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Kiszely M.,MTA CSFK GGI Kovesligethy Rado Seismological Observatory | Gyori E.,MTA CSFK GGI Kovesligethy Rado Seismological Observatory
Acta Geodaetica et Geophysica | Year: 2015

The Vértes Hills are one of the most active seismic regions in Hungary. An (Formula Presented.) magnitude earthquake shocked this area near to Oroszlány on January 29, 2011. The mainshock was followed by about four hundred aftershocks, and their magnitude varied from (Formula Presented.) to (Formula Presented.). Despite of the large number of aftershocks, the seismotectonic interpretation is very difficult because these earthquakes occurred in the vicinity of quarries. The waveform similarity analysis was proven a successful method to separate earthquakes and explosions, and revealed plus information about the aftershock sequence. © 2014, Akadémiai Kiadó.


Gyori E.,MTA CSFK GGI Kovesligethy Rado Seismological Observatory | Toth L.,MTA CSFK GGI Kovesligethy Rado Seismological Observatory | Monus P.,MTA CSFK GGI Kovesligethy Rado Seismological Observatory
Acta Geodaetica et Geophysica | Year: 2015

Soil liquefaction have been observed and documented at least eight times during moderate to larger magnitude historical and recent earthquakes in Hungary. Surface manifestations of liquefaction were reported from Komárom (1763, 1783, 1822), Mór (1810), Érmellék (1829, 1834), Kecskemét (1911) and Dunaharaszti (1956) earthquakes. In the study, we give a brief description of these earthquakes and make available reports that demonstrate the occurrence of soil liquefaction. Where available, we describe local subsoil conditions and information regarding ground water level. Distribution of horizontal ground accelerations possibly caused by these historical earthquakes has been modelled by ShakeMap program. Simulations indicate horizontal PGA of 0.2–0.3 g in areas where liquefaction occurred. © 2014, Akadémiai Kiadó.

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