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NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--ICFF®, North America’s largest and most prestigious series of design events for interiors, has much to celebrate heading into its 29th year, including a record number of ICFF Studio submissions for ICFF NYC 2017. The annual collaboration with Bernhardt Design is a platform for undiscovered design professionals to engage with the global design community, showcase new prototypes, and in many cases kick-start design careers. Studio prototypes will be on display at ICFF NYC, taking place May 21-24, 2017 at the Jacob K. Javits Center in New York City. “As a young designer, ICFF Studio was a great experience. It gave us our first chance to meet the industry,” said Enrico Fratesi, architect and co-founder of GamFratesi Studio, and an ICFF Studio 2006 finalist. “We met people at our first ICFF that we are still connected with today. It was with a combination of opportunities to meet the right people, of which ICFF Studio was a central piece, that we started our studio and our careers.” “We are honored to have such an incredible response to this year’s ICFF Studio call for submissions,” said Kevin O’Keefe, ICFF event director. “ICFF Studio has been a key feature of our show for 12 years, and each year I look forward to seeing what our young designers will showcase to the global design community.” Registration for ICFF NYC 2017 is now open. Members of the design community can visit the ICFF registration page to register. New for 2017, the ICFF Gallery will host a curated space of paintings, sculptures and distinctive art and collectibles on the show floor. ICFF Gallery exhibitors will present designs ideal for inclusion in luxury residential, boutique and hospitality environments. ICFF is also proud to welcome over 800 exhibitors from around the globe to New York City this May. Exhibitors include residential design leaders making up 10 international contingents, including Interiors of Spain, Sindomoveis of Brazil, Luxe France, The Italian Trade Agency, Romania, Austria, Norway, GEM French Export Group, Design Philippines, and the British European Design Group. This year, ICFF NYC will take place on one level of an expanded show floor. The show will once again connect members of the interior design trade to industry influencers, leading brands, top design focused media and emerging talent through a series of educational programs, including CEU accredited sessions, and the ICFF Talks program. Members of the media can visit http://registration.experientevent.com/showicf171/?flowcode=media to register for a press badge. ICFF NYC is once again the cornerstone event of NYCxDESIGN. Hosted in New York City, NYCxDESIGN brings together all disciplines of design, commerce, culture, education and entertainment with a full, varied program including exhibitions, installations, trade shows, talks, launches and open studios. NYCxDESIGN 2017 will take place May 3-24, 2017. Interior Design and ICFF will co-present the annual NYCxDESIGN Awards at the Museum of Modern Art on Saturday, May 20. The awards ceremony will once again be followed by the highly anticipated ICFF MoMA opening night reception. ICFF® is the premier North American global Design showcase for interior furniture, seating, carpet and flooring, lighting, outdoor furniture, materials, wall coverings, accessories, textiles, kitchen and bath and fabricators, attracting more than 800 exhibitors and 35,000 attendees from around the world. The 29th annual ICFF® in New York is scheduled for May 21-24, 2017 at New York City’s Jacob K. Javits Convention Center. The second annual ICFF® Miami is scheduled for October 3-4, 2017. Visit www.icff.com for more information on ICFF NYC and www.icffmiami.com for details on ICFF Miami. Follow us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ICFFdesign, on Twitter at @ICFF and on Instagram at icff_nyc. ICFF is owned and operated by Emerald Expositions, a leading operator of large business-to-business trade shows in the United States, producing more than 80 trade shows and over 100 face-to-face events in total, including conferences, summits and other events. Emerald Expositions connects more than 335,000 sellers and buyers each year and operates within the U.S. in 10 end markets (Gift, Home, General Merchandise and Manufacturing; Sports & Apparel; Design; Jewelry, Luxury & Antiques; E-Commerce; Creative Services; Licensing; Healthcare; Military; and Food).


