MSU
Russia
MSU
Russia

Time filter

Source Type

Planner’s flyer gets misinterpreted as a university recommendation; would thwart new wind farms Recently Michigan State University’s (MSU) Extension in Manistee, Mich., published a pamphlet proposing an updated “sample zoning ordinance” for wind energy systems. The proposals were developed without input from the wind energy industry, or the larger group of stakeholders that worked on the state’s sample zoning ordinance in 2008. According to the principal author of the pamphlet, Kurt Schindler, his writings were intended as a discussion “starting point;” the points he raised should not be interpreted as recommendations; and in any case, are not standards endorsed by Michigan State University. In fact, the pamphlet has now been removed from the MSU Extension’s website and is not available through MSU. Despite the lack of review and the pamphlet’s removal, it is still being used by some as an example of supposedly necessary planning standards. The simple fact that MSU is no longer publicizing the pamphlet should be enough to demonstrate that its content requires a cautious eye. From the standpoint of wind energy developers, the pamphlet contains provisions that – if taken at face value – would be wholly unworkable for businesses, and are not necessary to protect public health or safety. We believe that some of these provisions, if ever implemented, could needlessly deprive rural communities of the jobs and economic activity that come with wind farms. Yet they are being presented by some lawmakers and local planners as MSU-sponsored guidelines or recommendations for wind energy zoning. That is simply not the case. In a phone conversation on April 14, 2017, the principal author, Kurt Schindler, described the work as a flyer and made it clear that the sample ordinance it contains was intended for discussion, stating: “Nobody should characterize the flyer as ‘making recommendations.’ These are meant as a discussion point and are not standards endorsed by MSU.” Here’s the reality: Hundreds of thousands of people live and work near wind farms around the world without issue. Over 20 peer-reviewed studies have found no evidence of harm from proximity to wind turbines. Credible research from MIT, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, and Canada’s equivalent of the Department of Health and Human Services bears this out. That’s not to say that the wind industry or planners shouldn’t work closely with the communities that host wind farms, and indeed they do. It does suggest, however, that some of the more drastically restrictive suggestions in the flyer could unnecessarily impede an industry that offers communities welcome economic growth and investment, as well as cleaner air. Setback requirements, as the flyer correctly points out, are designed to protect a wind turbine’s neighbors in the extremely rare event of a tower failure, and ice shedding from a blade. The author states that a setback equal to the tower’s height “should be adequate.”  And, in fact, that is about the range of values (combined with other reasonable siting standards) we have seen successfully implemented across the industry, which have proven adequate for protection of the public while also facilitating wind farms. However, some have suggested that this sample ordinance suggests a 2,500-foot property line setback.  Mr. Schindler does not agree with this characterization. He describes the concept presented in the pamphlet as a “boundary unit” that would encompass all properties receiving compensation in some form from the wind project. Since today’s wind turbines are typically around 500 feet tall,  attempting to create actual setback limitations based on the boundary unit structure would result in setbacks 4.5 times the distance that the flyer says “should be adequate.” The boundary unit the pamphlet describes is – importantly – not a health or safety related setback. It is based on the “compensation unit” concept, related to landowners receiving royalty payments, and the “observed distance shadow flicker has an impact” (although the article gives no reference for the nature of the impact or how that was established). Here are some important points to keep in mind about any setback recommendations: Wind energy projects across the country have successfully operated using some combination of a reasonable shadow flicker threshold and/or a complaint resolution process, which would allow for additional mitigation if needed. There is no evidence that setbacks based on this pamphlet’s boundary unit concept would actually be necessary to minimize or avoid what is already a virtually non-existent level of shadow flicker impact at the property line. As the author told me on the phone, “The sample ordinance does not suggest 2,500-foot setbacks. Anyone using this paper to justify a claim that setbacks should be 2,500 feet as a general matter is inappropriate.” The flyer goes on to suggest a 5,400-foot setback (or 20 times the rotor diameter) from structures designed for human occupancy, or that turbines be turned off when such a structure experiences shadow flicker. Much like the setbacks for property lines, such ideas if they were ever applied would greatly and unnecessarily restrict turbine placement or operation. They would significantly impede the property rights of landowners who may want to host wind turbines, even though there is no public safety reason to justify it. Shadow flicker becomes unimportant at distances far shorter than 5,400 feet, and as noted is rare to start with and can be mitigated. Again, a combination of a reasonable shadow flicker threshold and/or a complaint resolution process has proven adequate for wind farms across the county. The flyer suggests a sound limit of 40 decibels at the property line. Such a blanket standard would be among the most restrictive in the country, and unnecessarily restrict the development of wind farms. Points to keep in mind: AWEA and its member companies have been involved in a number of model ordinance exercises across the country. In such exercises, it’s important to rigorously and fairly discuss the issues around adding more wind energy to our nation’s energy mix. Any sample ordinances should come out of multi-stakeholder processes that include third party consultants and experts, community members and industry representatives. The goal is to evaluate potential impacts and benefits, and other considerations. This pamphlet seems to be based on a input from a limited number of stakeholders and no discussion of the issues, challenges and solutions. It is also important to note that its contents do not change the Michigan Agency for Energy’s existing sample ordinance, and have not been endorsed by other experts in the field. The concepts related to setbacks and sound are far more restrictive than what has been implemented in communities across the country, and would effectively “zone out” wind farms in most communities if ever adopted. While no form of land use or energy production is completely free of impacts, wind energy’s impacts are extremely low and quite manageable. We urge planners to consider all the facts related to impacts and benefits before making decisions, and to recognize that the standards suggested by this flyer would be extremely cautious to the point of making future wind energy development all but impossible. Mike Speerscheider, AWEA’s Senior Director for Permitting Policy & Environmental Affairs, contributed to this post.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

