Museu de Prehistoria de Valencia

Corona, Spain

Museu de Prehistoria de Valencia

Corona, Spain
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Domenech-Carbo A.,University of Valencia | Domenech-Carbo M.T.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Peiro-Ronda M.A.,Museu de Prehistoria de Valencia | Martinez-Lazaro I.,Instituto Valenciano Of Conservacion | Barrio-Martin J.,Autonomous University of Madrid
Journal of Solid State Electrochemistry | Year: 2012

The application of the voltammetry of microparticles methodology to date archaeological lead artifacts, based on the time-dependent formation of different layers of lead oxides, whose relative amount can be estimated from polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), is presented. This approach is complemented by additional data using square wave voltammetry data. Calibration of the method was performed with the help of a series of welldocumented, lead pieces from the funds of different Spanish museums, covering since the 7th century BC to nowadays. © Springer-Verlag 2012.


Domenech-Carbo A.,University of Valencia | Domenech-Carbo M.T.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Capelo S.,University of Lisbon | Capelo S.,University of Évora | And 2 more authors.
Angewandte Chemie - International Edition | Year: 2014

A method for dating copper/bronze archaeological objects aged in atmospheric environments is proposed based on the specific signals for cuprite and tenorite corrosion products measured through the voltammtry of microparticles method. The tenorite/cuprite ratio increased with the corrosion time and fitted to a potential law that yielded a calibration curve usable for dating purposes. The dating game: A method for dating copper/bronze archaeological objects (see example) aged in atmospheric environments is proposed based on the measurement of specific voltammetric signals for cuprite and tenorite corrosion products. The tenorite/cuprite ratio increased with the corrosion time, fitting to a potential law that yielded a calibration curve usable for dating purposes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Domenech-Carbo M.T.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Buendia-Ortuno M.,Museo Nacional de Arqueologia Subacuatica | Pasies-Oviedo T.,Museu de Prehistoria de Valencia | Osete-Cortina L.,Polytechnic University of Valencia
Microchemical Journal | Year: 2016

This work reports an analytical study conducted prior to the conservation intervention of a collection of elephant tusks excavated from a wreck site of a 600-500 BC Phoenician trading vessel in Bajo de la campana (Murcia, Spain). The conservation state of ivory, determined by prolongated immersion in a marine environment, was established by a multi-technique methodology: light microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy-X-ray microanalysis (FESEM-EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), spectrophotometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The analyses demonstrated that the structure and composition of both tusk parts, namely the inner ivory and outer cementum, were altered due to characteristic diagenetic processes of a marine environment. Ca enrichment was observed in both tusk parts, which gave higher Ca/P molar ratio values than for ideal hydroxyapatite. Mg leaching was observed, together with uptake of exogenous elements (F, Cl, Si, Al, S, Na, Fe, Cu, Sr, Pb, Sn, Ag, V, Ni, Cd and Zn), which were prevalently identified in the external tusk part. Uptake of S and Fe was associated with the neoformation of pyrite framboids. The high carbonate content measured by FTIR, which agreed with the higher Ca/P ratios found in the archaeological tusk, was ascribed to the carbonate substitution of phosphate groups (type-B) in the bioapatite accompanied by some authigenic calcium carbonate that infilled ivory. An increased degree of crystallinity was observed when comparing the values of several crystallinity indices found in the archaeological bioapatite with those of a modern tusk, used as the reference material. Increased crystallinity prevalently took place in the cementum. In accordance with increased crystallinity, the HPO4 2- content index indicated that the hydrated layer of bioapatite nanocrystals diminished in the archaeological tusk, and prevalently in the cementum. All these changes correlated with the significant organic matter loss reported for the archaeological tusk. Interestingly, remaining collagenous matter noticeably altered with enrichment in glycine and depletion in acid amino acids. Changes in the secondary structure of proteins were also recognised and associated with collagen gelatinisation. In addition to proteinaceous materials, small amounts of long-chain fatty acids, monoglycerides and cholesteryl oleate were identified by GC-MS. Cholesteryl oleate was associated with blood, which could have precipitated at the time of specimen death. The identification of large amounts of pyrite framboids and the high oleic acid/palmitic acid ratio in the archaeological tusk suggested minimal oxidative degradation processes, probably due to the slightly anoxic conditions of the underwater Bajo de la campana site environment. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


A study of a sub-recent bone collection recovered on a small carnivore den located near the archaeological site of Sitjar Baix (Onda, Castellón) is presented. The bones show no digestion traces, but toothmarks indicate that the den functioned as a resting place where the prey was transported and consumed but where the predators did not defecate. The features of the site, the spectrum of prey and the retrieval of a fox skull on the surface of the deposit is consistent with the opportunistic behaviour of this canid. The sample, featuring rabbit as the most abundant species, provides interesting data for the interpretation of archaeological lagomorph bone deposits.


