Musculoskeletal Unit

Leuven, Belgium

Musculoskeletal Unit

Leuven, Belgium
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NEW YORK and MELBOURNE, Australia, Aug. 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Mesoblast Limited (Nasdaq:MESO) (ASX:MSB) today announced that the Phase 2a trial of its Mesenchymal Precursor Cells (MPCs) for prevention of radiographic and clinical features of knee osteoarthritis after traumatic injury has been published in the peer-reviewed journal Arthritis Research & Therapy. The results showed that a single intra-articular injection of Mesoblast’s product candidate MPC-75-IA reduced cartilage loss and bone changes by six months, and improved pain and function for over two years, when compared to controls. The paper, entitled ‘Safety, tolerability, clinical and joint structural outcomes of a single intra-articular injection of allogeneic mesenchymal precursor cells in patients post anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a controlled double-blind randomized trial’, concluded that MPCs may modulate the inflammation-related pathological processes that are associated with post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis. The trial's senior author, Professor Flavia Cicuttini, Head Musculoskeletal Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at Monash University, Australia, said: “As there are no treatments that slow progression of osteoarthritis, these results are very exciting for a population who are at high risk of developing this crippling condition.” “In this study we found that a single injection of 75 million mesenchymal precursor cells was well tolerated and appeared to slow the onset of a number of the early changes at the knee that are common following knee injury and signify the development of knee osteoarthritis. Larger studies are warranted to confirm whether this treatment will slow or even prevent the development of knee osteoarthritis following early joint injuries,” stated Professor Cicuttini. About Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common and debilitating disease that affects approximately 27 million people in the United States4.  Post-traumatic OA of the knee, hip and ankle accounts for approximately 5.6 million cases of OA in the United States4. There are approximately 250,000 cases of ACL tears annually in the USA, more than 70% of ACL reconstructions occur in patients under the age of 65 years4,5. Despite corrective ACL surgery, as many as 80% of knees post-ACL injury will progress to radiographic and symptomatic OA after 5 to 15 years6. Similar outcomes are seen with the approximately 1 million meniscal reconstruction procedures performed annually in the United States7. While existing treatments for post-traumatic OA predominantly focus on reducing pain and inflammation, none have been shown to restore joint structural changes or delay the onset and/or progression of OA. ACL reconstruction is considered to be a cost-effective treatment strategy, however in the United States there is still a significant annual cost of about $2.8 billion attributable to the long-term development of OA8. An innovative therapy that demonstrates disease modifying effects on OA development or progression would be expected to deliver significant annual societal cost savings. 1 https://www.cdc.gov/injury/erpo/icrc/2009/1-r49-ce001495-01.html 2 Arthritis & Rheumatology; Early Knee Osteoarthritis Is Evident One Year Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation; Adam G. Gulvenor, et al; April 2015 3 American Journal of Sports Medicine; The long-term consequence of anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus injuries;35:1756–69, Lohmander LS, Englund PM, Dahl LL, Roos EM.; 2007 4 Thomas A, Hubbard-Turner T, Wikstrom E (2017) Epidemiology of Psttraumatic Osteoarthritis. Journal of Athletic Training 52(6): 491-496 5 Abrams G, Frank R, Gupta A (2013) Trends in Meniscus Repair and Meniscectomy in the United States, 2005-2011. The American Journal of Sports Medicine: 1-7 6 Simon D, Mascarenhas R, Saltzman B (2015) The Relationship between Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury and Osteoarthritis of the Knee. Advances in Orthopedics: 1-12 7 Verdonk R, Verdonk P, Huysse W (2011) Tissue in­ Growth After Implantation of a Novel, Biodegradable Polyurethane Scaf­fold for Treatment of Partial Meniscal Lesions. The American Journal of Sports Medicine: 39:774-782 8 Mather R, Koenig L, Kocher M (2013) Societal and Economic Impact of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears. The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery: 95:1751-9 About Mesoblast Mesoblast Limited (Nasdaq:MESO) (ASX:MSB) is a global leader in developing innovative cell-based medicines. The Company has leveraged its proprietary technology platform, which is based on specialized cells known as mesenchymal lineage adult stem cells, to establish a broad portfolio of late-stage product candidates. Mesoblast’s allogeneic, ‘off-the-shelf’ cell product candidates target advanced stages of diseases with high, unmet medical needs including cardiovascular conditions, orthopedic disorders, immunologic and inflammatory disorders and oncologic/hematologic conditions. For more information, please visit www.mesoblast.com. Forward-Looking Statements This press release includes forward-looking statements that relate to future events or our future financial performance and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to differ materially from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. We make such forward-looking statements pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and other federal securities laws. Forward-looking statements should not be read as a guarantee of future performance or results, and actual results may differ from the results anticipated in these forward-looking statements, and the differences may be material and adverse. Forward- looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements about: the initiation, timing, progress and results of Mesoblast’s preclinical and clinical studies, and Mesoblast’s research and development programs; Mesoblast’s ability to advance product candidates into, enroll and successfully complete, clinical studies, including multi-national clinical trials; Mesoblast’s ability to advance its manufacturing capabilities; the timing or likelihood of regulatory filings and approvals, manufacturing activities and product marketing activities, if any; the commercialization of Mesoblast’s product candidates, if approved; regulatory or public perceptions and market acceptance surrounding the use of stem-cell based therapies; the potential for Mesoblast’s product candidates, if any are approved, to be withdrawn from the market due to patient adverse events or deaths; the potential benefits of strategic collaboration agreements and Mesoblast’s ability to enter into and maintain established strategic collaborations; Mesoblast’s ability to establish and maintain intellectual property on its product candidates and Mesoblast’s ability to successfully defend these in cases of alleged infringement; the scope of protection Mesoblast is able to establish and maintain for intellectual property rights covering its product candidates and technology; estimates of Mesoblast’s expenses, future revenues, capital requirements and its needs for additional financing; Mesoblast’s financial performance; developments relating to Mesoblast’s competitors and industry; and the pricing and reimbursement of Mesoblast’s product candidates, if approved. You should read this press release together with our risk factors, in our most recently filed reports with the SEC or on our website. Uncertainties and risks that may cause Mesoblast’s actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from those which may be expressed or implied by such statements, and accordingly, you should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. We do not undertake any obligations to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise.