EAST LANSING, Mich. - For the best chance of getting hired, former inmates should apologize for their criminal past to potential employers, indicates new research that comes amid the nationwide "ban-the-box" movement. Trying to justify the crime can be an iffy strategy. And making an excuse is probably the worst thing an ex-offender can do to try to gain a would-be employer's trust, said Michigan State University's Abdifatah Ali, lead author of the study, which appears in the Journal of Applied Psychology. An estimated 70 million people in the United States - nearly 1 in 3 adults - have a prior arrest or conviction record. "Apologizing for your past criminal offense seems to be the most effective strategy in reducing concerns about your underlying trustworthiness as a person of integrity," said Abdifatah, a doctoral student in psychology. He co-authored the study with Ann Marie Ryan, an MSU psychology professor who has investigated discrimination against various groups of job-seekers including women, military veterans and people with disabilities. More than 25 states, as well as some 150 cities and counties, have banned the criminal history check box on job applications, delaying those questions until later in the hiring process - usually the interview - and potentially giving the candidate a better chance at employment, according to the National Employment Law Project. But lawmakers in some areas of the country, including Indiana and Texas, are fighting these ban-the-box efforts. And even though ban-the-box may increase the likelihood of those with criminal records making it past the application stage, they still likely will be asked about prior offenses. Abdifatah came up with the idea for the study while working with job candidates in Michigan who couldn't get a job because of their criminal history, even though their crimes had often occurred 10 or even 20 years prior. The state of Michigan does not have a ban-the-box law. "The core issue that we were trying to address from a psychological perspective is how applicants with a criminal record can best present information regarding their offense," said Abdifatah. "From a counseling standpoint there aren't any evidence-based strategies of how to best present themselves in those situations." The research involved three studies in which more than 500 participants evaluated job applications or watched a video of job interviews. Job applicants gave one of three responses to their criminal past: Excuse (e.g., "I was convicted of aggravated assault. I was not responsible for the incident because I was at the wrong place at the wrong time"). Justification (e.g., "I was convicted of aggravated assault. I accept responsibility because I should have not been involved, but I got involved because I was trying to help a family member"). Apology (e.g., "I was convicted of aggravated assault. I should not have been involved and I understand what I did caused harm. I apologized and promised it would never happen again"). Across all three studies, providing an apology was the most successful strategy in leading evaluators to perceive the candidate as remorseful and less likely to engage in deviant behaviors at work. Justification could also be successful, although less so, Abdifatah said. Making an excuse, on the other hand, had a negative effect on hiring decisions because it failed to lessen the threat associated with criminal identity. Also co-authoring the study was Brent Lyons, a former MSU doctoral student who's now an assistant professor at Simon Fraser University in Canada.