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Yares Art is pleased to present "Manuel Neri: Singularity of Form & Surface," the first solo exhibition at the gallery's New York location, featuring bronze sculptures and drawings from the noted California artist. The exhibition runs from February 23rd through April 8th, 2017, with a preview reception on Thursday, February 23rd from 5:30 to 7:30pm at Yares Art’s new location on the 4th floor at 745 Fifth Avenue, New York. An 88-page catalogue published for the exhibition is available at the gallery. Gallery owner Dennis Yares writes in the exhibition catalogue that Manuel Neri’s work “continues a Modernist figurative tradition advanced in the 20th century by such artists as Alberto Giacometti and Marino Marini, yet Neri’s approach to the figure is matchless and very much his own. For Neri, the sculptural figure remains a viable and relevant vehicle capable of speaking in contemporary terms...” Neri, whose career now spans six decades, has exhibited with Yares galleries in Scottsdale, Arizona, and Santa Fe, New Mexico, since 1991. This is his first solo New York exhibition in ten years. Manuel Neri (b. 1930) is recognized for his life-size figurative sculptures and reliefs in plaster, bronze, and marble, their complex surfaces sanded, gouged, or painted as a means of directing the gestural thrust. The life-size bronze figures and maquettes featured in this exhibition are treated with the artist’s signature “Alborada patina,” a white painted surface layered with yellow glazes, that highlights the glow of the bronze and the sculptures’ formal and gestural essence. In Neri's work with the figure, he conveys an emotional inner state that is revealed through body language, gesture, and surface. During the past four decades, Neri has worked primarily with the same model, Mary Julia Klimenko, creating drawings and sculptures that merge contemporary sculptural concerns with classical forms. Since 1965 Neri has worked in his studio in Benicia, California; in 1981 he purchased a studio in Carrara, Italy, for working in marble. Neri initially became known in the 1960s for his association with the Bay Area Figurative movement. During the 1950s, he was a member of the artist-run cooperative Six Gallery in San Francisco where, in October 1955, he helped organize the "6 Poets at 6 Gallery" poetry reading, a landmark Beat era event where Allen Ginsberg gave the first public reading of “Howl.” In 1959, Neri was an original member of the Rat Bastard Protective Association, along with Bruce Conner, Joan Brown, Jay DeFeo, and other artists. (In the early 1960s Neri was married to painter Joan Brown, though their relationship and artistic collaboration dated back several years prior to that.) Neri taught sculpture at California School of Fine Arts (1959–65) and UC Berkeley Art Department (1963-4), and was on the art department faculty at the University of California, Davis from 1965-99. Awards include the International Sculpture Center’s 2006 Lifetime Achievement Award in Contemporary Sculpture, the 2008 Bay Area Treasure Award from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and many others. Museums holding works by Manuel Neri include the Art Institute of Chicago; Denver Art Museum; El Paso Museum of Art; Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; Honolulu Museum of Art; Indianapolis Museum of Art; Memphis Brooks Museum; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Manetti Shrem Museum, Davis, California; Minneapolis Institute of Art; Nasher Gallery at Duke University; Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas; National Gallery of Art, Washington DC; Oakland Museum of California; Palm Springs Art Museum; Portland Art Museum, Oregon; San Diego Museum of Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; San Jose Museum of Art; Seattle Art Museum; University Museums, Iowa State University, Ames; Whitney Museum of American Art; Yale University Art Gallery, and others. Yares Art champions primarily major Postwar Abstract Expressionist and Color Field artists and has represented the Milton Avery Estate for the past five decades. The gallery’s inaugural exhibition featured “Helen Frankenthaler and L.M.N.O.P,” with works by Frankenthaler, Morris Louis, Robert Motherwell, Kenneth Noland, Jules Olitski, and Larry Poons and was hailed by writer David Ebony as “A rarity in New York, … a concise overview of the Color Field movement of the late 1950s and ’60s, whose heroic scaled canvases and immersive, panoramic viewing experiences are little known by younger generations of artists and art-lovers.” (Nov. 26, 2016, artnet.com) Yares Art is located at 745 Fifth Avenue, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10151 (212) 256-0969. http://www.yaresart.com


