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This year premiers the newly-built Plaza Marketplace located in the completely renovated Box Office Plaza that offers pre-entry shopping for picnics on the grounds. Suzanne Goin's "grab-and-go" prepared foods will be available along with fresh breads, cheeses, and snacks, complemented by a collection of Caroline Styne's favorite wines. This location will also be the new pick-up place for pre-ordered picnic boxes. Another pre-entry dining option is a new snack bar located on Peppertree Lane, featuring classic concession food including popcorn, soft pretzels, hot dogs and nachos as well as chips, beer and sodas. Inside the venue, a second stand offering a choice of hand-crafted pizzas has been added alongside a new BBQ kiosk. Hollywood Bowl Food + Wine's many dining options range from two full-service restaurants, food kiosks, custom picnic boxes for pre-order, to Supper in Your Seats. For private events, Hollywood Bowl Food + Wine will also provide catering at several locations for groups both large and small. Supper in Your Seats – Available by pre-order online up to 4 p.m. the day before a performance, Supper in Your Seats offers the choice of curated three-course dinners or customized meals from à la carte selections delivered right to your Box Seat. You can also pre-order complete market-fresh picnic boxes that can be conveniently picked up at the new Plaza Marketplace. Menu Highlight: The brand new Moroccan Feast features a trio of hummus with grilled flat bread, spiced carrot salad, shaved summer squash with preserved lemon, labneh with toasted seeds, parsley and mint, chicken tagine with apricots, saffron cous-cous, almonds and harissa, and olive cake with pistachios and citrus zest for dessert. The Wine Bar by a.o.c – Boasting a wine list curated especially by Caroline Styne, L.A.'s favorite wine bar comes to life at the Hollywood Bowl and features artisanal cheese and charcuterie, signature vintner's and farmer's plates, grilled flatbreads, market-fresh salads, and a.o.c.-styled fish and meats. There are also craft brews and farmers' market- driven cocktails made with soju and other wine-based liquors. the backyard – Al fresco dining featuring an all-new menu at the Hollywood Bowl centers around two large wood-burning grills with a farmers' market-driven menu of summer salads, grilled fresh fish, scallops, lamb merguez, pork chops, steaks, side dishes and an extensive raw bar. Kitchen 22 – Made-to-order beef and turkey burgers, savory sandwiches and grilled delights anchor the Hollywood Bowl's tribute to American classic fare. Menu Highlight: The Cali, featuring free-range, organic turkey, Monterey Jack, avocado and tomato aïoli served on a whole wheat bun. Street Food and Snacks – Authentic street foods can be found throughout the grounds of the Hollywood Bowl, including a diverse selection of the multi-cultural foods of Los Angeles from street tacos and specialty hot dogs and sausages, to confections and signature desserts at the Sweet Shop and Larder Baking Company. Marketplace East & Plaza Marketplace – Features "grab-and-go" salads, hot entrées that include rotisserie chicken, barbecued beef brisket and mac n' cheese, as well as other picnic-friendly sandwiches and cheese plates. Showcasing the best of Goin and Styne's casual Larder café-marketplace, these Hollywood Bowl venues also feature a large selection of hand-picked wines, craft beers, sodas and waters, as well as salty and sweet snacks including cookies and brownies, candy, nuts and crackers. – The west side of the Hollywood Bowl features its own brand of market favorites at Buzz McCoy's Marketplace. A delicious menu of freshly made "grab-and-go" salads, sandwiches, and other, hot and cold, picnic-friendly foods, alongisde the Bowl's very own Sushi Bar where chefs prepare premium sushi, all of which can be preordered, as well as purchased on-site. Lucques at the Circle – This is a full service dining experience for subscribers of the Pool Circle. Showcasing a seasonal made-to-order menu and exceptional wine list styled from the award-winning cuisine of Lucques. Complete menus and images available on request. Please visit www.HollywoodBowl.com/FoodandWine for more information about the food and wine experiences available at the Hollywood Bowl. About the Los Angeles Philharmonic Association The Los Angeles Philharmonic Association, under the vibrant leadership of Music & Artistic Director Gustavo Dudamel, presents an inspiring array of music from all genres - orchestral, chamber and Baroque music, organ and celebrity recitals, new music, jazz, world music and pop - at two of L.A.'s iconic venues, Walt Disney Concert Hall (www.LAPhil.com) and the Hollywood Bowl (http://www.HollywoodBowl.com). The LA Phil's season extends from September through May at Walt Disney Concert Hall, and throughout the summer at the Hollywood Bowl. With the preeminent Los Angeles Philharmonic at the foundation of its offerings, the LA Phil aims to enrich and transform lives through music, with a robust mix of artistic, education and community programs. About the Hollywood Bowl One of the largest natural amphitheaters in the world, with a seating capacity of nearly 18,000, the Hollywood Bowl has been the summer home of the Los Angeles Philharmonic since its official opening in 1922, and plays host to the finest artists from all genres of music. It remains one of the best deals anywhere in Los Angeles; to this day, $1 buys a seat at the top of the Bowl for many classical and jazz offerings. The venue offers something for everyone, from its sizzling summer evening concerts to the daytime arts festival for children, "SummerSounds: World Music for Kids at the Hollywood Bowl." In February 2017, the Hollywood Bowl was named Best Major Outdoor Concert Venue for the thirteenth year in a row at the 28th Annual Pollstar Concert Industry Awards. For millions of music lovers across Southern California, the Hollywood Bowl is synonymous with summer. http://www.HollywoodBowl.com About The Lucques Group With the opening of Lucques, their flagship restaurant, in 1998, James Beard award-winning Chef/Author Suzanne Goin and award-winning Restaurateur Caroline Styne planted the seeds for The Lucques Group, a Los Angeles hospitality company that comprises two other fine dining restaurants - a.o.c. and Tavern - and four marketplace restaurants - The Larder at Maple Drive, The Larder at Burton Way, The Larder at Tavern and The Larder at Tavern at the Tom Bradley International Terminal at LAX. Along with these culinary enterprises, the company also operates Lucques Catering, the Larder Baking Company and, since 2016, comprehensive food services for the Hollywood Bowl. The Lucques Group is dedicated to seasonally influenced cooking and focuses on sourcing local, organic produce from which Goin creates soulful dishes that are bold in flavor, vibrant, layered and complex. About Sodexo Sports & Leisure  Sodexo Sports & Leisure, a division of Sodexo, Inc. is a premier provider to cultural destinations and event venues around the world and in the U.S. including The Jules Verne restaurant at the Eiffel Tower, the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, Space Center Houston, The Smithsonian's National Zoo and the Detroit Institute of Art. Sodexo, Inc. is headquartered in Gaithersburg, MD and funds all administrative costs for the independent and charitable Sodexo Stop Hunger Foundation - granting more than $29 million since 1999 to end childhood hunger in America. Visit the corporate blog at SodexoInsights.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-los-angeles-philharmonic-association-announces-2017-hollywood-bowl-food--wine-concepts-300455044.html