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Michigan State University researchers have shown that sunflower seeds are frequently contaminated with a toxin produced by molds and pose an increased health risk in many low-income countries worldwide. In the current issue of PLoS ONE, the team of scientists documented frequent occurrence of aflatoxin – a toxin produced by Aspergillus molds that commonly infect corn, peanuts, pistachios and almonds – in sunflower seeds and their products. This is one of the first studies to associate aflatoxin contamination with sunflower seeds. The study was conducted in Tanzania, but the problem is by no means isolated there. Chronic exposure to aflatoxin causes an estimated 25,000 to 155,000 deaths worldwide each year, from corn and peanuts alone. Since it is one of the most potent liver carcinogens known, the research to detect and limit its presence in sunflower seeds and their products could help save lives and reduce liver disease in areas where sunflowers and their byproducts are consumed, said Gale Strasburg, MSU food science and human nutrition professor and one of the study’s co-authors. “These high aflatoxin levels, in a commodity frequently consumed by the Tanzanian population, indicate that local authorities must implement interventions to prevent and control aflatoxin contamination along the sunflower commodity value chain, to enhance food and feed safety in Tanzania,” he said. “Follow-up research is needed to determine intake rates of sunflower seed products in humans and animals, to inform exposure assessments and to better understand the role of sunflower seeds and cakes as a dietary aflatoxin source.” Smallholder farmers in Tanzania grow sunflowers for the seeds, which are sold to local millers who press the seeds for oil and sell it to local consumers for cooking. The remaining cakes are used as animal feed. The seeds become infected by Aspergillus flavus or Aspergillus parasiticus, molds that produce aflatoxin. This contamination has been well studied in other crops, but there is little research published on sunflower seed contamination. Juma Mmongoyo, a former MSU food science doctoral student and lead author of the study, analyzed aflatoxin levels of seeds and cakes in seven regions of Tanzania in 2014 and 2015. Nearly 60 percent of seed samples and 80 percent of cake samples were contaminated with aflatoxins. In addition, 14 percent of seeds and 17 percent of cakes were contaminated above 20 parts per billion, the level considered safe by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Some samples had levels of several hundred parts per billion. “Billions of people worldwide are exposed to aflatoxin in their diets, particularly in places where food is not monitored regularly for contaminants,” said Felicia Wu, the Hannah Distinguished Professor of Food Science and Human Nutrition and Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics at MSU and study co-author. “Our previous work with the World Health Organization on the global burden of foodborne disease showed that aflatoxin is one of the chemical contaminants that causes the greatest disease burden worldwide.” To help solve that problem, Wu founded the Center for the Health Impacts of Agriculture. The center tackles global issues, such as antibiotics given to livestock and poultry that seep into soil and nearby bodies of water, and the association between malaria incidence and irrigation patterns in sub-Saharan Africa. MSU scientists John Linz,Muraleedharan Nair and Robert Tempelman contributed to this study. Jovin Mugula of the Sokoine University of Agriculture (Tanzania) also contributed to this research.