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: phys.org

The state has threatened legal action if the ride-hailing company continues to pick up passengers in a handful of cars without having gone through a permitting process. Uber says the cars are exempt from the permit requirement because they have a backup driver behind the wheel who must monitor the car's performance. State officials had a "positive conversation" Thursday with Uber about "how the company plans to comply with state regulations for self-driving vehicles," Melissa Figueroa, a spokeswoman for California's State Transportation Agency, told The Associated Press. Talks will resume Friday morning, she said. Uber did not immediately reply to requests for comment. Meanwhile, the cars could be seen traveling San Francisco's streets Thursday evening. The two sides met privately in Sacramento the same day that dash cam video posted online showed a self-driving Uber run a red light on Wednesday, the same day the company launched the pilot program with several Volvo SUVs. On Thursday, Uber said in a written statement that the driver was suspended and attributed the infraction in front of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art to "human error." That was an apparent reference to the company's policy that employees behind the wheel of the cars must constantly monitor them and be prepared to take over if the technology stops working, or is about to do something dangerous or illegal. Far from playing defense, Uber offered the driver's failure as evidence of the need to continue pushing ahead a technology that proponents say will one day drive far more safely than humans. "This is why we believe so much in making the roads safer by building self-driving Ubers," the company said in a written statement, which said the red light-running car was not one of those in its pilot program and was not carrying passengers. Getting a permit is not a complicated or lengthy process, and regulators would likely approve Uber's application, as they have permits for 20 other companies. Instead, Uber has insisted it will not apply out of principle, saying its cars do not meet the state's legal definition of an "autonomous vehicle" and therefore do not need a permit. Though the cars are tricked out with sensors so they can steer, accelerate and brake, and even decide to change lanes, Uber says they are not nearly good enough to drive without human monitoring. And, according to Uber's reading of state law, that means they are not, legally speaking, "autonomous vehicles" that need special state permission. Pushing legal boundaries is a proud tradition at Uber. During its meteoric rise into a multibillion dollar company, Uber has argued with authorities in California and around the world about issues including driver criminal background checks and whether those drivers should be treated as contractors ineligible for employee benefits. Both the California Department of Motor Vehicles and its parent transportation agency insist Uber is wrong—and hours after the self-driving service's launch the state sent a letter saying the service was illegal because it lacked the permits. "If Uber does not confirm immediately that it will stop its launch and seek a testing permit, DMV will initiate legal action," DMV Chief Counsel Brian Soublet wrote the company. He referenced the possibility of taking Uber to court. San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee joined the chorus of officials denouncing the move, calling it unlawful and ill-advised in a statement. Lee said he was worried about the safety of the city's cyclists and pedestrians, especially with the experiment launching in a week when streets are slick with rain. Meanwhile, the company is sending another message to California: Other places want us if you don't. In a blog post Wednesday, the leader of its self-driving efforts, Anthony Levandowski, warned that "complex rules and requirements could have the unintended consequence of slowing innovation" and named several places outside California he characterized as being "pro technology." Explore further: California, Uber in legal showdown over self-driving cars


News Article | October 26, 2016
Site: www.nytimes.com

Participants in a teaching demonstration that is led by medical and museum educators inspecting an Umberto Boccioni sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art.


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.npr.org

NPR's Robert Siegel speaks with Paola Antonelli, senior curator at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, about the museum's recent acquisition of the original emoji for its permanent collection.


