MSU GEF International Medical School

Bangalore, India

MSU GEF International Medical School

Bangalore, India
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Rohini K.,AIMST University | Bhat S.,MSU GEF International Medical School | Srikumar P.S.,AIMST University | Mahesh Kumar A.,Madras Medical Mission Hospital
Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry | Year: 2015

The present study was aimed at assessing alterations in serum PCT in terms of its relation to body weight gain in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients undergoing treatment. Among patients (25–75 years) diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis, those that were new smear positive, showed sputum conversion at the end of 2 months and were declared clinically cured at the end of 6 months, were included in the study (n = 40). Serum procalcitonin was determined by BRAHMS PCT-Q kit. Patients were divided into two study groups—Group 1 (n = 21; serum PCT > 2 ng/ml at diagnosis), Group 2 (n = 19; serum PCT > 10 ng/ml at diagnosis). Body weights of all patients were obtained at three different time points, PTB-0 (at diagnosis), PTB-2 (after 2 months of intensive treatment) and PTB-6 (after 6 months of treatment). In both groups, mean body weights at PTB-2 and PTB-6 were significantly higher than those at PTB-0 and at PTB-6 were significantly higher than those at PTB-2. However, percentage body weight gain following 2 months of intensive treatment was higher in group 1 (4.05 % gain, p < 0.01) than in group 2 (2.75 % body weight gain, p < 0.05). Thus, the percentage gain in group 1 was tending more towards the desirable minimum gain of 5 % during intensive phase. Increase in serum PCT levels in pulmonary tuberculosis is inversely associated with body weight gain during treatment. Thus, PCT could play a role in regulation of body weight gain in anorectic conditions like tuberculosis. © 2014, Association of Clinical Biochemists of India.


Veigas N.M.,MSU GEF International Medical School | Dharmalingam M.,MSU GEF International Medical School | Marcus S.R.,MSU GEF International Medical School
Journal of Medical Biochemistry | Year: 2011

Oxidative stress is associated with the individual components of metabolic syndrome and has been implicated in the development of complications of these metabolic disorders. In this study oxidative stress levels have been compared in obese Indians (a high-risk population for diabetes and cardiovascular disorders) with and without metabolic syndrome. 30 adult normotensive, normoglycemic obese subjects and 35 adults with metabolic syndrome of either sex with BMI >23 kg/m2 were compared with 30 adult, healthy volunteers with BMI <23 kg/m2. Anthropometric parameters, blood pressure, biochemical parameters, hydroperoxides levels and total antioxidant capacity were estimated. The obese groups with and without metabolic syndrome had significantly increased anthropometric parameters like waist circumference and index of central obesity and aqueous phase hydroperoxides when compared with normal controls. The metabolic syndrome group also had significantly increased blood sugar levels, lipid profile and hydroperoxide levels when compared to obese or control groups. There was no alteration in the total antioxidant capacity in any of the groups. The Triglyceride/HDL-Cholesterol ratio (>3), a surrogate marker of insulin resistance, indicates insulin resistance in the metabolic syndrome group. The anthropometric profile, insulin resistance and oxidative stress seen in obesity are further elaborated in metabolic syndrome. Thus, the early identification of high-risk individuals based on anthropometric parameters, lipid profile, insulin resistance and indices of oxidative stress may help to prevent the development of complications of metabolic syndrome.


Shivakumar N.,Ms Ramaiah Medical College | Kumar M.,Ms Ramaiah Medical College | Aswathanarayan M.,Ms Ramaiah Medical College | Venkatesh M.,Ms Ramaiah Medical College | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Medical Biochemistry | Year: 2012

Retinol-binding protein 4 is an adipocytokine separately implicated in the development of obesity-related insulin resistance and proatherogenic lipid profile, however, its role in humans is unclear. This study was carried out to assess the role of retinol-binding protein 4 as a potential marker of metabolic syndrome in obese Asian Indians (a high-risk population for diabetes). 52 obese (BMI >23 kg/m 2) Asian Indians were grouped into those with and without metabolic syndrome based on IDF criteria and compared with healthy controls. The anthropometric and biochemical parameters (fasting blood sugar, lipid profile, serum insulin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and retinol-binding protein 4) were estimated. The obese groups had significantly altered adiposity indices, insulin resistance parameters (fasting blood sugar (only in the metabolic syndrome group), serum insulin, HOMA-IR and QUICKI), index of inflammation (C-reactive protein) and proatherogenic dyslipidemic profile (serum triglycerides, VLDL-cholesterol, and triglyceride/HDL-cholesterol ratio). Retinol-binding protein 4 levels were elevated in the obese groups, but were not significant. Retinol-binding protein 4 levels were correlated with anthro-pometric parameters and atherogenic lipids, while C-reactive protein was correlated with anthropometric and insulin resistance parameters in the entire group of subjects. Although these correlations were not observed in the obese groups, in the control group, retinol-binding protein 4 was correlated to the lipid parameters and C-reactive protein to adiposity indices. Thus, the role of retinol-binding protein 4 as a potential marker of metabolic syndrome is limited to the prediction of proatherogenic risk among Asian Indians.