Straker L.,Curtin University Australia | Campbell A.,Curtin University Australia | Coleman J.,University of Occupational and Environmental Health Japan | Ciccarelli M.,Curtin University Australia | And 2 more authors.
Ergonomics | Year: 2010

Posture and movement are thought to be important risk factors for the development of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Whole day occupational exposure assessment has typically used self-report or observation techniques, but the need for more accurate measurement is now recognised. The aim of this study was to compare the kinematic recordings of a frequently used field system (physiometer) with two laboratory-based systems (Fastrak and Peak) in vivo. Head, thorax and right arm kinematics were recorded simultaneously by the three systems whilst a subject performed 27 single and multiple plane physiological and simulated daily living task movement trials. Errors observed in the Fastrak and Peak data included gimbal lock and quadrant errors. Physiometer data errors included undervalues, overvalues and temporal errors of slow response and resonance. All three systems showed some cross talk. Agreement between the physiometer and the other systems was generally high for physiological movements (R2 > 0.8) and less for functional movements (R2 > 0.5). Statement of Relevance: The physiometer recording device can provide an indication of posture across time in the workplace; however, its accuracy is limited, particularly during functional movements. Further technology should be developed to unobtrusively capture accurate all day 3-D kinematics. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.


Astfalck R.G.,Curtin University Australia | O'Sullivan P.B.,Curtin University Australia | O'Sullivan P.B.,Telethon Institute of Child Health Research | Straker L.M.,Curtin University Australia | And 7 more authors.
Spine | Year: 2010

Study Design.: A preliminary cross-sectional comparative study of adolescents with nonspecific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP) and healthy controls. Objective.: To investigate whether differences in spinal kinematic and trunk muscle activity exist in both usual and slump sitting in adolescents with NSCLBP. Summary of Background.: Evidence suggests that low back pain commonly develops in adolescence and increases the risk for low back pain in adulthood. Sitting is an important consideration in adolescents with NSCLBP: currently there are no reports investigating their motor control strategies in sitting. Methods.: Twenty-eight adolescents (14 female) with NSCLBP and 28 matched pain-free controls were recruited from a large cohort study. Pain subjects were subclassified based on O'Sullivan's classification system. Three-dimensional lumbo-pelvic kinematic data and the activation of 3 back and 2 abdominal muscles were recorded during usual and slump sitting. The flexion-relaxation phenomenon in sitting was also investigated. Results.: Spinal posture in usual and slump sitting were similar for adolescents with and without NSCLBP. However, differences were identified in both sitting conditions when those with NSCLPB were subclassified and compared with controls. Muscle activation differences were not consistently identified, with only lower levels of internal oblique activation in usual sitting in NSCLBP compared with pain-free controls showing significance. Flexion relaxation was observed in both iliocostalis and thoracic erector spinae in the NSCLBP group but not controls. Conclusion.: This study provides preliminary results. Differences with sitting posture are only seen when adolescents with NSCLBP are classified. Trunk muscle activation is not a sensitive marker for discriminating subgroups of NSCLBP during adolescence. © 2010, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Bunzli S.,University of Melbourne | McEvoy S.,University of Limerick | Dankaerts W.,Musculoskeletal Unit | O'Sullivan P.,Curtin University Australia | O'Sullivan K.,University of Limerick
Physical Therapy | Year: 2016

Background. Cognitive functional therapy (CFT) has been shown to reduce pain and disability in people with chronic low back pain. Objectives. The purpose of this study was to investigate participants’ experience of CFT by comparing participants who reported differing levels of improvement after participation in CFT, potentially yielding insight into the implementation of this approach. Design. This was a noninterventional, cross-sectional, qualitative study with an interpretive description framework. Methods. Individuals who had participated in CFT in 2 physical therapy settings (in Ireland and Australia) were recruited through purposive sampling based on disability outcomes postintervention (n=9), and theoretical sampling (n=5). This sampling strategy was used to capture a range of participant experiences but was not used to define the final qualitative groupings. Semistructured interviews were conducted 3 to 6 months postintervention. Results. Three groups emerged from the qualitative analysis: large improvers, small improvers, and unchanged. Two themes encapsulating the key requirements in achieving a successful outcome through CFT were identified: (1) changing pain beliefs and (2) achieving independence. Changing pain beliefs to a more biopsychosocial perspective required a strong therapeutic alliance, development of body awareness, and the experience of control over pain. Independence was achieved by large improvers through newly cultivated problem-solving skills, self-efficacy, decreased fear of pain, and improved stress coping. Residual fear and poor stress coping meant that small improvers were easily distressed and lacked independence. Those who were unchanged continued to feel defined by their pain and retained a biomedical perspective. Conclusions. A successful outcome after CFT is dependent on instilling biopsychosocial pain beliefs and developing independence among participants. Small improvers may require ongoing support to maintain results. Further study is needed to elucidate the optimal approach for those who were unchanged. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

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