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Michigan State University researchers have shown that sunflower seeds are frequently contaminated with a toxin produced by molds and pose an increased health risk in many low-income countries worldwide. In the current issue of PLoS ONE, the team of scientists documented frequent occurrence of aflatoxin – a toxin produced by Aspergillus molds that commonly infect corn, peanuts, pistachios and almonds – in sunflower seeds and their products. This is one of the first studies to associate aflatoxin contamination with sunflower seeds. The study was conducted in Tanzania, but the problem is by no means isolated there. Chronic exposure to aflatoxin causes an estimated 25,000 to 155,000 deaths worldwide each year, from corn and peanuts alone. Since it is one of the most potent liver carcinogens known, the research to detect and limit its presence in sunflower seeds and their products could help save lives and reduce liver disease in areas where sunflowers and their byproducts are consumed, said Gale Strasburg, MSU food science and human nutrition professor and one of the study’s co-authors. “These high aflatoxin levels, in a commodity frequently consumed by the Tanzanian population, indicate that local authorities must implement interventions to prevent and control aflatoxin contamination along the sunflower commodity value chain, to enhance food and feed safety in Tanzania,” he said. “Follow-up research is needed to determine intake rates of sunflower seed products in humans and animals, to inform exposure assessments and to better understand the role of sunflower seeds and cakes as a dietary aflatoxin source.” Smallholder farmers in Tanzania grow sunflowers for the seeds, which are sold to local millers who press the seeds for oil and sell it to local consumers for cooking. The remaining cakes are used as animal feed. The seeds become infected by Aspergillus flavus or Aspergillus parasiticus, molds that produce aflatoxin. This contamination has been well studied in other crops, but there is little research published on sunflower seed contamination. Juma Mmongoyo, a former MSU food science doctoral student and lead author of the study, analyzed aflatoxin levels of seeds and cakes in seven regions of Tanzania in 2014 and 2015. Nearly 60 percent of seed samples and 80 percent of cake samples were contaminated with aflatoxins. In addition, 14 percent of seeds and 17 percent of cakes were contaminated above 20 parts per billion, the level considered safe by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Some samples had levels of several hundred parts per billion. “Billions of people worldwide are exposed to aflatoxin in their diets, particularly in places where food is not monitored regularly for contaminants,” said Felicia Wu, the Hannah Distinguished Professor of Food Science and Human Nutrition and Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics at MSU and study co-author. “Our previous work with the World Health Organization on the global burden of foodborne disease showed that aflatoxin is one of the chemical contaminants that causes the greatest disease burden worldwide.” To help solve that problem, Wu founded the Center for the Health Impacts of Agriculture. The center tackles global issues, such as antibiotics given to livestock and poultry that seep into soil and nearby bodies of water, and the association between malaria incidence and irrigation patterns in sub-Saharan Africa. MSU scientists John Linz,Muraleedharan Nair and Robert Tempelman contributed to this study. Jovin Mugula of the Sokoine University of Agriculture (Tanzania) also contributed to this research.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

EAST LANSING, Mich. - Maintaining the yards of vacant properties helps reduce crime rates in urban neighborhoods, indicates a new Michigan State University study that's the most comprehensive to date. The study, published online in the journal Applied Geography, overlaid nine years of crime statistics in Flint, Michigan, with data from a greening program where thousands of abandoned lots in various neighborhoods were regularly mowed and maintained. Richard Sadler, an urban geographer and the study's lead author, assigned each neighborhood a "greening score" based on how many vacant properties in the area were being kept up. Using a method called "emerging hot spot analysis," which identifies patterns or trends of events over space and time, he applied crime data from 2005 through 2014. "Generally speaking, I found that greening was more prevalent where violent crime, property crime and victimless crime were going down," said Sadler, an assistant professor of public health in the College of Human Medicine. The premise of the study was devised when the Genesee County Land Bank Authority began its Clean and Green program 13 years ago to spruce up vacant property throughout the city. They discovered that over the years, the program seemed to produce another benefit - in neighborhoods where community groups maintained vacant lots, crime appeared to decline. "We've always had a sense that maintaining these properties helps reduce crime and the perception of crime," said Christina Kelly, the land bank's planning and neighborhood revitalization director. "So we weren't surprised to see the research back it up." Flint's population of slightly more than 100,000 is half what it was in the 1960s and the city has lost 41 percent of its jobs as the auto industry pulled out. This led to a concentration of poverty in Flint, a decrease in the number of police officers and a rise in crime to one of the highest rates in the nation. Today, more than 42 percent of the properties in Flint are either publicly owned or otherwise vacant. Sadler said investments in eliminating blight and getting community buy-in can pay off in a number of ways for urban areas across the country and be less expensive to sustain. Earlier studies have shown that greening and gardening programs in general are linked to less stress, depression and hopelessness for residents, as well as lower crime rates, including assaults, burglaries and robberies. But Sadler mentioned that an in-depth space-and-time analysis of these correlations has not been explored until now. He indicated that programs such as Clean and Green not only make the properties more attractive for development and stabilizes neighborhoods, but alert potential criminals that residents are keeping an eye on things. "It's people looking out for their own neighborhoods," he said. "If you know somebody's watching, you're not going to go out and vandalize something. It's the overall change in perception created by cleaning up blighted property." Michigan State University has been working to advance the common good in uncommon ways for more than 150 years. One of the top research universities in the world, MSU focuses its vast resources on creating solutions to some of the world's most pressing challenges, while providing life-changing opportunities to a diverse and inclusive academic community through more than 200 programs of study in 17 degree-granting colleges.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