PubMed | MSU GEF International Medical School, Madras Medical Mission Hospital and AIMST University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Indian journal of clinical biochemistry : IJCB | Year: 2015

The present study was aimed at assessing alterations in serum PCT in terms of its relation to body weight gain in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients undergoing treatment. Among patients (25-75years) diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis, those that were new smear positive, showed sputum conversion at the end of 2months and were declared clinically cured at the end of 6months, were included in the study (n=40). Serum procalcitonin was determined by BRAHMS PCT-Q kit. Patients were divided into two study groups-Group 1 (n=21; serum PCT>2ng/ml at diagnosis), Group 2 (n=19; serum PCT>10ng/ml at diagnosis). Body weights of all patients were obtained at three different time points, PTB-0 (at diagnosis), PTB-2 (after 2months of intensive treatment) and PTB-6 (after 6months of treatment). In both groups, mean body weights at PTB-2 and PTB-6 were significantly higher than those at PTB-0 and at PTB-6 were significantly higher than those at PTB-2. However, percentage body weight gain following 2months of intensive treatment was higher in group 1 (4.05% gain, p<0.01) than in group 2 (2.75% body weight gain, p<0.05). Thus, the percentage gain in group 1 was tending more towards the desirable minimum gain of 5% during intensive phase. Increase in serum PCT levels in pulmonary tuberculosis is inversely associated with body weight gain during treatment. Thus, PCT could play a role in regulation of body weight gain in anorectic conditions like tuberculosis.


PubMed | MSU GEF International Medical School
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Indian journal of pathology & microbiology | Year: 2012

Adrenal myelolipoma (AML) is a rare benign tumor composed of mature adipose and hematopoietic tissue. Most of these patients are asymptomatic and the tumors are non-secreting. We present a case with a large functional adrenal myelolipoma, wherein the patient was hypertensive and biochemistry revealed increase in 24 hours urinary Vanillylmandelic Acid (VMA), a metabolite of catecholamine. The mass was removed surgically and diagnosed as adrenal myelolipoma on histopathological examination. Both his blood pressure and urinary VMA returned to normal following surgery, which suggested that the mass was functioning and was secreting catecholamine. To the best of our knowledge, a catecholamine secreting adrenal myelolipoma has been reported in the literature only once previously. The association of hypertension and adrenal myelolipoma may not be entirely coincidental, as it may be associated with secreting catecholamine, as seen in our case. We also review the literature on functioning adrenal myelolipoma.


PubMed | University of the West Indies, MSU GEF International Medical School and Manipal Life Science Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Cognitive neurodynamics | Year: 2015

In chronic renal failure there is a gradual retention of substances in the tissues and body fluids, called as uremic retention toxins, which can bring about a number of biochemical activities in the body. Chronic renal insufficiency also leads to progressive behavioural conflict. Uremic toxins can affect both the central and the peripheral nervous system. Uremic encephalopathy is also associated with problems in cognition and memory. To study the psychomotor functional disorders in rats with progressive chronic renal failure surgical nephrectomy was done by resection method. The animals were grouped into two control groups, Sham control (SC) and normal control (NC) and two uremic groups, moderate uremia (GM) and severe uremia (GS). Psychomotor analysis was done by passive avoidance and open field in these animals at 4, 8, 12, and 16weeks. After the incubation period, the nephrectomised groups (GM and GS) showed significant changes in exploratory, locomotor and emotional behaviour when compared to the controls (NC and SC). Psychomotor changes involve poor cognition, reduced memory, reduced locomotor activity and decreased exploratory drive and emotional disturbance like increased fear during the initial stages. During the later stages a restless behaviour was noticed, associated with diminished fear.

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