News Article | April 14, 2016
Site: www.fastcompany.com

Fast Company editor Linda Tischler died Monday after a long illness. Linda started at Fast Company in 2000 and pioneered the magazine's design coverage at a time when few, if any, mainstream publications paid attention to design. Through her exuberant stories on everyone from architect Michael Graves to industrial designer Yves Béhar, she highlighted both the business of design and the importance of design in business. It is much to her credit that design has evolved into a core business practice, embraced by companies large and small. Here, we asked colleagues and friends to share memories of Linda.—Eds. Gadi Amit, founder, NewDealDesign I met Linda at a Fast Company event, when the economy was in a rut. At first, I was quite shy about approaching her, but we started chatting and when I suggested that we should pay more attention to design for the middle class—and less for the 1%—she lit up. With her warmth and intelligence, she said, "Okay, why don’t you do that? Write something!" The whole discourse around the democratization of design—Linda had a huge role in that. She always had a social conscience. Paola Antonelli, senior curator of architecture and design, Museum of Modern Art I have great memories of Linda in many different places—at MIT's Media Lab and at the Aspen Ideas festival, at MoMA at my marathon events and at evening panels with young designers. Everywhere, she was my kindred spirit, holding the design flag high with intelligence, open-mindedness, and generosity. Everywhere, her eyes pierced the air like curious, bemused laser beams, crowned by her bob that reminded me of my favorite Italian singer when I was a child. She was a force. She loved design and was able to explain it to all, very simply, honestly, and elegantly. I will personally miss her tremendously, and so will the design world. Rinat Aruh, cofounder, aruliden Linda taught me about what really mattered. Not just about design, but about friendships, business, and people. She always had to time to listen, looked out for me and gave the most appreciated feedback—straight to the point without any fluff! She was our biggest champion, constantly encouraging us to keep doing what we do while sharing her point of view with enthusiasm and humor! I will miss her dearly. Caroline Baumann, Director, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum LINDA=LIGHT. Linda Tischler spread light through her magnetic personality and that one-of-a-kind smile, and her unique embrace and celebration of design. She illuminated minds with the way she wrote and talked about design, and encouraged teens year after year to pursue careers in design at Cooper Hewitt’s Teen Design Fair. She was an irreplaceable model for them and for all of us—to share positivity, excitement and generosity. We miss you Linda. Yves Béhar, founder, fuseproject Through great times and tough ones Linda was a force with a smile. She was understanding and inquisitive, always curious about the world. I will never forget those qualities, and aspire to them. A couple of years ago, we spoke on stage at the Aspen Ideas Festival—it was fun and entertaining, it was just a solid human conversation about design and life. And this moment reminded me of how every conversation with Linda was always just that: a human story at the center of design. All of us designers are lucky she applied her talent and wit to design. I am lucky to have known her. It aches to say it: So long Linda. Dror Benshetrit, founder, Dror In 2002, I launched my design practice as a hopeful 25-year-old and shortly thereafter, met Linda. To this day, I count our meeting as one of my luckiest stars. Growing to become a supporter, mentor, and friend, she has been a pivotable force in my career, and I’m sure I’m not the only one for whom that holds true. In any instance, whether it be through her Fast Company articles, book with David Butler or speaking engagements, she radiated kindness, positivity, and love. Linda, I will miss you. Tim Brown, president and CEO, IDEO Linda was a great advocate for design thinking. My best memory of working with her was at the opening address of Bill Clinton’s Global Initiative conference. She was going through chemotherapy at the time, but you would never have known it. We were both sitting in the green room feeling very out of place alongside President Clinton, Queen Rania of Jordan and Jim Yong Kim, President of the World Bank. But once we got on stage we relaxed in each other's company and had an inspiring conversation about the role of design in social innovation. Her willingness to stand up for design in business and society, even when she was going through her own health challenges, was a great example for all of us. Design will miss her voice. Ken Carbone, founding partner, Carbone Smolan Agency Every designer owes Linda their deep gratitude. Linda was a courageous champion for all design disciplines and no one expressed the value of what we do better that her. Through her brilliance, curiosity and generous spirit, her influence on design and business was nothing short of singular. Beth Dickstein, founder, BDE If you're lucky, you get to work with good people. If your luckier, you get to make a great friend. I was luckier, as Linda and I were great friends. One I will miss tremendously. Her brilliance, humor, generosity and warmth were always there. When her illness was getting worse, I said, "I'll pray for you everyday." In her wonderful witty way she said, "Okay, better put it in overdrive, baby." I know the industry lost a dynamo, a straight shooter, a true journalist. Her family lost an irreplaceable force. I lost an amazing and caring friend. Tyler Gray, former editorial director, FastCompany.com I took over Linda's office at Fast Company when she stopped coming in. I remember finding the bottom drawer meticulously organized with clips and past issues of FC. I stacked them up and barely moved them because it felt like she was the steward of our archive. When people came in to ask about something we'd covered I half pretended it was me who kept that archive—not sure if anyone actually did other than her. The fib only stretched so far, though. She had dog-eared pages and Post-it notes on issues she clearly referred to often. Most people, including me, wouldn't have the patience today for that kind of thing these days without some sort of digital interface with search capabilities. Linda was a rare breed who could straddle the digital and analog worlds, with a mind that could slipstream through either. She commanded the respect of designers and architects and artists and brands—without ever seeming like she was relenting to anyone's will than he own. I've spent the evening reading through old emails we shared. I found this one, after she learned about her cancer, about the same time I learned about my mom's. "This stuff is scary as hell," she wrote, then referenced a Boston cancer institution. "When they handed me my little blue Dana-Farber card I thought, 'Shit! This is a club I never wanted to belong to!' but there you have it, and I guess you have to play the hand you're dealt. I'm going to give it my best shot." Walter Herbst, professor, Segal Design Institute, Northwestern University Like all who met her, it was an instant love affair. Linda visited our Management program in Product Design and Development at Northwestern University, some years back, which started it all. I invited Linda to speak at our annual design event, Design Chicago, which I knew came at the same time as the Milan Fair. She quickly shot back, that she had seen enough chairs in her life, and agreed to come. She captured the entire audience, which included our own design and development master’s students as well as our Kellogg MBA’s, our engineering students, as well as the president and the Deans of the university. Her influential talk may