risk. We conducted hospital-based case-control studies of patients aged 20-74 years with invasive breast cancer, and matched controls from medical checkup examinees in Nagano, Japan and from cancer-free patients in São Paulo, Brazil. A total of 869 pairs (403 Japanese, 80 Japanese Brazilians and 386 non-Japanese Brazilians) were genotyped for two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): a histidine (H)/arginine (R) polymorphism at position 131 of FcgRIIa (FcgRIIa H131R) and a valine (V)/phenylalanine (F) polymorphism at position 158 of FcgRIIIa (FcgRIIIa F158V). We found no statistically significant association between either of the two SNPs and breast cancer risk regardless of population. In analyses of the three populations combined, adjusted odds ratio (OR) was 0.93 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66-1.32] for women with the R/R versus H/H genotype of the FcgRIIa H131R polymorphism and 1.04 (95% CI 0.69-1.57) for the V/V versus F/F genotype of the FcgRIIIa F158V polymorphism. On combination of the two SNPs, compared to women with both the R/R genotype of the FcgRIIa H131R polymorphism and F/F genotype of the FcgRIIIa F158V polymorphism, the adjusted OR for women with both the H/H and V/V genotype was 0.68 (95% CI 0.37-1.27). In conclusion, our findings suggest that ADCC might not play a major role in the etiology of breast cancer. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. Source


Iwasaki M.,Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening | Mizusawa J.,Center for Cancer Control and Information Services | Kasuga Y.,Nagano Matsushiro General Hospital | Yokoyama S.,Red Cross | And 4 more authors.
Nutrition and Cancer | Year: 2014

Although many in vitro and animal studies have suggested a protective effect of green tea against breast cancer, only a few epidemiological studies have examined this association, and findings have been inconsistent. We examined the association between green tea consumption and breast cancer risk in consideration of the hormone receptor status of tumors and investigated whether the association was modified by dietary and genetic factors based on a hospital-based case-control study in Nagano, Japan. A total of 369 pairs completed a validated food frequency questionnaire and provided blood samples. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped: CYP19A1 (rs10046), COMT (rs4680), MTHFR C677T (rs1801133), and MTHFR A1298C (rs1801131). We found no inverse association between green tea consumption and breast cancer risk. Compared with women who drank less than 120 ml of green tea per day, the adjusted odds ratio for women who drank more than 600 ml was 1.27 (95% confidence interval = 0.75-2.14; P for trend = 0.20). We also found no inverse association for either tumor subtype. No substantial effect modification was observed for menopausal status, 4 SNPs, or dietary intake of folate or isoflavone. This study provides additional evidence that green tea consumption is not associated with a decreased risk. © 2014 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC. Source


Kuchiba A.,National Cancer Center Research Institute | Kuchiba A.,National Cancer Center | Iwasaki M.,Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening | Ono H.,National Cancer Center Research Institute | And 7 more authors.
British Journal of Cancer | Year: 2014

Background:Global hypomethylation has been suggested to cause genomic instability and lead to an increased risk of cancer. We examined the association between the global methylation level of peripheral blood leukocyte DNA and breast cancer among Japanese women.Methods:We conducted a hospital-based case-control study of 384 patients aged 20-74 years with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed invasive breast cancer, and 384 matched controls from medical checkup examinees in Nagano, Japan. Global methylation levels in leukocyte DNA were measured by LUminometric Methylation Assay. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between global hypomethylation and breast cancer were estimated using a logistic regression model.Results:Compared with women in the highest tertile of global methylation level, ORs for the second and lowest tertiles were 1.87 (95% CI=1.20-2.91) and 2.86 (95% CI=1.85-4.44), respectively. Global methylation levels were significantly lower in cases than controls, regardless of the hormone receptor status of the cancer (all P values for trend <0.05).Interpretation:These findings suggest that the global methylation level of peripheral blood leukocyte DNA is low in patients with breast cancer and may be a potential biomarker for breast cancer risk. © 2014 Cancer Research Uk. Source


Iwasaki M.,Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening | Ono H.,National Cancer Center Research Institute | Ono H.,Tokyo Medical and Dental University | Kuchiba A.,National Cancer Center Research Institute | And 8 more authors.
BMC Cancer | Year: 2012

Background: Although global hypomethylation of leukocyte DNA has been associated with an increased risk of several sites of cancer, including breast cancer, determinants of global methylation level among healthy individuals remain largely unexplored. Here, we examined whether postmenopausal endogenous sex hormones were associated with the global methylation level of leukocyte DNA.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using the control group of a breast cancer case-control study in Nagano, Japan. Subjects were postmenopausal women aged 55 years or over who provided blood samples. We measured global methylation level of peripheral blood leukocyte DNA by luminometric methylation assay; estradiol, estrone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, testosterone and free testosterone by radioimmunoassay; bioavailable estradiol by the ammonium sulfate precipitation method; and sex-hormone binding globulin by immunoradiometric assay. A linear trend of association between methylation and hormone levels was evaluated by regression coefficients in a multivariable liner regression model. A total of 185 women were included in the analyses.Results: Mean global methylation level (standard deviation) was 70.3% (3.1) and range was from 60.3% to 79.2%. Global methylation level decreased 0.27% per quartile category for estradiol and 0.39% per quartile category for estrone while it increased 0.41% per quartile category for bioavailable estradiol. However, we found no statistically significant association of any sex hormone level measured in the present study with global methylation level of leukocyte DNA.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that endogenous sex hormones are not major determinants of the global methylation level of leukocyte DNA. © 2012 Iwasaki et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source

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