This paper deals with the consumption of marine molluscs during the early Neolithic in the central region of eastern Iberia. We analyse the bromatological features of six mala-cological collections recovered from six coastal sites in Valencia: Cova de les Cendres, Cova de Bolumini, Cova Ampia, Costamar, El Bananquet and Tossal de les Basses. We identify two groups that refer to two different ecosystems. On the one hand, there is a rocky coastal ecosystem where Patella outnumbers Osilinus and Stramonita. On the other hand, the explotation of coastal lagoons to gather Cerastoderma glaucum has been recorded in other archaeological sites.


Domenech A.,University of Valencia | Domenech-Carbo M.T.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Pasies T.,Museu de Prehistoria de Valencia | delCarmenBouzas M.,Museu de Prehistoria de Valencia
Electroanalysis | Year: 2012

Two complementary models to describe the long-term corrosion of silver-copper coins, based on potential rate laws for smooth corrosion and those combined with diffusive law, for gross corrosion, are proposed. Theoretical kinetics can be tested using signatures of copper and silver corrosion products using the voltammetry of immobilized particles technique. The method is applied to silver coins minted during the 13 th-14 th centuries from the Libertad street hoard in Valencia (Spain) using non-invasive one-touch graphite pencil sampling. Voltammetric features yield functional dependences in agreement with the proposed model potentially useful for distinguishing between different mints. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Domenech-Carbo A.,University of Valencia | Domenech-Carbo M.T.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Peiro-Ronda M.A.,Museu de Prehistoria de Valencia
Analytical Chemistry | Year: 2011

A methodology for dating archeological lead artifacts based on the voltammetry of microparticles is described. This methodology is based on the comparison of the height of specific voltammetric features from PbO 2 and PbO corrosion products formed under long-term alteration conditions. Calibration of the method was performed with the help of a series of well-documented lead pieces from the funds of different museums of the Comunitat Valenciana (Spain) covering from the fifth century B.C. to present day. The variation of peak currents with the time of corrosion can be fitted to the same potential rate law as that found by Reich (α = 0.070 ± 0.005), using measurements on the Meissner fraction in the superconducting state of lead. The proposed electrochemical methodology enables the dating of archeological lead artifacts with a time-dependent uncertainty estimated to be ±150 years for the most ancient samples in this study. © 2011 American Chemical Society.


Domenech-Carbo A.,University of Valencia | Domenech-Carbo M.T.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Peiro-Ronda M. A.,Museu de Prehistoria de Valencia
Electroanalysis | Year: 2011

Voltammetry of microparticles is applied to the identification of lead corrosion products by means of an essentially non-invasive 'one-touch' technique based on the use of graphite pencil. This methodology permits the mechanical attachment of few nanograms of sample from the surface of lead archaeological artefacts to a paraffin-impregnated graphite electrode, which, upon immersion in aqueous electrolytes, provides distinctive voltammetric responses for litharge and cotunnite- anglesite-, cerusite-based corrosion products. The reported method is applied to the identification of corrosion products in archaeological lead pieces from different Iberian sites in Valencia (Spain). © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Domenech A.,University of Valencia | Domenech-Carbo M.T.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Pasies T.,Museu de Prehistoria de Valencia | Bouzas M.C.,Museu de Prehistoria de Valencia
Electroanalysis | Year: 2011

An operational modification of Tafel analysis, applied to the intermediate region of square wave voltammetric curves, devoted to the identification of corrosion products on archaeological metal, is described. This is based on the voltammetry of microparticles methodology using conventional abrasive conditioning of the electrode, as well as 'one-touch' and layer-by-layer techniques. The proposed methodology is applied to the identification of copper and silver corrosion products in mediaeval silver-copper coins from the Libertad street hoard in Valencia (Spain). © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Salazar-Garcia D.C.,Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology | Salazar-Garcia D.C.,University of Valencia | Power R.C.,Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology | Sanchis Serra A.,Museu de Prehistoria de Valencia | And 3 more authors.
Quaternary International | Year: 2013

During recent decades, Neanderthal diet has been a major research topic in palaeoanthropology. This has been accelerated by the maturation of different techniques, which have produced a plethora of new information. However, this proliferation of data has led to confusing and contradictory results. Furthermore, most of the ecological dietary studies have been carried out on specimens drawn from different time periods and regions, almost exclusively those characterized by cold, open environmental conditions. Subsistence models based on these fragmentary data have been applied to Neanderthals living in a variety of different regions and environments, even though their dietary strategies may have been as variable as regions they inhabited. In this paper we integrate different dietary approaches (studies of the zooarchaeology, stable isotopes and plant remains) from the central and southeastern Mediterranean coast of Iberia in order to develop a broader and more complex picture of Neanderthal diet in different Mediterranean environmental conditions. Our results suggest that there may have been some minor dietary variation due to climatic or environmental differences, but that Neanderthal diet focussed on large terrestrial game, supplemented by plant foods when these were available. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.

Loading Museu de Prehistoria de Valencia collaborators
Loading Museu de Prehistoria de Valencia collaborators