have led to what Northwestern University has now—"Design" as one of our pillars. We were always checking in, and she was always finding time to talk about our kids and of course design. I will miss her, as will everyone who knew her. David Kelley, founder, IDEO and Stanford d.school Most people know Linda for her hugely generous support of design. But what not everyone may know is how her work connected people. She was the first to break the story of my cancer publicly in a piece she wrote in 2009 about design thinking. For her to tell the story in such a caring, thoughtful, sensitive way helped me have the conversation with others. Her writing engendered so much empathy. People shared their stories with me, and I bonded with those who’d gone through it themselves. Knowing how difficult that experience was, I admired Linda’s strength in soldiering on and not making a big deal about her own illness. In the piece she wrote, she quoted me about the moment we started calling ourselves design thinkers: "I'm not a words person, but in my life, it's the most powerful moment that words or labeling ever made. Because then it all made sense." Linda was a words person, and what she wrote changed the world of design, and lives like mine, too. Judy Klavin, president, Kalvin Public Relations Nobody covered the intersection of design and business the way Linda did. We started working together in 2008 when I arranged meetings for her with my design firm clients. Before the meeting, we’d spend hours reviewing story ideas that we thought for sure she’d be interested in. Then she’d zero in on a completely different angle or something she saw on a designer’s desk that caught her eye. And, the story she’d develop and write was always smart and engaging. Shortly after, she was recruiting design leaders to be guest bloggers on the inaugural FastCoDesign site. She had a gift for encouraging the creative community to articulate their vision and bring it to life. I am so grateful for her friendship, honesty, insight and determination. Thank you, Linda, for uncovering so many stories that might never have been told. We all learned so much from you. Cliff Kuang, founding editor, Co.Design Linda was a giant. Our readers today often remark how Fast Company has brought design into the realm of business and innovation; Linda pioneered that ideal as an editor here in the early 2000s. Moreover, she kept with it. Through the relationships she cultivated in the profession, she helped make the very first iterations of FastCompany.com into a platform for designers to be heard. And it was because she believed in the power of design, and she believed in the optimism inherent in making the world a little bit better with the things you do every day. All of us at Fast Company, who've found our careers bringing design stories to the world, owe Linda a debt. Hopefully, we can repay it by continuing the work. Stuart Leslie, president, 4sight Inc. Conversations with Linda about design were always the highlight of my day and I looked forward to each one. Her enthusiasm in understanding the unique angles she was exploring was contagious and left me energized, thinking differently about design each time. What a rare treat it was to be able to escape the day to day routine and have a few minutes of thought provoking discussion to remind me of all the reasons I became a designer. Bruce Nussbaum, writer The truth is, I did not know Linda personally but professionally. She was my only real competitor covering the juncture of business and design, and I followed her work obsessively (because she kicked my butt consistently). So much written about Linda focusses on her warmth and humanity, and I'm sure that's true. But the Linda that was in my life was the killer journalist who had the best sources and wrote the deepest analyses of the most important design issues of the moment. She saw design in terms of relevance to people and tools to solve social problems. I saw Linda's immense humanity through the lens of her work. She made me a better journalist and a better person. Clive Roux, CEO, The Society for Experiential Graphic Design Few people from the media understand the role of design like Linda did. That's a fact. However, what is perhaps less understood is the role Linda played FOR designers. She was trusted. We're ideas and picture people. Words escape us usually. Linda had our back there. What made her stand apart was that she did not view design as another topic to be milked. She really believed in the power of good that it could do in the world. Danielle Sacks, senior editor, Inc. The first time I encountered Linda Tischler was through her words. I was 25, and had just started my first journalism job as a lowly fact checker at Fast Company. I was fact checking a colorful profile on Howard Dean’s campaign manager, Joe Trippi, written by a senior writer at the magazine—Linda Tischler—who I had yet to meet. I was taken with the story’s attitude, its writerly flair. I needed to meet this Linda woman. Little did I know that Linda and I would soon become fast friends, despite the years between us. She became the person I decided I wanted to become when I "grew up." As a young writer, she always took me seriously as a peer, even though I was learning what she had already been doing for decades. When she began immersing herself more deeply in the design world, she let me pick up the pieces of the advertising beat, which she had once carved out for herself. But she graciously relished in watching me take it on, and we’d gab endlessly about stories and reporting strategies and industry scuttlebutt. She was able to do what very few writers can—she wrote just as she spoke. When you read her work, you could hear her whispering in your ear—her sharp sense of humor, her wit, her word choices, her energetic voice always filled equally with edge and compassion. She’d pluck a word out of thin air that wouldn’t reveal pretension, but her dimension, her worldliness, her many selves as a lover of language, of culture, of the arts. And she was timeless, ageless. Her stories had the hipness and energy of a twentysomething, with the depth and perspective of a much wiser soul. She could go head to head with anyone—and you’d want to be a fly on the wall to watch. Thirteen years since we first met, Linda is still the woman I want to be when I grow up. She managed to raise two children whom she was fiercely protective of, become a grandmother (albeit, too briefly), a domestic goddess and a feminist, and a successful career journalist who left the field different than she found it. She has helped me navigate my journalistic career with two young kids, just as she did. She has been an incredible friend, making me laugh even during her darkest days with cancer. From a hospital bed, she managed to turn the most mundane, ugly moments into a rollicking, laugh out loud story. It’s hard to imagine a world without another Linda Tischler conversation. Chuck Salter, senior editor, Fast Company For years, I had the best seat at Fast Company’s New York offices: the one next to Linda Tischler. Our friendship traced back to the magazine’s early years, when we bonded over our newspaper backgrounds. But we had always worked out of different cities. In New York, we became next-desk neighbors. Hearing Linda do countless interviews gave me a deeper appreciation of her craft—how she tirelessly developed and worked her design beat, how quickly she thought on her feet to dig another layer deep, and how she treated people. No wonder her subjects trusted her enough to open up: She was fearlessly human—candid, curious, funny, empathetic. Long before facing cancer herself, she wrote memorably about the professional and personal impact of the disease on the designer Michael Graves and IDEO’s Tom Kelley. Linda was a generous spirit in a business that’s often competitive and territorial. She shared sources, story ideas, an honest critique — and so much of her time. Her gushy emails when she connected you to a source could make you blush. As anyone who knew her will attest, Linda was a force. A veteran journalist wired with the energy of a 25-year-old. A critical and creative thinker. A prolific and elegant writer. A devoted friend. My inbox is filled with emails that start more or less, "How are you?"