Receive press releases from Military Miniature Society of Illinois: By Email World Model Expo 2017 Chicago Offers Attendees Much to See During the Event The city of Chicago offers visitors to the international triennial World Model Expo a wide variety of options for dining, entertainment, shopping and ease of transportation for their visit to the largest gathering of artists creating and displaying miniature figures, dioramas, vehicles, ships, planes and fantasy subjects. Chicago, IL, May 24, 2017 --( Chicago is one of the most walk-able cities in the U.S. and is easy to reach by taxi and car services along with bus and rail from the city’s two major airports, O’Hare and Midway (which offer many direct flights from all over the world). Union Station is a major rail hub offering another option to reach the show. The Hilton is walking distance to the world-renowned Art Institute of Chicago, Millennium Park, the Magnificent Mile shopping strip, the Pritzker Military Library and Museum, and Grant Park and Buckingham Fountain. Some of the finest restaurants in the world are nearby. Taxi and public transportation provide easy access to the Museum of Science and Industry, Navy Pier, the Field Museum of Natural History, the Shedd Aquarium, the Adler Planetarium, the Wrigley Field, and other world-famous attractions. The World Model Expo Chicago 2017 website (www.we2017chicago.com) offers much information about all the available experiences beyond the exhibit halls such as boat and architectural tours, museum information, shopping and of course dining as Chicago was named by Conde Nast Traveler in May 2017 as “the best restaurant city in America right now,” going on to name the city’s top 19 restaurants. For More Information, contact WME2017 Secretary Jim DeRogatis at jimdero@jimdero.com or Publicity Chairman Mark Matz at mmsipress@gmail.com and visit www.we2017chicago.com Chicago, IL, May 24, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Artists and visitors will be attending the triennial World Model Expo 2017 in Chicago July 7 through 9 at the historic Chicago Hilton at 720 S. Michigan Avenue across from Grant Park. It will be at the center of the painted miniature world inside the hotel and just steps away from world-class dining, entertainment, shopping and more. The hotel has hosted many notables, including Queen Elizabeth II and Presidents Eisenhower and Kennedy along with a host of others from all walks of life.Chicago is one of the most walk-able cities in the U.S. and is easy to reach by taxi and car services along with bus and rail from the city’s two major airports, O’Hare and Midway (which offer many direct flights from all over the world). Union Station is a major rail hub offering another option to reach the show. The Hilton is walking distance to the world-renowned Art Institute of Chicago, Millennium Park, the Magnificent Mile shopping strip, the Pritzker Military Library and Museum, and Grant Park and Buckingham Fountain. Some of the finest restaurants in the world are nearby. Taxi and public transportation provide easy access to the Museum of Science and Industry, Navy Pier, the Field Museum of Natural History, the Shedd Aquarium, the Adler Planetarium, the Wrigley Field, and other world-famous attractions.The World Model Expo Chicago 2017 website (www.we2017chicago.com) offers much information about all the available experiences beyond the exhibit halls such as boat and architectural tours, museum information, shopping and of course dining as Chicago was named by Conde Nast Traveler in May 2017 as “the best restaurant city in America right now,” going on to name the city’s top 19 restaurants.For More Information, contact WME2017 Secretary Jim DeRogatis at jimdero@jimdero.com or Publicity Chairman Mark Matz at mmsipress@gmail.com and visit www.we2017chicago.com Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Military Miniature Society of Illinois


