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Spadafranca A.,University of Milan | Martinez Conesa C.,Murcian Institute of Investigation and Agricultural Development IMIDA | Sirini S.,University of Milan | Testolin G.,University of Milan
British Journal of Nutrition | Year: 2010

Dark chocolate (DC) may be cardioprotective by antioxidant properties of flavonoids. We investigated the effect of DC (860mg polyphenols, of which 58mg epicatechin) compared with white chocolate (WC; 5mg polyphenols, undetectable epicatechin) on plasma epicatechin levels, mononuclear blood cells (MNBC) DNA damage and plasma total antioxidant activity (TAA). Twenty healthy subjects followed a balanced diet (55% of energy from carbohydrates, 30% from fat and 1g protein/kg body weight) for 4 weeks. Since the 14th day until the 27th day, they introduced daily 45g of either WC (n 10) or DC (n 10). Whole experimental period was standardised in antioxidant intake. Blood samples were collected at T0, after 2 weeks (T14), 2h and 22h after the first chocolate intake (T14+2h and T14+22h), and at 27th day, before chocolate intake (T27), 2h and 22h after (T27+2h and T27+22h). Samples, except for T14+2h and T27+2h, were fasting collected. Detectable epicatechin levels were observed exclusively 2h after DC intake (T14+2h=0362 (se 0052)mol/l and T27+2h=0369 (se 0041)mol/l); at the same times corresponded lower MNBC DNA damages (T14+2h=194 (se 34)% v. T14, P<005; T27+2h=24 (se 74)% v. T27, P<005; T14+2h v. T27+2h, P=07). Both effects were no longer evident after 22h. No effect was observed on TAA. WC did not affect any variable. DC may transiently improve DNA resistance to oxidative stress, probably for flavonoid kinetics. Copyright © The Authors 2010. Source


Jordan M.J.,Murcian Institute of Investigation and Agricultural Development IMIDA | Sanchez-Gomez P.,University of Murcia | Jimenez J.F.,University of Murcia | Quilez M.,Murcian Institute of Investigation and Agricultural Development IMIDA | Sotomayor J.A.,Murcian Institute of Investigation and Agricultural Development IMIDA
Natural Product Communications | Year: 2010

Satureja x delpozoi is a hybrid found in south-eastern Spain, in a population in which both parents S. intrincata and S. obovata are found together. This work presents for the first time the volatile profile and antioxidant activity of the essential oils of this hybrid. The volatile profile of the essential oils from S. x delpozoi underlines the hybrid character of these plants since the p-cymene, γ-terpinene, camphor and thymol concentrations in hybrid 1, and the same components, along with α-terpineol concentrations in hybrid 2, showed intermediate values with respect to the values observed in the parents. As regards the antioxidant capacity, the phenolic content of S. intrincata resulted in its essential oil having the greatest activity against the DPPH• and ABTS •+ radicals. Both hybrids showed low activity against these radicals, although S. obovata showed none. On the bases of their essential oil composition and antioxidant capacity, these results corroborate the hybrid character of these two S. x delpozoi plants. Source


Jordan M.J.,Murcian Institute of Investigation and Agricultural Development IMIDA | Monino M.I.,Murcian Institute of Investigation and Agricultural Development IMIDA | Martinez C.,Murcian Institute of Investigation and Agricultural Development IMIDA | Lafuente A.,Murcian Institute of Investigation and Agricultural Development IMIDA | Sotomayor J.A.,Murcian Institute of Investigation and Agricultural Development IMIDA
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2010

The effect of the introduction of distilled rosemary leaves into the diet of the Murciano-Granadina goat on the polyphenolic profile of the goats milk during the physiological stages of gestation and lactation was studied. The inclusion of rosemary leaves into the animal diet modified neither animal productivity (milk yield) nor milk quality. The following components were found in increased concentration (P < 0.05) in the goats milk after the introduction of rosemary leaves into their diet: flavonoids hesperidin, naringin, and genkwanin; gallic acid; and phenolic diterpenes carnosol and carnosic acid. With regard to the transfer of polyphenols to the plasma of the suckling goat kid, a statistically significant increase (P < 0.05) in rosmarinic acid, carnosic acid, and carnosol concentrations was detected. From this point of view, distillate rosemary leaves can be proposed as an ingredient in ruminant feed because they both alter neither the yield nor the quality of Murciano-Granadina goats' milk and allow for an increased concentration of polyphenolic components in the goats' milk and in the plasma of the suckling goat kid. © 2010 American Chemical Society. Source

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