Museum and Art Gallery Northern Territory

Darwin, Australia

Museum and Art Gallery Northern Territory

Darwin, Australia
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Glasby C.J.,Museum and Art Gallery Northern Territory | Lee Y.-L.,National University of Singapore | Hsueh P.-W.,National Chung Hsing University
Raffles Bulletin of Zoology | Year: 2016

An annotated checklist of 1257 species (73 families) of Annelida from the South China Sea (SCS) is presented, including 289 species originally described from the region. The remaining extralimital records (968) are likely to represent a mixture of species complexes, misidentifications or truly widespread species, and therefore should be targets for future taxonomic study. The occurrence of each species within each of seven subregions is reported, with the majority (72%) of species only occurring in a single region. The annelid diversity of Singapore is estimated to be 121 species and 37 families. Families showing the highest levels of diversity in the SCS are the Nereididae (134 species), Syllidae (100), Polynoidae (76), Serpulidae (72), Spionidae (60), and Eunicidae (59). By comparison, both Nereididae and Syllidae are found to be more diverse in the SCS than the Australia region. For the Nereididae, this is likely to be the result of this group’s capacity to tolerate low salinities, which would give its members a selective advantage over other annelids in a region that experiences high freshwater input (river flow and precipitation). In the case of Syllidae, it may be the result of taxonomic bias. The SCS region is home to 19 species that are utilised directly by humans, either as bait, food for penaeid aquaculture or, in few cases, human consumption. © National University of Singapore.


Lee Y.-L.,National University of Singapore | Glasby C.J.,Museum and Art Gallery Northern Territory
Raffles Bulletin of Zoology | Year: 2015

A new cryptic species of Neanthes (Nereididae), N. wilsonchani, new species, is described from intertidal mudflats of eastern Singapore. The new species was confused with both Ceratonereis (Composetia) burmensis (Monro, 1937) and Neanthes glandicincta Southern, 1921, which were found to be conspecific with the latter name having priority. Neanthes glandicincta is newly recorded from Singapore, its reproductive forms (epitokes) are redescribed, and Singapore specimens are compared with topotype material from India. The new species can be distinguished from N. glandicincta by slight body colour differences and by having fewer pharyngeal paragnaths in Areas II (4–8 vs 7–21), III (11–28 vs 30–63) and IV (1–9 vs 7–20), and in the total number of paragnaths for all Areas (16–41 vs 70–113). No significant differences were found in the morphology of the epitokes between the two species. The two species have largely non-overlapping distributions in Singapore; the new species is restricted to Pleistocene coastal alluvium in eastern Singapore, while N. glandicinta occurs in western Singapore as well as in Malaysia and westward to India. © National University of Singapore.


Aguado M.T.,Autonomous University of Madrid | Glasby C.J.,Museum and Art Gallery Northern Territory
Systematics and Biodiversity | Year: 2015

The geographic distribution of three intriguing genera of Syllidae (Annelida, Phyllodocida), Alcyonosyllis, Paraopisthosyllis and Megasyllis, is restricted to the Pacific Ocean, Indian Ocean and the Red Sea. In this study new material of several species in all three genera is identified, and the distributions of the species and genera refined; four species of Alcyonosyllis were found to have increased ranges. Additionally, one new species of Paraopisthosyllis is described. Paraopisthosyllis pardus sp. nov. is characterized by having long bidentate bladed-chaetae, segments covered by small papillae, and a colour pattern consisting in dark red-brown antennae and dorsal cirri and several transversal dark red-brown lines per segment. The three genera share several striking morphological characteristics, such as alternation in the arrangement of dorsal cirri, wide segments with secondary annuli and bright, contrasting colour patterns. Alcyonosyllis species are found in association with other organisms, most noticeably anthozoans, whereas members of Paraopisthosyllis and Megasyllis are free living. Molecular information (sequences of DNA) from Alcyonosyllis species (including the type species, A. phili), and the type of Megasyllis (M. corruscans) is included herein for the first time in a phylogenetic analysis. A phylogenetic analysis performed through different methods (Maximum parsimony and Maximum likelihood) using sequences of three genes (18S, 16S and COI) reveals that all the three genera form a monophyletic group within Syllidae, with several synapomorphies, and a common ancestor probably from the Indo-Pacific. Their geographic distribution pattern, the relationships between these genera and the rest of syllids, and the symbiosis in Alcyonosyllis are discussed. © 2015 © The Trustees of the Natural History Museum, London 2015. All Rights Reserved.