Absolute wins third award for redevelopment and redesign of Tampa's Museum of Science and Industry website, recognizing its excellence in web design.


News Article | April 30, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Robots aren't plotting an imminent human take-over; robots are our partners and friends. That's the broad theme of a Google.org-backed robotics exhibit coming soon to Chicago. Robot Revolution features cutting-edge bots that can climb up and down ladders, solve a Rubik's cube at lightning speed, compete in a soccer match, mimic your facial expressions, make "eye" contact, and, in the case of the furry seal robot PARO, respond to human touch. SEE ALSO: Toyota's new robotic leg brace will help stroke patients walk again The exhibit first premiered at Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry in 2015, then traveled to Denver and Philadelphia. Now it's back with even more robots and support from Google's philanthropic arm and Boeing, the aircraft and rocket manufacturing giant. The Chicago show runs from May 11 and to Feb. 4, 2018.


News Article | February 19, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

For nearly a century, diesel-electric submarines relied on constantly charging traditional lead-acid batteries by running their diesel engines either on the surface or later on, while snorkeling near the surface. This left them constantly vulnerable, as they could only hide deep beneath the surface for hours or a couple days at a time. Over the last few decades, Air Independent Propulsion (AIP) technology has revolutionized the traditional diesel-electric submarine  Performance capabilities approaching the the domain of highly expensive and large nuclear submarines have became available for a fraction of the cost in the form of smaller, AIP equipped diesel-electric submarines. Now the diesel-electric submarine is on the verge of yet another revolution, one that will return to type to its original roots, relying on diesel engines and batteries alone to go about its clandestine business. AIP technology describes an idea more than one strict submarine configuration. The same general concept can be achieved via multiple methods. The most modern versions range from using Stirling Engines, to the French MESMA (translated as autonomous submarine energy module) closed-cycle steam turbine system, to cutting-edge fuel cells to power the submarine while it is submerged for long periods of time. Each approach has its own advantages and disadvantages, with cost, complexity and technological risk being major factors beyond raw performance. For instance, Sweden’s deadly but comparatively simple and proven Gotland class uses Stirling Engines for AIP, and although the technology is well proven and affordable, it also requires the boat to lug around liquid oxygen oxidizer, which can have its own dangers, as well as inert gas to mix with it. The Stirling engines and other infrastructure needed to make the system work, much of a relatively small submarine’s bulk gets taken up by the system. Additionally, Stirling Engine based AIP has many moving parts, which can make noise even when a high-degree of soundproofing is designed into the submarine. Sweden leased a Gotland class submarine to the Navy in the mid 2000s to work as an aggressor boat. It proved to be a very dangerous enemy, with its AIP technology causing major concerns among US Navy tacticians. The impact of these prolonged war games are still being felt today (US Navy photo): The French MESMA form of AIP, as used in Pakistan’s Agosta 90B class, is far more complex than the Stirling Engine AIP concept. It basically acts in a similar fashion as a nuclear reactor, although it uses ethanol and liquid oxygen combustion to generate steam, not a nuclear reaction, to spin a turbine and generate electricity. Once again, the boat has to lug around ethanol and volatile liquid oxygen as well as complex machinery—which produces noise—to make the system work, but it can produce a lot of power, which is good for high-speed operations. Cost is a major factor as MESMA is not a cheap technology to acquire or maintain. Finally, fuel cell-based AIP, although very high-tech and not capable of quickly ramping-up its power output like say a MESMA configuration can, is very quiet as there are few moving parts in the system. It also is a very efficient system for long endurance missions. So if you don’t have to sprint very fast but have to stay silent and stealthy for long periods of time, the technology has huge benefits. It is thought that Australia’s upcoming Shortfin Barracuda submarines, of French origin, will use fuel cell AIP propulsion. These massive submarines will offer as close to nuclear propulsion capabilities as possible. Israel's latest Dolphin class boats also use fuel cell