—after a big story, the birth of my son, my mom’s heart surgery. Being friends with Linda made you almost like another beat that she followed with the utmost attention. I will miss her terribly. Fortunately, her voice remains, not just in her stories, but in our wonderfully rambling email conversations over 16 years. In recent years, although I knew she was often struggling with chemo or pain, she sounded as vibrant and irreverent as ever. In December, she joked that the implant she was getting for pain might let her stream the new season of "Transparent." Cancer took her life but not her soul, and definitely not her humor. She wouldn’t let it. That much was clear from one of her earlier notes to me following her diagnosis: And later, from another note: That was, and to my mind, will always be, Linda. Ravi Sawhney, founder, RKS Linda Tischler was such an incredible person, one of the truly inspirational, loving, insightful and passionate ones. There was a certain spirituality in Linda that I always wanted to be close to and valued dearly. She showed incredible strength and optimism as she battled her cancer, never giving up. I feel blessed to have crossed paths with her, to have become friends, and to have had many conversations about life, design, politics, and mortality. There are those who not only touch your life but somehow become part of the fabric of your world. Linda was such a person, as all her friends and family would tell you. She’ll be so dearly missed. Leslie Smolan, founding partner, Carbone Smolan Agency Linda Tischler was my design hero. She could also be called a design aficionado, advocate, supporter, inquirer, explorer, groupie, devotee, maniac, evangelist and connoisseur. She loved design and designers. And she loved to tell the world about us — what we do, why we do it, and why it matters. Losing Linda means we’ve lost an incredibly important voice in the ongoing dialogue about design. And we’ve lost an incredibly kind and generous friend. Bill Taylor, cofounder, Fast Company I’m sure that many of the tributes to and remembrances of Linda will focus on her wit and smarts, her mastery of design, and the legacy of articles and books she left behind. But as I have reflected over the last two days, saddened and stunned at her passing, I thought back to that often-repeated quote from Maya Angelou: "People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel." I will never forget how Linda made me, and all her colleagues in the early days of Fast Company, feel. She was an essential part of Fast Company during the crazy boom times, she was there for the dark and challenging down times, and she was my office next-door neighbor for a chunk of that time. Every single day, she was one of the few grown-ups in an organization filled (professionally speaking) with gangly adolescents. To many of the young people on the staff, she was a mentor and a sounding board. To me, she was a peer, a pal, a trusted colleague to whom I looked for advice and reassurance. Linda exuded a sense of quiet strength, of emotional and intellectual maturity, that is all-too-rare in the world in general, and in the world of media in particular. Those times when I would stroll into her office, pull up a chair, and say, simply "Do you have ten minutes to talk through something?" were some of the best times of my week. Truth be told, I can’t remember much of what she said in those conversations so many years ago, or what I did as a result of them. But I remember like yesterday how they made me feel. And I feel so blessed to have known and worked with Linda. Rick Tetzeli, editor-at-large, Fast Company When I came to Fast Company in 2010, I arrived with one question: Why does this magazine spend so much time on design coverage? It didn't take me long to figure out the answer, thanks to Linda. Editing her stories, and listening to her patient, humorous, skeptical, and good-natured explanations, I came to understand that the best design writing shows readers how gnarly problems get solved creatively. Linda had been doing this for years—she was a real pioneer. But she was wide open to telling those stories in new ways. One of my favorite experiences with her was working together on a story about architect Bjarke Ingels. As we discussed Ingels, she talked about his energy, his intellectual agility, his almost superhuman capacity for complex projects across the world. We decided that the best way to tell the story was through a comic strip, and the result was one of the freshest things I've worked on at Fast Company. The story delighted Linda, who loved the challenge of continually expressing herself—and highlighting work she deeply admired—in new ways. At its best, Fast Company encourages original thinking across creative enterprises. Linda lived this. My daughters attend a school that's just a couple of blocks from Ingels' recently completed apartment complex on West 57th Street in Manhattan, which was featured in our comic strip. In the midst of that dreary neighborhood of glass blocks, Ingels' building stands out for its angular optimism, a bold, light and unusual burst of energy. Kind of like Linda. We will all miss her deeply. She had spirit to spare, and we are lucky she shared it with us. Alissa Walker, writer, Gizmodo (via Facebook) Even if you didn't know Linda Tischler you very likely read one of her stories in Fast Company over the years. She was a true champion of the design industry, introducing this sometimes complicated world to the mainstream press and explaining its importance in an incredibly accessible way. She was also a great friend and mentor to me in those early days of my writing career. I will never forget her pulling me aside at one of Fast Company's first design events—after she had moderated a panel with her signature quick wit—and telling me that us ladies in design had to stick together. I will miss reading her work and knowing she was always on my side. Alan Webber, cofounder, Fast Company Everyone knows that magazining is a team sport. That’s even more true in the early days of a magazine, when it takes everyone on the team to figure out what it is you’re trying to do, not only in the pages of the magazine when it comes out, but also in the creation of the ideas that go into the magazine, the culture of the office where there’s no substitute for good energy, all the things that create magic and sustain it. That was Linda. She got it. She relished it, for the very first moment of the first day. It was like she’d been invited to be one of the hosts of the very best party you could ever hope to throw or attend. You could see it in her smile, her enthusiasm for the whole venture/adventure. Infectious energy, unstinting generosity, unlimited colleagueship—and of course, remarkable talent, curiosity, work ethic, and heart. One of the early tenets of Fast Company was that a great organization needs leaders at all levels. Linda was a leader—without seeking a leadership role. Sure, she was smart and able and good at her job. But the thing about Fast Company was, it never was all that clear what your job was, except to demonstrate every day that we were all in it together, and that none of us was as smart as all of us—and she was one of the people who lived that and made it happen. A magazine is the people who put it out. We were incredibly fortunate to have Linda to help put it out. I loved her then and I will always love her. If you'd like to share a story about Linda, email slabarre at fastcompany dot com.