EAST LANSING, Mich. - You don't need the charisma of Steve Jobs to be an effective boss, indicates new research led by Michigan State University business scholars. In a series of five studies, the researchers found bosses who were supportive and set clear expectations -- but weren't necessarily transformational leaders with grand visions -- were able to effectively motivate their employees. The study, published in the journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, is one of the first to examine how a leader's regulatory focus, or mindset, affects his or her own behavior and, in turn, employees' motivation. The findings suggest bosses can modify their mindset to produce a certain outcome from workers, whether that's innovation or a more conservative work focus aimed at meeting basic obligations and preventing errors, said Brent Scott, MSU professor of management and study co-author. "Effective leadership may be based in part on leader's ability to recognize when a particular mental state is needed in their employees and to adapt their own mental state and their behaviors to elicit that mindset," Scott said. "Part of the story here is that you don't have to be Steve Jobs to be an effective leader. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to managing." The research team, led by Russell Johnson, MSU associate professor of management, conducted field studies and experiments with hundreds of managers and employees from a variety of industries including professional services, manufacturing and government. Bosses who had an innovative mindset (called promotion focus) were more likely to lead in a transformative way and thus elicit an innovative mindset among employees. Bosses with a more conservative mindset (called prevention focus) were more likely to "manage by exception," which involves focusing almost exclusively on preventing mistakes, thus eliciting a prevention focus among workers. "We found that the motivations of managers are contagious and 'trickle down' to their subordinates," Johnson said. "Thus, if managers are unhappy with how their people are approaching work tasks, the managers might actually be the ones responsible for eliciting their motivation in the first place. Managers can modify their leadership behavior to trigger the appropriate motivation orientation in their employees to fit the situation." While the study identified some transformational leaders who elicited an innovative mindset among employees, Scott said it's unrealistic to think that every boss can be - or necessarily wants to be - a transformational leader all of the time. Some work situations and environments may call for a more preventative approach. A sweet spot for managing may be what's called "contingent reward behavior," which brings in both a promotion and prevention focus -- emphasizing gains and providing both positive and negative reinforcement based on performance. "The contingent approach is quid pro quo -- if you do this, I'll give you that," Scott said. "It's not sexy like transformational leadership, but it's something that just about every manager can do because it doesn't require you to ooze charisma."


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.treehugger.com

Last December, Michigan State University was faced with quite the conundrum. Freezing temperatures compromised the stores of mayonnaise for its dining services -- 500 2.5-gallon containers of the stuff. It wasn't spoiled, but it wasn't usable either. Usually when food products are not quite right, the MSU Food Stores donates them to the local food bank, but because of the lower quality and the huge amount, that wasn't an option. It was also too much mayo to just throw out and waste. Luckily, the school has sustainability officers tasked with curbing waste that came up with a great idea. The university has an anaerobic digester that helps to power farm areas and buildings on the south side of campus. The high sugar and fat in mayonnaise made it the perfect fuel for the digester, which processes thousands of tons of food waste every year. “The decision was actually fairly easy,” said MSU Culinary Services Sustainability Officer Cole Gude to The State News. “It was a perfect situation to turn what could have been a catastrophe into something positive for the university.” Over one day, a team of 12 staff members spent eight hours dumping the containers into the dumpster that held the digester's food stock. After pouring the mayo from each carton, the team had to take all of them back to a kitchen to clean the excess mayo out to get the containers ready for recycling. “Mayonnaise was getting all over, some carpet was getting smeared and we all had dress clothes on,” said Residential and Hospitality Services Sustainability officer Carla Iansiti. “This was not anticipated at all.” Though the work was messy and time-consuming, the team felt good about making something positive out of a lot of bad mayonnaise and, thanks to them, for a brief time some buildings on the south side of campus ran on mayo power.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: phys.org