Kodandaramaiah U.,University of Stockholm | Pena C.,National Major San Marcos University | Braby M.F.,Museum and Art Gallery Northern Territory | Braby M.F.,Australian National University | And 5 more authors.
Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution | Year: 2010

We report a rapid radiation of a group of butterflies within the family Nymphalidae and examine some aspects of popular analytical methods in dealing with rapid radiations. We attempted to infer the phylogeny of butterflies belonging to the subtribe Coenonymphina sensu lato using five genes (4398 bp) with Maximum Parsimony, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian analyses. Initial analyses suggested that the group has undergone rapid speciation within Australasia. We further analyzed the dataset with different outgroup combinations the choice of which had a profound effect on relationships within the ingroup. Modelling methods recovered Coenonymphina as a monophyletic group to the exclusion of Zipaetis and Orsotriaena, irrespective of outgroup combination. Maximum Parsimony occasionally returned a polyphyletic Coenonymphina, with Argyronympha grouping with outgroups, but this was strongly dependent on the outgroups used. We analyzed the ingroup without any outgroups and found that the relationships inferred among taxa were different from those inferred when either of the outgroup combinations was used, and this was true for all methods. We also tested whether a hard polytomy is a better hypothesis to explain our dataset, but could not find conclusive evidence. We therefore conclude that the major lineages within Coenonymphina form a near-hard polytomy with regard to each other. The study highlights the importance of testing different outgroups rather than using results from a single outgroup combination of a few taxa, particularly in difficult cases where basal nodes appear to receive low support. We provide a revised classification of Coenonymphina; Zipaetis and Orsotriaena are transferred to the tribe Eritina. © 2009 Elsevier Inc.


Bowman D.M.J.S.,University of Tasmania | Brown G.K.,University of Melbourne | Braby M.F.,Museum and Art Gallery Northern Territory | Braby M.F.,Australian National University | And 11 more authors.
Journal of Biogeography | Year: 2010

Aim This paper reviews the biogeography of the Australian monsoon tropical biome to highlight general patterns in the distribution of a range of organisms and their environmental correlates and evolutionary history, as well as to identify knowledge gaps. Location Northern Australia, Australian Monsoon Tropics (AMT). The AMT is defined by areas that receive more than 85% of rainfall between November and April. Methods Literature is summarized, including the origin of the monsoon climate, present-day environment, biota and habitat types, and phylogenetic and geographical relationships of selected organisms. Results Some species are widespread throughout the AMT while others are narrow-range endemics. Such contrasting distributions correspond to present-day climates, hydrologies (particularly floodplains), geological features (such as sandstone plateaux), fire regimes, and vegetation types (ranging from rain forest to savanna). Biogeographical and phylogenetic studies of terrestrial plants (e.g. eucalypts) and animals (vertebrates and invertebrates) suggest that distinct bioregions within the AMT reflect the aggregated effects of landscape and environmental history, although more research is required to determine and refine the boundaries of biogeographical zones within the AMT. Phylogenetic analyses of aquatic organisms (fishes and prawns) suggest histories of associations with drainage systems, dispersal barriers, links to New Guinea, and the existence of Lake Carpentaria, now submerged by the Gulf of Carpentaria. Complex adaptations to the landscape and climate in the AMT are illustrated by a number of species. Main conclusions The Australian monsoon is a component of a single global climate system, characterized by a dominant equator-spanning Hadley cell. Evidence of hot, seasonally moist climates dates back to the Late Eocene, implying that certain endemic elements of the AMT biota have a long history. Vicariant differentiation is inferred to have separated the Kimberley and Arnhem Land bioregions from Cape York Peninsula/northern Queensland. Such older patterns are overlaid by younger events, including dispersal from Southeast Asia, and range expansions and contractions. Future palaeoecological and phylogenetic investigations will illuminate the evolution of the AMT biome. Understanding the biogeography of the AMT is essential to provide a framework for ecological studies and the sustainable development of the region. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Neave M.J.,Charles Darwin University | Glasby C.J.,Museum and Art Gallery Northern Territory
Organisms Diversity and Evolution | Year: 2013

Three species of the genus Ophelina are described from northern Australian waters. Ophelina fauveli (Caullery, 1944) is reported for the first time in Australian waters and its description has been updated; the two other species are new to science and are formally described. The main diagnostic characters for the species are based on differences in the pygidial funnel. Ophelina tessellata sp. nov. is distinguished by having a club-shaped funnel with a distinctive tessellated pattern on the ventral edge. Ophelina cyprophilia sp. nov. has a more elongated pygidial funnel and fewer rim cirri. Recognition of these two morphologically similar species was supported by sequences of the cytochrome oxidase I and histone H3 genes. © 2013 Gesellschaft für Biologische Systematik.


