MTA CSFK GGI Kovesligethy Rado Seismological Observatory

Budapest, Hungary

MTA CSFK GGI Kovesligethy Rado Seismological Observatory

Budapest, Hungary
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Szanyi G.,MTA CSFK GGI Kovesligethy Rado Seismological Observatory | Graczer Z.,MTA CSFK GGI Kovesligethy Rado Seismological Observatory | Gyori E.,MTA CSFK GGI Kovesligethy Rado Seismological Observatory | Kalab Z.,Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic | Lednicka M.,Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic
Pure and Applied Geophysics | Year: 2016

Loess high banks along the right side of the Danube in Hungary are potential subjects of landslides. Small scale ambient seismic noise tomography was used at the Dunaszekcső high bank. The aim of the study was to map near surface velocity anomalies since we assume that the formation of tension cracks—which precede landslides—are represented by low velocities. Mapping Rayleigh wave group velocity distribution can help to image intact and creviced areas and identify the most vulnerable sections. The study area lies at the top of the Castle Hill of Dunaszekcső, which was named after Castellum Lugio, a fortress of Roman origin. The presently active head scarp was formed in April 2011, and our study area was chosen to be at its surroundings. Cross-correlation functions of ambient noise recordings were used to retrieve the dispersion curves, which served as the input of the group velocity tomography. Phase cross-correlation and time-frequency phase weighted stacking was applied to calculate the cross-correlation functions. The average Rayleigh wave group velocity at the loess high bank was found to be 171 ms- 1. The group velocity map at a 0.1 s period revealed a low-velocity region, whose location coincides with a highly creviced area, where slope failure takes place along a several meter wide territory. Another low velocity region was found, which might indicate a previously unknown loosened domain. The highest velocities were observed at the supposed remnants of Castellum Lugio. © 2016, Springer International Publishing.


Kiszely M.,MTA CSFK GGI Kovesligethy Rado Seismological Observatory | Gyori E.,MTA CSFK GGI Kovesligethy Rado Seismological Observatory
Acta Geodaetica et Geophysica | Year: 2015

The Vértes Hills are one of the most active seismic regions in Hungary. An (Formula Presented.) magnitude earthquake shocked this area near to Oroszlány on January 29, 2011. The mainshock was followed by about four hundred aftershocks, and their magnitude varied from (Formula Presented.) to (Formula Presented.). Despite of the large number of aftershocks, the seismotectonic interpretation is very difficult because these earthquakes occurred in the vicinity of quarries. The waveform similarity analysis was proven a successful method to separate earthquakes and explosions, and revealed plus information about the aftershock sequence. © 2014, Akadémiai Kiadó.


Gyori E.,MTA CSFK GGI Kovesligethy Rado Seismological Observatory | Toth L.,MTA CSFK GGI Kovesligethy Rado Seismological Observatory | Monus P.,MTA CSFK GGI Kovesligethy Rado Seismological Observatory
Acta Geodaetica et Geophysica | Year: 2015

Soil liquefaction have been observed and documented at least eight times during moderate to larger magnitude historical and recent earthquakes in Hungary. Surface manifestations of liquefaction were reported from Komárom (1763, 1783, 1822), Mór (1810), Érmellék (1829, 1834), Kecskemét (1911) and Dunaharaszti (1956) earthquakes. In the study, we give a brief description of these earthquakes and make available reports that demonstrate the occurrence of soil liquefaction. Where available, we describe local subsoil conditions and information regarding ground water level. Distribution of horizontal ground accelerations possibly caused by these historical earthquakes has been modelled by ShakeMap program. Simulations indicate horizontal PGA of 0.2–0.3 g in areas where liquefaction occurred. © 2014, Akadémiai Kiadó.

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