MWH Australia Pty Ltd

Brisbane, Australia

MWH Australia Pty Ltd

Brisbane, Australia
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Trainor C.R.,Charles Darwin University | Trainor C.R.,University of Vic | Knuckey C.,MWH Australia Pty Ltd. | Knuckey C.,Edith Cowan University | And 2 more authors.
Australian Field Ornithology | Year: 2016

The Fortescue Marsh in the Pilbara bioregion, Western Australia, is an extensive ephemeral wetland that fills episodically. It is considered as a potential Ramsar site and is recognised as a nationally important wetland and an Important Bird Area. We surveyed birds at 21 sites on the Fortescue Marsh and a further 23 sites (44 sites in total), including nearby claypans Coondiner Pool and Mungthannannie Pool, in the Fortescue Valley over 12 days in March-April and July 2012. A total of 100 bird species (34 waterbird and 66 landbird species) was recorded during the survey. A further 86 bird species (including 28 waterbird species and 58 landbird species) were recorded for this area from searches of databases and the literature (total of 187 species; 62 waterbirds). New and significant observations during the survey included the first breeding record of Australian Shelduck Tadorna tadornoides for the Pilbara, the first breeding records on the Marsh of Black-tailed Native-hen Tribonyx ventralis and Caspian Tern Hydroprogne caspia, and the first record of Australian Painted Snipe Rostratula australis for the Fortescue Valley. Despite this area's importance to breeding and visiting waterbirds, the birds of the Fortescue Marsh remain surprisingly under-studied. We highlight some significant but overlooked literature records of waterbirds on the Marsh. Further ground and aerial surveys, and ongoing monitoring of this region would be valuable. © 2016, Bird Observers Club of Australia (BOCA). All rights reserved.


Kong W.K.,MWH Australia Pty Ltd
Australian Journal of Civil Engineering | Year: 2012

The most common types of blasting damage are caused by ground vibration. The sudden acceleration of the rock by the detonation energy acting on the drill-hole generates an intense stress wave of both transverse and longitudinal wave motions in the surrounding rock. Key issues associated with the process of excavation and tunnelling include blast and, to a lesser extent, other construction vibration affecting the integrity of surface structures and slopes stability. The stability of slopes subject to ground vibration, which is induced by rock blasting, may be assessed by different approaches. In this paper, pseudo-static and dynamic analysis approaches are discussed. In both approaches, analysis of the dynamics response of slopes to the bedrock vibration in association with the calculation of the allowable vibration limits (ie. critical peak particle velocity (PPV)) and charge weight per delay is presented. A worked example is given to illustrate the use of the method. The allowable charge weights per delay for rock blasting that may impact on the stability of slopes can be estimated using simple approaches, either the pseudo-static or dynamic analysis. Both approaches can give a controllable safety limits for the works. Thus, the blasting works can be carried out safely with no damage or excessive ground movements to the slopes and other sensitive receivers if the allowable PPV and charge weights are followed, and the specified monitoring works are carried out. © 2012 Institution of Engineers Australia.


Kong W.K.,MWH Australia Pty Ltd
Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering | Year: 2011

There are four classical analytical methods being used to estimate water inflow into tunnels. These are Goodman method, Heuer and Raymer method, Heuer Analytical method, and IMS method. Geological data, ground and groundwater information, and permeability data were collected along and in the vicinity of the tunnel alignment in order to prepare a geological longitudinal section together with a rock quality assessment along the tunnel. Rockmass permeability histogram chart, rock mass quality versus permeability chart, were prepared. Water inflow to the tunnel was estimated using the above methods together with the available information of geology, rock quality, rockmass permeability and water table. Potential high water inflow zone was identified of the tunnel to propose additional ground investigation works and probe drill during tunnel construction. Based on the assessment results, early risk planning should be carried out to ensure that the tunnel construction works are proceed in a safe manner, particularly for high water inflow sections of the tunnel.


Trainor C.R.,Charles Darwin University | Trainor C.R.,University of Vic | Trainer J.,Coffey | Knuckey C.,MWH Australia Pty Ltd
Stilt | Year: 2015

The Common Redshank Tringa totanus and Spotted Redshank T. erythropus are vagrants to Australia with most records from coastal Roebuck Bay-Broome area, southern Kimberley. Here we report the first inland Pilbara record of a redshank species, 352 km from the coast, near Newman town on 9 September 2011. The field observation was distant and the redshank could not be identified to species level. © AWSG.

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