News Article | September 8, 2016
Site: www.gwec.net

Recharge’s latest Thought Leaders Roundtable in Rio de Janeiro brought together 45 leaders of the local and international wind industry at the city’s Museum of Modern Art, setting the tone for the following three days of debate at the Brazil Windpower Congress – the largest wind event in the country.


News Article | December 1, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Focus Fires’ quintessential fireplace, the Gyrofocus, was born in the late 1960s but feels as contemporary and cutting edge as ever. It has been exhibited in multiple fine arts museums around the world, including the Guggenheim Museum in New York City. In 2009, the Pulchra competition was launched in Italy and in its first year, competing against more than 100 beautifully designed objects, the Gyrofocus took the highest honors, chosen by voters as ‘Le cose più belle del mondo’ or ‘‘World’s most beautiful object." The origin of Focus Fires dates back to 1967. It was cold in the south of France and Dominique Imbert was restoring a ruined farmhouse, stone by stone, in the village of Viols-le-Fort. With salvaged scraps of metal, the former humanities professor, with a passion for metalwork, addressed this problem by forging his first fireplace. A smoldering smile of iron hanging from the sky: the first Focus was born. A year later, this first fireplace would give rise to a second, which was revolutionary in every sense of the word. As with its predecessor, the fireplace was suspended, but this time the hearth could pivot 360° to face any direction. Several enthusiastic friends wanted their own ‘rotating hearth’ – gyrofocus in Latin. And thus began the history of Focus and its iconic Gyrofocus fireplace. This partnership, between Focus and European Home, will allow customers throughout North America to have local access to these famous designs. European Home has a channel of over 100 hearth product retailers who specialize in selling to high-end homeowners, builders, architects and designers. “Our channel of upscale fireplace dealers are excited to offer Focus Fires to their customer base,” said European Home owner, Holly Markham. Through European Home, over 20 Focus models are now being distributed to the United States and Canada. About Focus It was in 1967 that sculptor Dominique Imbert created his first fireplace for his own personal use in his studio at the base of the Cévennes in the south of France. He then reproduced it for several enthusiastic viewers, and so began the history of Focus. Focus designs have been featured in such wide-ranging settings as stylish living rooms and some of the world’s most prestigious design museums (for example, the Guggenheim Museum in New York and the Museum of Modern Art in Stockholm) and have been awarded numerous international distinctions. Focus employs over 80 people between their manufacturing and business facilities. About European Home Located north of Boston, in Middleton, Massachusetts, European Home was one of the first companies in North America to offer modern fireplaces. Developed as a niche industry in 2003 and now becoming mainstream, owners Holly and John Markham continue to bring stunning, high-quality, design-oriented hearth products to the North American market. European Home employs 15 people. In addition to distributing Focus fireplaces, European Home also distributes the Element4 line as well as manufactures its own line in the U.S. Products are distributed in North America through regional fireplace stores.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.wired.com