Commissioned and funded by Google, William Dutton, director of MSU's James and Mary Quello Center in the College of Communication Arts and Sciences, and researchers from Oxford University and the University of Ottawa, conducted a survey of 14,000 internet users in seven nations: United States, Britain, France, Poland, Germany, Italy and Spain. "The role of search in the political arena is of particular significance as it holds the potential to support or undermine democratic processes," Dutton said. "For example, does online search enable citizens to obtain better information about candidates for political office and issues in elections and public affairs, or do the processes underlying search bias what citizens know in ways that could distort democratic choice?" While there are country-specific findings, universally, concerns about internet searches undermining the quality and diversity of information accessed by citizens are unwarranted, the study found. Indeed, search plays a role in how internet users obtain information about politics, but there are several factors that come into play, Dutton said. "The results from our study show that internet users interested in politics tend to be exposed to multiple media sources, to discover new information, to be skeptical of political information and to check information, such as that seen on social media, by using search," he said. "These findings should caution governments, business and the public from over-reacting to alarmist panics." Most research on internet searches has focused on one platform, such as Twitter or Facebook, Dutton said. The MSU study is one of the first to concentrate on the wider context of a person's informational and social networks and the wide range of media people consume. The study can be downloaded from the Social Science Research Network.


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

EAST LANSING, Mich. - Michigan State University researchers have shown that sunflower seeds are frequently contaminated with a toxin produced by molds and pose an increased health risk in many low-income countries worldwide. In the current issue of PLoS ONE, the team of scientists documented frequent occurrence of aflatoxin - a toxin produced by Aspergillus molds that commonly infect corn, peanuts, pistachios and almonds - in sunflower seeds and their products. This is one of the first studies to associate aflatoxin contamination with sunflower seeds. The study was conducted in Tanzania, but the problem is by no means isolated there. Chronic exposure to aflatoxin causes an estimated 25,000-155,000 deaths worldwide each year, from corn and peanuts alone. Since it is one of the most potent liver carcinogens known, the research to detect and limit its presence in sunflower seeds and their products could help save lives and reduce liver disease in areas where sunflowers and their byproducts are consumed, said Gale Strasburg, MSU food science and human nutrition professor and one of the study's co-authors. "These high aflatoxin levels, in a commodity frequently consumed by the Tanzanian population, indicate that local authorities must implement interventions to prevent and control aflatoxin contamination along the sunflower commodity value chain, to enhance food and feed safety in Tanzania," he said. "Follow-up research is needed to determine intake rates of sunflower seed products in humans and animals, to inform exposure assessments and to better understand the role of sunflower seeds and cakes as a dietary aflatoxin source." Smallholder farmers in Tanzania grow sunflowers for the seeds, which are sold to local millers who press the seeds for oil and sell it to local consumers for cooking. The remaining cakes are used as animal feed. The seeds become infected by Aspergillus flavus or Aspergillus parasiticus, molds that produce aflatoxin. This contamination has been well studied in other crops, but there is little research published on sunflower seed contamination. Juma Mmongoyo, a former MSU food science doctoral student and lead author of the study, analyzed aflatoxin levels of seeds and cakes in seven regions of Tanzania in 2014 and 2015. Nearly 60 percent of seed samples and 80 percent of cake samples were contaminated with aflatoxins. In addition, 14 percent of seeds and 17 percent of cakes were contaminated above 20 parts per billion, the level considered safe by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Some samples had levels of several hundred parts per billion. "Billions of people worldwide are exposed to aflatoxin in their diets, particularly in places where food is not monitored regularly for contaminants," said