Museu Paraense Emlio Goeldi

Belm, Brazil

Museu Paraense Emlio Goeldi

Belm, Brazil
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Trujillo-Arias N.,Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales Bernardino Rivadavia | Dantas G.P.M.,Federal University of Minas Gerais | Dantas G.P.M.,Pontificia University Catolica Of Mina Gerais | Arbelaez-Cortes E.,Institute Investigacion Of Recursos Biologicos Alexander Von Humboldt | And 8 more authors.
Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution | Year: 2017

The Atlantic Forest is separated from the Andean tropical forest by dry and open vegetation biomes (Chaco and Cerrado). Despite this isolation, both rainforests share closely related lineages, which suggest a past connection. This connection could have been important for forest taxa evolution. In this study, we used the Saffron-billed Sparrow (Arremon flavirostris) as a model to evaluate whether the Andean and the Atlantic forests act as a refugia system, as well as to test for a history of biogeographic connection between them. In addition, we evaluated the molecular systematic of intraspecific lineages of the studied species. We modeled the current and past distribution of A. flavirostris, performed phylogeographic analyses based on mitochondrial and nuclear genes, and used Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) analyses to test for biogeographic scenarios. The major phylogeographic disjunction within A. flavirostris was found between the Andean and the Atlantic forests, with a divergence that occurred during the Mid-Pleistocene. Our paleodistribution models indicated a connection between these forest domains in different periods and through both the Chaco and Cerrado. Additionally, the phylogeographic and ABC analyses supported that the Cerrado was the main route of connection between these rainforests, but without giving decisive evidence against a Chaco connection. Our study with A. flavirostris suggest that the biodiversity of the Andean and of the Atlantic forests could have been impacted (and perhaps enriched?) by cycles of connections through the Cerrado and Chaco. This recurrent cycle of connection between the Andean and the Atlantic Forest could have been important for the evolution of Neotropical forest taxa. In addition, we discussed taxonomic implications of the results and proposed to split the studied taxon into two full species. © 2017 Elsevier Inc.


Lo-Man-Hung N.F.,Museu Paraense Emlio Goeldi | Marichal R.,Museu Paraense Emlio Goeldi | Marichal R.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | Candiani D.F.,Museu Paraense Emlio Goeldi | And 15 more authors.
Journal of Arachnology | Year: 2011

The global demand for different land-use practice commodities in the Amazonia is growing, and this region is increasingly affected by the impacts of land management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of land-use intensification on soil spider assemblages from six different land-use systems in Colombia and Brazil. The systems were fallows after crops and pastures, forest, crops, pastures and plantations. Spider species richness and density decreased with increasing farming management intensity. A principal component analysis (PCA) showed forests and fallows were separated from systems with stronger anthropogenic soil disturbance. The relationships of ten spider guilds differed significantly between land-uses, suggesting that they can be a reliable parameter for studies of ecological indicators. © 2011 The American Arachnological Society.

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