Neave M.J.,Charles Darwin University | Streten-Joyce C.,Charles Darwin University | Glasby C.J.,Museum and Art Gallery Northern Territory | McGuinness K.A.,Charles Darwin University | And 2 more authors.
Microbial Ecology | Year: 2012

Tolerant species of polychaete worms can survive in polluted environments using various resistance mechanisms. One aspect of resistance not often studied in polychaetes is their association with symbiotic bacteria, some of which have resistance to metals and may help the organism to survive. We used "next generation" 454 sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA sequences associated with polychaetes from a copper and zinc-polluted harbor and from a reference site to determine bacterial community structure. We found changes in the bacteria at the polluted site, including increases in the abundance of bacteria from the order Alteromonadales. These changes in the bacteria associated with polychaetes may be relatively easy to detect and could be a useful indicator of metal pollution. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Glasby C.J.,Museum and Art Gallery Northern Territory
Zootaxa | Year: 2015

Nereididae is one of the most ubiquitous of polychaete families, yet knowledge of their diversity in the northern Great Barrier Reef is poor; few species have been previously reported from any of the atolls or islands including Lizard Island. In this study, the diversity of the family from Lizard Island and surrounding reefs is documented based on museum collections derived from surveys conducted mostly over the last seven years. The Lizard Island nereidid fauna was found to be represented by 14 genera and 38 species/species groups, including 11 putative new species. Twelve species are newly reported from Lizard Island; four of these are also first records for Australia. For each genus and species, diagnoses and/or taxonomic remarks are provided in addition to notes on their habitat on Lizard Island, and general distribution; the existence of tissue samples tied to vouchered museum specimens is indicated. Fluorescence photography is used to help distinguish closely similar species of Nereis and Platynereis. A key is provided to facilitate identification and encourage further taxonomic, molecular and ecological studies on the group. © 2015 Magnolia Press.


Larson H.K.,Museum and Art Gallery Northern Territory
Ichthyological Exploration of Freshwaters | Year: 2010

The gobiid fish genus Redigobius, with 44 putative species, was revised, and found to include 12 species, which are redescribed here. Two new species, from Fiji and from northern Australia and New Guinea, are described: R. lekutu and R. nanus. Redigobius belongs to the subfamily Gobionellinae, and is one of the most plesiomorphic genera of that subfamily. It is probably most closely related to Pseudogobiopsis. Redigobius can be distinguished from other genera in the subfamily by a combination of characters, including: dorsal-fin rays I,6-8; anal-fin rays I,6-7; modally with one more ray in second dorsal fin than in anal fin; 17 segmented caudal rays; sensory canals on head with complete oculoscapular and preopercular canals and pores; sensory papillae arranged in longitudinal pattern, jaws terminal, males usually with enlarged mouths; 11-12 precaudal and 14-16 caudal vertebrae and usually three or four anal-fin pterygiophores before first caudal haemal spine. Redigobius occurs throughout the Indo-west Pacific, in estuarine to fresh water habitats, with R. bikolanus being the most widespread species. © 2010 by Verlag Dr. Friedrich Pfeil.


PubMed | Museum and Art Gallery Northern Territory
Type: | Journal: Zootaxa | Year: 2015

Nereididae is one of the most ubiquitous of polychaete families, yet knowledge of their diversity in the northern Great Barrier Reef is poor; few species have been previously reported from any of the atolls or islands including Lizard Island. In this study, the diversity of the family from Lizard Island and surrounding reefs is documented based on museum collections derived from surveys conducted mostly over the last seven years. The Lizard Island nereidid fauna was found to be represented by 14 genera and 38 species/species groups, including 11 putative new species. Twelve species are newly reported from Lizard Island; four of these are also first records for Australia. For each genus and species, diagnoses and/or taxonomic remarks are provided in addition to notes on their habitat on Lizard Island, and general distribution; the existence of tissue samples tied to vouchered museum specimens is indicated. Fluorescence photography is used to help distinguish closely similar species of Nereis and Platynereis. A key is provided to facilitate identification and encourage further taxonomic, molecular and ecological studies on the group.

Loading Museum and Art Gallery Northern Territory collaborators
Loading Museum and Art Gallery Northern Territory collaborators