AIP, which makes sense as they work as Israel's second-strike nuclear deterrent. All sensors and weapons being equal, a Navy has to justify what type of diesel electric submarine to choose based not just on cost but also on what type of tactics they aim to employ and what type of combat environment they are most likely to fight in. For instance, if long-range patrols and ambush tactics are common, along with the need for maximum stealth, fuel cell AIP technology may be best. If bursts of high-speed during attack and evasion maneuvers are needed often, along with high endurance, MESMA may be most appropriate. For shorter-range littoral combat operations, the Stirling Engine-based AIP technology may make the most sense. The thing is that with the large leaps in battery technology realized over the last couple of decades, AIP technology may soon face serious competition in the world of submarine warfare. The first electric submarine was the Peral Submarine built for the Spanish in 1888:  High-tech diesel-electric submarines may begin to return to their simpler roots as Japan is pioneering a concept today that aims to eliminate AIP altogether. Their next generation Soryu class diesel-electric attack submarines will be equipped with lithium-ion batteries, and just like submarines dating back before World War I, they will run undersea on battery power alone.  The Soryu class is already a very modern submarine, having been introduced into service just over a decade ago. As an outgrowth of the previous Oyashio class, these are not tiny boats, displacing 4,200 tons submerged and measuring 275 feet long, They are the largest submarines Japan has constructed since the end of World War II. They also feature an “X” tailplane configuration for extreme maneuverability in tight littoral environments.  The profile of the Soryu class (Mike1979Russia/wikicommons): Today seven boats are operational, all of which leverage Stirling Engine AIP technology licensed directly from Kockums—the same Swedish company that produces the Gotland class. Japan, an island nation with long and complex coastlines, uses its submarines to patrol its territorial holdings and to protect its shores. As such, the proven and affordable Stirling Engine-based AIP technology, paired with the class’s large size and ample fuel reservoirs, was a good, balanced fit for their needs. But now Japan wants to eliminate AIP technology altogether without losing its benefits, and in doing so free up room for other capabilities while also simplifying design, construction and sustainment of their future submarines. Above all else, this new configuration should result in quieter operation than most existing AIP capable submarines. The idea is to install thousands of lithium-ion batteries along with powerful diesel engines and generators, as well as large exhaust and intakes stacks to accommodate them, into a tweaked Soryu design. A new power handling system that can deal with high power loads and optimize efficiency is also included in the concept. Basically, the configuration is similar to a standard diesel-electric submarine, that uses diesel engines and batteries alone for propulsion, but infused with new technology.  Lithium-ion batteries have a ton of advantages over their old-school lead-acid cousins. They keep up their output even when their charge runs low, they are lighter than lead-acid batteries, they can be charged exceptionally fast (hence the more powerful diesel engine and generators), and they can store much more energy. Compared to the AIP system they aim to replace, endurance should be similar, while the overall boat’s propulsion system design will be less complex and bulky. Not just that, but lithium-ion batteries can provide large output on demand, allowing the boat to dash mush faster while dived compared to one running on an AIP system. The main downside to lithium-ion batteries is very well publicized: they are known to “runaway” and combust—exactly what you don’t want on a submarine. When they do so they produce very high heat, give off toxic fumes and expel conductive dust. They are also hard to extinguish using traditional means. But because weight is not as much of an issue on a large sea-going vessel, new methods of abatement can be put in place to lower the risk of a fire and its potentially catastrophic results.  Suppliers are working with Japan’s Maritime Self-Defense Force to overcome these concerns by building larger lithium-ion cell matrices with reinforced boundaries and enhanced chemistry that is less susceptible to these types of events. Extensive short-circuit, saltwater intrusion, drop and impact testing has also been done to certify the batteries for such critical use. Also, a specialized fire extinguishing system will be installed aboard advanced Soryu boats to neutralize a fire quickly and automatically in its battery compartments should one occur.  