Viewed from afar, Sohei Nishino’s large scale photomontages resemble maps of the world’s great cities. Paris. New York. Hong Kong. Get closer, and they burst with unexpected scales, moments, and juxtapositions. Landmarks like the the Brandenberg Gate or Golden Gate Bridge stand out in a mosaic of images. A constellation of satellite dishes denotes a neighborhood in Istanbul, boisterous dancing crowds represent the streets of Havana, pixelated water and boats show the Huangpu River in Shanghai. Nishino’s ongoing series Diorama Maps represents his experiences wandering through more than a dozen cities, and creating a new way of viewing them. “I started to see the city almost like a living creature, which has personality,” he says. They’re reality, seen through memories. The Japanese artist spent as long as three months exploring each city on foot, shooting hundreds of rolls of film (yes, film). Back in his studio, he spent months more pasting together hundreds of images cut from his printed (yes, printed) contact sheets. The analog nature of this work, now appearing at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery in New York and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, have a nostalgic feel, bringing to mind the Plan de Paris or or a scrapbook. “By touching the films, making contact sheets in the darkroom, cutting the paper with scissors, all these processes help me bring back my memory of the time I spent in the city,” Nishino says. Nishino drew inspiration from Inō Tadataka, the 18th Century cartographer who created some of Japan’s first accurate maps during more than a decade spent surveying the country on foot. Like Tadataka, Nishino is a pioneer, but in a different way; creating subjective, personal maps that convey his impressions and experiences within the context of a city’s geography. “It’s not like a Google Map,” he says. “Each person can draw a different map in his head, deformed by memory and shaped by smells, sounds, and people. It’s shaped by the feeling of a city.”


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

New York's MoMA PS1 will feature a shelter installation that uses robotically-knitted solar fabrics that absorb and release light. Winner of the art institution's Young Architects Program competition, the canopy from Jenny Sabin Studio is photo-luminescent by night and cooling by day, with a misting system that delivers a cooling spray when someone comes near. Headed by designer Jenny Sabin, professor of architecture at Cornell University, Lumen, as the project is named, opens in June at MoMAs PS1's courtyard in Long Island City. The installation is set up during the center's annual Warm Up outdoor music series, and thus parameters of the contest included developing "creative designs for a temporary, outdoor installation that provides shade, seating, and water," according to MoMA PS1, which is a part of the Museum of Modern Art dedicated to contemporary art. The intent is a "socially and environmentally responsive structure" that reacts to heat and sunlight, as well as the bodies of visitors who enter the site. Using the latest textile-based technologies, including solar-active and photo-luminescent yarn, Sabin digitally designs the shapes and objects of the installation. They're wound and woven with a giant robotic arm, an additive type of technology used in digital fabrication and 3D printing. For seating, about 100 recycled and deconstructed spools are woven with the same photo-luminescent yarns. "The project is informed by my expertise in emerging technologies and computational design, coming from cell biology and cellular networks and how forms operate in biology," says Sabin, who adds that her use of the high-tech, responsive materials started with a project for Nike in 2012. The installation includes long fabric tubes that hang from the canopy stalactite style, and make up part of the site's multi-sensory environment. During the day, visitors can take relief from the summer heat under the canopy, which allows in dapples of sunlight while occasionally spraying visitors with a misting system incorporated into the openings of those hanging tubes. The misting is activated by sensors that respond to movement. Three 30-ft (9-m) towers help anchor the tension canopy, and hold large water bladders that feed the network of tubes that connect to the misting system. "It's a simple detection network, so when you come close, the misters will slowly start to mist," Sabin says. With up to 3,000 visitors expected to the festival, a master control allows the misting to be put on pause if a big crowd enters the site, while some areas will be on a regular misting cycle. At night, visitors to the instillation have a different experience, with the solar active material in the canopy, stalactite tubes and stools giving off a phosphorescent glow that "inspires levity and enjoyment with the space," says Sabin. "The photo-luminescent fabric absorbs UV sunlight, and then they slowly emit light." These solar active materials have so far been used primarily for clothing, sports equipment, medical uniforms and paints. But as far as Sabin knows, she's the first to incorporate them into an architectural context. "The idea is not only that the material is changing, but the architecture actually absorbs and delivers light," says Sabin, "which offers untold prospects for materials in architecture, having a degree of responsiveness." Sabin heads up the Sabin Design Lab at Cornell, which mixes research and computational design, data visualization and digital fabrication. Her work explores the intersection of architecture and science, and incorporates biological and mathematical theories in design.

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