Multiple Sclerosis Research Center

Sant'Antonio Abate, Italy

Multiple Sclerosis Research Center

Sant'Antonio Abate, Italy
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Battaglia M.A.,Fondazione Italiana Sclerosi Multipla | Bertolotto A.,Multiple Sclerosis Center | Del Sette M.,Neurology Unit | Ghezzi A.,Multiple Sclerosis Research Center | And 6 more authors.
Neurological Sciences | Year: 2013

Chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) has been proposed as a "congenital malformation" implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, numerous studies failed to confirm its presence in MS patients. This paper presents the rationale, design, and methodology adopted in the CoSMo study, conducted with the aim of verifying whether or not CCSVI is linked to MS. The primary endpoint of the CoSMo study is to compare the prevalence of CCSVI in patients with MS versus patients affected by other neurodegenerative diseases (OND) and healthy volunteers. CoSMo is a multicenter, blinded, prevalence study recruiting 2,000 adult subjects, involving 43 MS centers across Italy. Assessment of the presence or absence of CCSVI is performed by color-coded duplex (CCD) sonography and two out of the five criteria according to Zamboni are necessary for the diagnosis of CCSVI. Local CCD examination carried out by a certified sonologist and the central image readings performed by experts in the field are blinded. An advanced protocol is also described in this paper. The application of a rigorous methodological design will definitively confirm whether an association exists between CCSVI and MS. Should an association be observed, this study also further examines the link between CCSVI and the severity of MS. The addition of subgroups without MS and OND also provides information on whether CCSVI is specific to MS only. Results from the CoSMo study will play a crucial role in the possible studies concerning the potential treatment of CCSVI in MS. © 2013 The Author(s).


Comi G.,Vita-Salute San Raffaele University | Battaglia M.A.,Fondazione Italiana Sclerosi Multipla | Bertolotto A.,Neurology Unit 2 | Sette M.D.,Neurology Unit | And 9 more authors.
Multiple Sclerosis Journal | Year: 2013

Background: Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) has been proposed as a possible cause of multiple sclerosis (MS). Objectives: The CoSMo study evaluated the association between CCSVI and MS. Methods: The primary end-point of this multicentric, case-control study was to compare the prevalence of CCSVI between patients with MS, patients with other neurodegenerative diseases (ONDs) and healthy controls (HCs). Color-coded duplex sonography was performed by a sonologist and the images were sent to one of three central sonologists for a second reading. Agreement between local and central sonologists or, in case of disagreement, the predominant judgment among the three central readers, was required for a diagnosis of CCSVI. All readings, data collection and analysis were blinded. Results: The study involved 35 MS centers across Italy and included 1874 subjects aged 18-55. 1767 (94%) were evaluable: 1165 MS patients, 226 patients with ONDs and 376 HCs. CCSVI prevalence was 3.26%, 3.10% and 2.13% for the MS, OND and HC groups, respectively. No significant difference in CCSVI prevalence was found amongst the three cohorts (MS versus HC, OR = 1.55, 95%CI = 0.72-3.36, ρ= 0.30; OND versus HC, OR = 1.47, 95%CI = 0.53-4.11, ρ= 0.46; MS versus OND, OR = 1.05, 95%CI = 0.47-2.39, ρ = 0.99). High negative and low positive agreement was found between the local and centralized readers. Conclusions: CCSVI is not associated with MS. © 2013 The Author(s).


Yao S.Y.,Multiple Sclerosis Research Center | Ljunggren-Rose A.,Multiple Sclerosis Research Center | Chandramohan N.,Multiple Sclerosis Research Center | Whetsell W.O.,Vanderbilt University | Sriram S.,Multiple Sclerosis Research Center
Journal of Neuroimmunology | Year: 2010

There are currently four known isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Of these, neuronal NOS (nNOS) is known to be present exclusively in neurons, endothelial NOS (eNOS) in vascular endothelium, while the inducible form of NOS (iNOS) is known to be activated in oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and microglia. The fourth isoform, mitochondrial NOS (mtNOS), represents a post-translational modification of nNOS. Using western blotting and real time-PCR, we show induction and activation of nNOS following culture of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC) with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Activation of nNOS results in accumulation of peroxynitrite and tyrosine nitration of proteins in oligodendrocytes resulting in reduced cell viability. Injection of LPS in vivo into the corpus callosum of rats leads to the development of extensive demyelination of the white matter tracts. Immunostaining of regions close to the injection site shows the presence of nNOS, but not iNOS, in oligodendrocytes. Neither iNOS nor nNOS was seen in astrocytes in areas of demyelination. These studies suggest that activation of nNOS in oligodendrocytes leads to oligodendrocyte injury resulting in demyelination. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


Berkovich R.R.,Multiple Sclerosis Research Center | Totolyan N.A.,Saint Petersburg State University | Sokolov A.Y.,St. Petersburg State Medical University | Ignatov Y.D.,St. Petersburg State Medical University | Skoromets A.A.,Saint Petersburg State University
Zhurnal Nevrologii i Psihiatrii imeni S.S. Korsakova | Year: 2013

The most common clinical type of multiple sclerosis (MS), affecting up to 85% of patients living with this disease, is relapsingremitting (RRMS). Relapses are associated with significant functional impairment and decreased quality of life. Residual symptoms after MS relapses may persist and lead to sustained disability. Adequate management of MS relapses may help to shorten and lessen the symptoms and disability associated with their course. Systemic corticosteroids and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) have broad regulatory approval and remain the most established and validated treatment options for MS relapses. Recently, the direct anti-inflammatory effects and immunomodulatory activity of ACTH have been shown. Algorithms of using these medications for MS relapse treatment, data on plasmapheresis and perspectives of other therapeutic methods are reviewed.


PubMed | Multiple Sclerosis Research Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of neuroimmunology | Year: 2010

There are currently four known isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Of these, neuronal NOS (nNOS) is known to be present exclusively in neurons, endothelial NOS (eNOS) in vascular endothelium, while the inducible form of NOS (iNOS) is known to be activated in oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and microglia. The fourth isoform, mitochondrial NOS (mtNOS), represents a post-translational modification of nNOS. Using western blotting and real time-PCR, we show induction and activation of nNOS following culture of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC) with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Activation of nNOS results in accumulation of peroxynitrite and tyrosine nitration of proteins in oligodendrocytes resulting in reduced cell viability. Injection of LPS in vivo into the corpus callosum of rats leads to the development of extensive demyelination of the white matter tracts. Immunostaining of regions close to the injection site shows the presence of nNOS, but not iNOS, in oligodendrocytes. Neither iNOS nor nNOS was seen in astrocytes in areas of demyelination. These studies suggest that activation of nNOS in oligodendrocytes leads to oligodendrocyte injury resulting in demyelination.

Loading Multiple Sclerosis Research Center collaborators
Loading Multiple Sclerosis Research Center collaborators