Lithium-ion batteries have had their problems in aircraft and in submersibles before, but Japan is investing billions into making the technology work, with the last three Soryu class boats being earmarked for lithium-ion propulsion. The seventh boat in the class, which is in the water now, may also use lithium-ion batteries, although it may be in combination with the four Stirling Engines found on earlier models. This boat could act as a “bridge” between the new all lithium-ion battery configuration and the older AIP configuration and could also serve as technology demonstrator for fielding the new batteries on a smaller scale aboard a submarine. The Soryu class is almost entirely covered in acoustic tiling (Norio NAKAYAMA/wikicommons): With this new Soryu class configuration, Japan has the potential to raise their profile as builders of an excellent class of attack submarine to the realm of world leader in new conventionally-powered submarine technology. This could mean serious exports if the type proves to be reliable and safe.  Down the road, the success of Japan’s lithium-ion battery powered subs could also mean a large cut in price for their AIP-like capabilities. Not just that, but other configurations, where existing AIP technologies are paired with lithium-ion batteries could also emerge, offering the best of both worlds for some users. The pairing of lithium-ion batteries and fuel cells for instance could result in highly capable and versatile submarines that feature extreme endurance, very quiet operation, fast acceleration and high dash speeds. In fact, there are rumors that China is working on pairing lithium-ion batteries with its own AIP submarines right now. But such a hybrid design would come at greater cost and complexity than what Japan or most navies require.  A diagram of the so called "Super Soryu" class of submarines that was intended to fulfill Australia's requirement for a new advanced attack submarine. It would have used lithium-ion batteries instead of AIP and many thought it was a favorite to win the tender. In the end DCNS won with their Shortfin Baraccuda concept that supposedly leverages fuel cell AIP technology. Considering the extreme range requirements that Australia puts on their submarines, it really is no surprise that even the enlarged "Super Soryu," which was designed for more territorial operations, was passed over: The US Navy, which got out of the diesel-electric submarine business 27 years ago, has since experienced a submarine deficit, one that has no sign of abating. If Japan is successful in proving that higher-tech, yet simpler and possibly cheaper lithium-ion powered diesel-electric submarines can achieve similar or better performance as AIP equipped boats, all with less of equal acoustic signature as the best nuclear submarines, the US should move to adopt the technology. The USS Blueback was the last diesel-electric submarine in the US Navy's fleet. For years it worked as aggressor boat, but by 1990 the Navy had moved on to an all nuclear submarine force. Blueback was featured in Hunt for the Red October and now resides at Oregon Museum of Science and Industry: As we have discussed before, there is every reason for the US Navy to invest in diesel-electric submarines now that they have evolved so much over the last three decades. For so many missions, a nuclear submarine is not needed, and their massive infrastructure needs and security concerns makes forward basing them in foreign countries impossible. But now that AIP may not even be needed, the Navy could solve its attack submarine capacity woes by adopting Japan’s technology and building their own version of the advanced Soryu class under license. This would provide the highest-tech solution at the lowest possible cost. Roughly four Soryu class boats could be bought for the price of a single Virginia class SSN today. If a Soryu derivative were put into wider serial production, their price would drop event further. Sadly, the politics and special interests behind naval shipbuilding in the US, and especially submarine building, along with the Navy’s blind unwillingness to deviate from its nuclear only submarine strategy, makes such a logical proposition all but impossible to realize. Regardless of the US Navy’s elitist obsession with keeping an all nuclear submarine force, it will be interesting to watch Japan as they move forward with fielding their first lithium-ion powered diesel-electric attack submarine. And don’t expect them to be shy about possessing such a capability. Once they have found the technology to be stable they will likely show it off in an attempt to offset their investment with export sales.  This article was originally published on TheDrive.com