Felicia Wu, the Hannah Distinguished Professor of Food Science and Human Nutrition and Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics at MSU and study co-author. "Our previous work with the World Health Organization on the global burden of foodborne disease showed that aflatoxin is one of the chemical contaminants that causes the greatest disease burden worldwide." To help solve that problem, Wu founded the Center for the Health Impacts of Agriculture. The center tackles global issues, such as antibiotics given to livestock and poultry that seep into soil and nearby bodies of water, and the association between malaria incidence and irrigation patterns in sub-Saharan Africa. MSU scientists John Linz, Muraleedharan Nair and Robert Tempelman contributed to this study. Jovin Mugula of the Sokoine University of Agriculture (Tanzania) also contributed to this research. Michigan State University has been working to advance the common good in uncommon ways for more than 150 years. One of the top research universities in the world, MSU focuses its vast resources on creating solutions to some of the world's most pressing challenges, while providing life-changing opportunities to a diverse and inclusive academic community through more than 200 programs of study in 17 degree-granting colleges. For MSU news on the Web, go to MSUToday. Follow MSU News on Twitter at twitter.com/MSUnews.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Kirsch, who was named the No. 1 Most Effective Corporate Lobbyist in Michigan by MIRS News in 2015, will continue to work with AT&T, a long-time client of the firm. "Jim is a great addition to our already strong lobbying team," said Dave Ladd, a principal of the firm. "Jim knows business, political, and community leaders throughout Michigan, and that's especially important to us as we look to further expand our Detroit practice and implement our future growth plans." Kirsch also has extensive experience in the legislative arena, also having served from 1999 to 2006 in the Michigan State Senate as a Policy Analyst for the Senate Judiciary Committee, responsible for monitoring committee activity and advising Senators on legislative content. Kirsch, a native of Oak Park, is a summa cum laude graduate of Michigan State University, where he majored in Psychology and Criminal Justice. He also holds a law degree from the University of Denver College of Law in Denver, Colorado. "I'm eager to join a firm with such a strong vision and strategic direction for its future," Kirsch said. "As the political arena evolves in Lansing and beyond, I'm looking forward to creating value for the firm's clients." A veteran of the United States Navy, Kirsch served overseas as a Military Policeman, training more than 200 patrol officers and guards in all phases of required standards of duty performance. During his time in the service, Mr. Kirsch also worked as a criminal investigator who assisted the Naval Investigative Service (NIS) and the Judge Advocate General (JAG) in various law enforcement capacities. Kirsch serves on the Board of Directors for the Michigan Chamber of Commerce, and the University Club of MSU Membership Committee.  He also was the recipient of the Navy Good Conduct Medal and the National Defense Medal for his service during Operation: Desert Storm. Kirsch also appeared in the Hollywood blockbuster Batman vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice in an uncredited role when the movie was filming on the campus of Michigan State University in East Lansing. Kirsch currently resides in Holt with Angie, his wife of 20 years, and daughter Kennedy, 12. Kelley Cawthorne is consistently rated as one of Michigan's leading lobbying organizations by Inside Michigan Politics and MIRS News, as are many of its individual lobbyists. It is the only statewide lobbying firm with dedicated offices in Lansing and Detroit.  Its highly diverse lobbying team has the policy and advocacy expertise necessary to create value in the public policy arena for clients such as AT&T, The Christman Company, DTE Energy, Michigan Special Olympics, Deloitte Consulting, Ford Motors, McLaren Health Care, Wal-Mart, and Wayne State University, among others. The bi-partisan firm was co-founded by former Michigan Democratic Attorney General Frank Kelley and former Michigan Republican House Leader Dennis Cawthorne. Its current principals are Rob Elhenicky, David Gregory, Dave Ladd, and Melissa McKinley. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/kelley-cawthorne-announces-hire-of-public-affairs-veteran-jim-kirsch-as-lobbyist-300448662.html

Loading MSU collaborators
Loading MSU collaborators