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Engineering, Myanmar

Wang Y.,California Institute of Technology | Sieh K.,Nanyang Technological University | Aung T.,Myanmar Earthquake Committee | Min S.,Yangon University | And 2 more authors.
Geophysical Journal International | Year: 2011

Field investigations of an ancient fortress wall in southern Myanmar reveal an offset of ∼6 m across the Sagaing fault, the major right-lateral fault between the Sunda and Burma plates. The fault slip rate implied by offset of this 16th-century fortress is between 11 and 18 cm yr-1. A palaeoseismological excavation within the fortress reveals at least two major fault ruptures since its construction. The slip rate we obtained is comparable to geodetic and geological estimates farther north, but is only 50 per cent of the spreading rate (38mmyr-1) at the Andaman Sea spreading centre. This disparity suggests that other structures may be accommodating deformation within the Burma Plate. We propose two fault-slip scenarios to explain the earthquake-rupture history of the southern Sagaing fault. Using both small offset features along the fault trace and historical records, we speculate that the southern Sagaing fault exhibits a uniform-fault-slip behaviour and that one section of the fault could generate aM7+ earthquake within the next few decades. © 2011 The Authors Geophysical Journal International © 2011 RAS. Source


Manaka T.,University of Tokyo | Otani S.,University of Tokyo | Inamura A.,Geological Survey of Japan | Suzuki A.,Geological Survey of Japan | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Geophysical Research G: Biogeosciences | Year: 2015

The role of terrestrial river systems in the global carbon cycle on a long timescale has been a subject of interest, especially in the context of past climate changes such as the global cooling in the Cenozoic. The discharges of water and carbon into the ocean from the Himalayan watersheds are among the highest in the world. However, there are few reliable geochemical data from the Ayeyarwady River. This study focused on reevaluating chemical weathering in the Himalayan watersheds based on samples taken from the Ayeyarwady, Mekong, and Chao Phraya Rivers and on chemical analysis of the composition of dissolved substances in these rivers. Comparisons of water quality showed that, unlike in previous studies, the total alkalinity budgets of the Ayeyarwady are dominated by carbonate rather than silicate weathering. Long-term CO2 consumption by silicate weathering in the Ayeyarwady is estimated to be only 63-145 × 109 mol yr-1, which is only 10% of the previous estimate. Our results also suggest that the total Himalayan watersheds account for only about 10% of the total global CO2 consumption by silicate weathering. Although we need further studies, chemical weathering and associated CO2 uptake in the Himalayas likely played a lesser role in long-term global cooling in the past than previously appreciated. ©2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Source


Manaka T.,Tokyo University of Science | Otani S.,Tokyo University of Science | Inamura A.,Geological Survey of Japan | Suzuki A.,Geological Survey of Japan | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Geophysical Research G: Biogeosciences | Year: 2015

The role of terrestrial river systems in the global carbon cycle on a long timescale has been a subject of interest, especially in the context of past climate changes such as the global cooling in the Cenozoic. The discharges of water and carbon into the ocean from the Himalayan watersheds are among the highest in the world. However, there are few reliable geochemical data from the Ayeyarwady River. This study focused on reevaluating chemical weathering in the Himalayan watersheds based on samples taken from the Ayeyarwady, Mekong, and Chao Phraya Rivers and on chemical analysis of the composition of dissolved substances in these rivers. Comparisons of water quality showed that, unlike in previous studies, the total alkalinity budgets of the Ayeyarwady are dominated by carbonate rather than silicate weathering. Long-term CO2 consumption by silicate weathering in the Ayeyarwady is estimated to be only 63-145×109molyr-1, which is only 10% of the previous estimate. Our results also suggest that the total Himalayan watersheds account for only about 10% of the total global CO2 consumption by silicate weathering. Although we need further studies, chemical weathering and associated CO2 uptake in the Himalayas likely played a lesser role in long-term global cooling in the past than previously appreciated. © 2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Source


Wang Y.,California Institute of Technology | Wang Y.,Nanyang Technological University | Sieh K.,Nanyang Technological University | Tun S.T.,Myanmar Earthquake Committee | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth | Year: 2014

This paper describes geomorphologic evidence for the principal neotectonic features of Myanmar and its immediate surroundings. We combine this evidence with published structural, geodetic, and seismic data to present an overview of the active tectonic architecture of the region and its seismic potential. Three tectonic systems accommodate oblique collision of the Indian plate with Southeast Asia and extrusion of Asian territory around the eastern syntaxis of the Himalayan mountain range. Subduction and collision associated with the Sunda megathrust beneath and within the Indoburman range and Naga Hills accommodate most of the shortening across the transpressional plate boundary. The Sagaing fault system is the predominant locus of dextral motion associated with the northward translation of India. Left-lateral faults of the northern Shan Plateau, northern Laos, Thailand, and southern China facilitate extrusion of rocks around the eastern syntaxis of the Himalaya. All of these systems have produced major earthquakes within recorded history and continue to present major seismic hazards in the region. ©2014. The Authors. Source


Wang Y.,California Institute of Technology | Wang Y.,Nanyang Technological University | Shyu J.B.H.,National Taiwan University | Sieh K.,Nanyang Technological University | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth | Year: 2013

The 1762 Arakan earthquake resulted from rupture of the northern Sunda megathrust and is one of those rare preinstrumental earthquakes for which early historical accounts document ground deformations. In order to obtain more comprehensive and detailed measurements of coseismic uplift, we conducted comprehensive field investigations and geochronological analyses of marine terraces on the two largest islands in western Myanmar. We confirm 3-4 m of coseismic coastal emergence along southwestern Cheduba Island, diminishing northeastward to less than 1 m. Farther northeast, uplift associated with the earthquake ranges from slightly more than 1 m to 5-6 m along the western coast of Ramree Island but is insignificant along the island's eastern coast. This double-hump pattern of uplift coincides with the long-term anticlinal growth of these two islands. Thus, we propose that the 1762 earthquake resulted from slip on splay faults under the islands, in addition to rupture of the megathrust. Elastic modeling implies that fault slip during the 1762 earthquake ranges from about 9 to 16 m beneath the islands and corresponds to a magnitude of M w 8.5 if the rupture length of the megathrust is ~500 km. The island's uplift histories suggest recurrence intervals of such events of about 500-700 years. Additional detailed paleoseismological studies would add significant additional detail to the history of large earthquakes in this region. Key Points We obtained a detailed coastal uplift dataset during the 1762 Arakan earthquake. We propose the 1762 event resulted from slip on splay faults and the megathrust. The recurrence interval of events similar to 1762 ranges between 500 to 700 yrs. ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Source

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