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

Soaring mercury, sinking cities, mass extinctions. It is easy to catastrophise climate change: faced with the sheer enormity of the climate challenge, people can tend towards despair and nihilism. For others, its seeming distance (both chronologically and, for many of us in the global north in particular, geographically) can seduce us with the easy denial that it is someone else’s problem to fix. The technology and resources to move towards a post-carbon society are essentially all there. What we lack is a broad, civic movement to get behind the urgency – and significant opportunities – of this transition. So rather than looking darkly into a dystopian future in which we are passive victims, it is vital to make climate change relevant in the here and now – the air we breathe, the food we eat, the way we travel. Human-scale things we have agency to change. We need to find new ways to narrate and envision a fairer, cleaner future in which we can actively participate. This year’s annual Lovelock Commission Cloud Crash by artist duo HeHe, a collaboration of Cape Farewell, the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Museum of Science and Industry (MSI) in Manchester, is an example of how art can enable major public engagement in what former chief scientific advisor Sir David King posits as ‘the biggest challenge of all time’. The Lovelock Commission takes inspiration from pioneering climate scientist James Lovelock’s Gaia Theory, which posits the earth as a single self-regulating organism – and this year the commission focuses on atmospherics - namely, man-made emissions. The headline event for this year’s Manchester Science Festival, Cloud Crash seeks to make pollution – and its component part, climate change – visible, and asks some uncomfortable questions of society. The role of the scientist and that of the artist is to make the invisible visible. Gone are the pea soupers that choked London 60 years ago. Today’s pollution is largely invisible to the naked eye – and all the more insidious for it. A recent study by King’s College London revealed that 9,500 Londoners die each year due to long-term exposure to air pollution, and that levels of pollution in major cities including London, Leeds and Birmingham will exceed legal limits until at least 2030. WHO estimate exposure to the particulate matter - small particulate matter of 10 microns or less in diameter (PM10)- caused 3 million premature deaths worldwide per year in 2012 through cardiovascular and respiratory disease, and cancers. This invisible menace needs to be brought into the light so that we can understand what we are fighting. With Cloud Crash HeHe took as point of departure the air quality forecast maps produced by the (NERC funded) National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) – that show, in hauntingly beautiful detail, levels of ozone, particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide as it sweeps across the UK. What they have produced are three new pieces placed in-situ across the MSI site. In Airbag an ordinary car has crashed against a steel post in the courtyard. In a playful reversal of the polluting emissions of everyday cars (one of the largest contributors to lethal nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter emissions), this car has become a suspended cloud chamber, insulating a floating microclimate from the outside world. It is an object of reflection and provocation – as HeHe explain ‘there is a certain irony in admiring the beauty of such a fragile atmosphere, held inside an object which is so violently transforming our own unprotected airspace.’ Diamonds in the Sky is an immersive audio-visual experience based in the Air and Space Hall, that imagines a swarming cloud of pollution particles slamming into the side of Beetham Tower – Manchester’s landmark skyscraper which has come to symbolise the post-industrial reinvention of the city. Expanding on pollution forecast maps, this video piece highlights invisible ozone, nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter using vivid saturation colour – each particle per million represented by a pixel. Finally, Burnout asks difficult questions of the arts industry and its role in climate change. A scale-model of the Tate Modern belches out vapour clouds – as if it is simultaneously an art museum and an active energy producer. The building’s original incarnation was Bankside, London’s major fossil-fuel power station from 1952 to 1981, whereas today Tate Modern is often referred to as an ‘art powerhouse’. By so doing, Burnout confronts both the building’s past and the arts sector’s modern day collusion with the fossil industry. Despite a recent decision from Tate to drop BP sponsorship after 26 years, the sector is still overshadowed by certain partnerships. For instance, what many pressure groups such as BP or Not BP call the ‘controversial and ironic’ sponsorship of ‘Sunken Cities’ exhibition by BP (a show rebranded as ‘Sinking Cities – Flooding our World’ by Greenpeace in a publicity stunt back in May) Above and beyond, Cloud Crash explores a key issue – that to consume and create culture of all kinds is also to consume energy, however it may be sanitized. Brilliant organisations such as Julie’s Bicycles are doing vital work in helping the arts sector reduce their own environmental impacts. Without this, even the most successful public engagement activity and artworks relating to climate change could prove something of a Phyrric victory. Artists and scientists are natural collaborators, both are explorers and storytellers, seeking out new ways of understanding, communicating (and indeed, changing) the world around them. So when it comes to the dry (or simply terrifying) language of climate science, the marriage of the two can be particularly fruitful. Artists can respond to environmental data in work that provokes real engagement. By communicating these issues in lateral, innovative ways, by using humour and humanity, these sorts of works can reach us on a more animal, cellular, level – and therefore, hopefully, demand our response. It is important to remember that the dialogue between artists with scientists is two-way. The innate creativity of artists can also inform the work of scientists. NERC’s recent call for public engagement pilot activity celebrates this dialogue, as they seek to support new work that engages members of the UK public with relevant contemporary issues of environmental science whilst also building engagement capacity in the environmental science research community - in particular providing opportunities for early career researchers and PhD students to develop skills in they way they approach, and present, their own research. The arts can come to the service of sciences as much as the other way round. When it comes to climate science it is all about finding the right language and tone for it - reframing it as an opportunity not sacrifice, making tangible the intangible and giving agency where once there was apathy. Above all, we need to make climate change relatable to us all – and in this there is a great deal more work to do. It is vital that climate-focused arts reach as wide and varied an audience as possible. Diversity is critically important in the climate battle, enabling the society-wide engagement it demands. Lucy Wood is an arts producer with a focus on climate change, food systems and migration. She is Director of international environmental arts charity Cape Farewell. She is on twitter as @lucywoodie. Cloud Crash runs across the MSI site from 20 October 2016 – 4 February 2017. Post amended at 6.23pm on 31st October to correct two minor typographical errors.


News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: www.npr.org

Still Have Leftover Halloween Candy? Use It For Science! Halloween has come and gone, but piles of candy remain. You have two options: Eat it all and risk a serious sugar coma, or get seriously creative with some candy-themed science. We asked employees at various science museums what experiments they like to do with leftover candy. Get crackin'. "Your sense of taste is actually really limited," explains Julie Yu, senior scientist and director of the Teacher Institute at the Exploratorium in San Francisco. A lot of what we perceive as flavor comes from smell, because our tongue can only taste a few things: sweet, salty, sour, bitter and savory (and fat). You can test this by plugging your nose, putting candy in your mouth, and unplugging your nose. Then, see if the flavor changes. You can test foods for starch using ingredients from a drug store, according to Debra Bailey, co-coordinator of the Micro World Investigate Lab at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. Just crush up a candy and mix it into water. Then, add a few drops of the solution into a cup of iodine (yes, the antiseptic). If it changes from amber to black, you've got starch! Bailey says you can also test for Vitamin C, glucose, and proteins with paper indicator strips for sale on Amazon. Ever wonder how many different dyes are used to color Skittles? Well, OK, me neither. But now I really want to know, and Kelly Thornton, youth and family programs manager at the Pacific Science Center, says it's not too hard to find out. You need candy, a coffee filter, a pencil, aluminum foil, salt, water, toothpicks and cups. The salty water will pull the dye up the paper with capillary action. Different dye molecules will move different distances, so the colors will separate. If multiple dyes color one Skittle (or M&M, or Canadian Smartie), you'll know! Rebecca Reilly likes to mutilate her candy: "Cut it up, melt it, dissolve it, test the acidity ... things like that." She's the food science coordinator at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, and her favorite candy experiments are open-ended ones. "One great thing about candy is it's full of things you wouldn't expect, which makes it great for science experiments! It reacts in really strange ways," she says. Reilly shared some of her favorite things to do with candy, and a bit about what those things can teach you: Have you ever noticed that chocolate sprinkles look like mouse poop? Well, the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences has. Megan Chesser, a teacher education specialist, likes to hide animal scat (yes, poop) in schoolyards. She leads teachers on a scavenger hunt, and dares them to make observations about the scat. They break it open to see what's inside and smell it. "Finally, I say, 'You know what's a great way to tell what this is made of? Eating it.' And then I pop it into my mouth," says Chesser. The secret is, it's chocolate, mashed up to look like it came from a raccoon. Chesser takes the teachers back to a classroom to make edible scat of their own. They mold tootsie rolls into different shapes for different animals. To make omnivore poop, like a bear has, she mixes in nuts and berries. For bird and reptile scat, Chesser suggests rolling tootsie rolls in powdered sugar to get that authentic patina. For carnivores, add some shredded wheat for hair. Chesser says it's a great way to get kids thinking about food webs. Some candies don't need much work. Hershey's Kisses look like elk scat, and if you chop up chocolate sprinkles it looks like cockroach poop (or "frass," which Chesser delightedly informed me is the technical name for arthropod poop.) For larger animals, "leftover brownies from a Halloween party are great to mold into tubular scat," says Chesser. "A box of brownie mix goes a long way."


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

PORTLAND, Ore., Feb. 21, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- The Oregon Tourism Commission, dba Travel Oregon, in partnership with the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI), is helping residents and visitors prepare for this summer's total solar eclipse – the first in the continental U.S. since 19...


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: AISL | Award Amount: 531.12K | Year: 2015

Approximately 8.4 million children in the United States participate annually in out-of-school time (OST) programs with a science component. These programs have been shown to have a wide range of impacts on scientific literacy, school achievement, and career interest. Because such programs take place outside of home and school, they offer participants learning flexibility and a sense of agency that otherwise do not exist in traditional science learning contexts. However, current research on OST is largely limited to evaluation-level data that has not been synthesized, making it difficult to draw definite conclusions. As seen in other fields, a larger evidence base is needed for the OST field to grow or else non-evidence-based policies will be imposed upon the field by outside forces. The project team will conduct an experimental, longitudinal research project to address these issues. This Research-in-Service to Practice project is funded by the Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL) program which seeks to advance new approaches to, and evidence-based understanding of, the design and development of STEM learning in informal environments.

The study uses a sophisticated design with a wide variety of measures to follow three cohorts of adolescent youth (~200) over a 4-year period to address the primary research question: How does participation of adolescent youth from traditionally underrepresented groups in a well-established, out-of-school time science program affect their career choices and attitudes towards science as they mature into early adulthood? While each measure is rooted in established literature and methodology, putting it all together using a comprehensive, complementary approach has not yet been done in the OST field. The research studies will be looking at a number of variables in order to measure program impact including: demographic and experiential background of program participants, STEM attitudes, career interest/choices, scientific engagement, and participation. Data will be collected via survey, observation, interviews, and document review. The program practitioners will contribute diary and field note data to the study.

This project will provide STEM education practitioners with the evidence-based information they need to develop better programs for underrepresented minority (URM) youth so program and policy decisions are not made in a vacuum. Operationally, findings will have an impact on OST and URM science education researchers by generating new research methodology and techniques. Tactically, it will benefit greater URM communities by investigating how OST programs can support science learning and scientific interest among their adolescent youth. Strategically, the study impacts the nation by providing evidence about the validity of OST programs as a critical partner to address the issue of URM involvement in the STEM workforce. Also, the corpus of raw data will be made public, providing a large and varied data set for others to explore. This research is being conducted by the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, and the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

PORTLAND, Ore.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The James Beard Public Market, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and public-private partnership developing a permanent year-round public market, has accepted an invitation from the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) to participate in the Master Planning for OMSI’s expanded campus, which is located within Portland’s emerging Innovation Quadrant. OMSI recently launched a process to create a master development plan for the museum’s 18-acre waterfront pro

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