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Wilson D.J.,Imperial College London | Crocket K.C.,Imperial College London | Crocket K.C.,Scottish Association for Marine Science | Van De Flierdt T.,Imperial College London | And 3 more authors.
Paleoceanography | Year: 2014

The last deglaciation was characterized by a series of millennial-scale climate events that have been linked to deep ocean variability. While often implied in interpretations, few direct constraints exist on circulation changes at mid-depths. Here we provide new constraints on the variability of deglacial mid-depth circulation using combined radiocarbon and neodymium isotopes in 24 North Atlantic deep-sea corals. Their aragonite skeletons have been dated by uranium-series, providing absolute ages and the resolution to record centennial-scale changes, while transects spanning the lifetime of a single coral allow subcentennial tracer reconstruction. Our results reveal that rapid fluctuations of water mass sourcing and radiocarbon affected the mid-depth water column (1.7-2.5 km) on timescales of less than 100 years during the latter half of Heinrich Stadial 1. The neodymium isotopic variability (-14.5 to -11.0) ranges from the composition of the modern northern-sourced waters towards more radiogenic compositions, suggesting the presence of a greater southern-sourced component at some times. However, in detail, simple two-component mixing between well-ventilated northern-sourced and radiocarbon-depleted southern-sourced water masses cannot explain all our data. Instead, corals from ∼15.0 ka and ∼15.8 ka may record variability between southern-sourced intermediate waters and radiocarbon-depleted northern-sourced waters, unless there was a major shift in the neodymium isotopic composition of the northern end-member. In order to explain the rapid shift towards the most depleted radiocarbon values at ∼15.4 ka, we suggest a different mixing scenario involving either radiocarbon-depleted deep water from the Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian Seas or a southern-sourced deep water mass. Since these mid-depth changes preceded the Bolling-Allerod warming and were apparently unaccompanied by changes in the deep Atlantic, they may indicate an important role for the intermediate ocean in the early deglacial climate evolution. ©2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.


Abbe T.,ENTRIX Inc. | Bjork J.,ENTRIX Inc. | Zehni A.,Pierce County Public Works | Park J.,MS
World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2011: Bearing Knowledge for Sustainability - Proceedings of the 2011 World Environmental and Water Resources Congress | Year: 2011

The traditional method to control river bank erosion and channel migration has been rock revetment. Although this approach can be effective, it often has negative impacts on aquatic habitat. In the Pacific Northwest billions of dollars have been spent on restoration, restrictions and spillage of water at hydropower dams to stop the decline of threatened and endangered salmon. We developed a new innovative method for bank protection which combines the habitat benefits of large woody debris and the stability and erosion resistance of concrete dolos. The first application was along the Lower Puyallup River where a complex revetment of dolos and logs was constructed in 2009 to protect a segment of the river's North Levee in the highly developed city of Fife, Washington. Regulators considered the work to be self-mitigating. The second application, now being designed, will provide 1,300 LF of protection along State Route 20 in northern Washington where the Skagit River has caused repeatedly obliteration of the highway. The project reach is a Wild and Scenic River near the North Cascade National Recreation Area, has numerous spawning redds of endangered steelhead and Chinook salmon and resource agencies would not allow further placement of a rock revetment. The dolos will be made of colored concrete and will have a roughened, bark-like surface. Connected to logs, the units can be placed with a crane or excavator without dewatering or river diversions, a substantial cost savings. The resultant is bank protection which has both a large surface area of logs and a huge volume of interstitial spaces which enhances physical complexity critical to habitat. This new approach is in the process of being patented and offers tremendous potential for more sustainable bank protection and maintenance. © 2011 ASCE.


Wiseguyreports.Com Adds “Textile Digital Printing Machine -Market Demand, Growth, Opportunities and analysis of Top Key Player Forecast to 2021” To Its Research Database This report Mainly covers the following product types,  The segment applications including Segment regions including (the separated region report can also be offered) USA China Europe South America Japan Africa The players list (Partly, Players you are interested in can also be added) MS Kornit MIMAKI Konica Minolta Ricoh HGS Machines D.GEN SPGPrints Mutoh Roland Monti Antonio BROTHER REGGIANI Zhengzhou Jinyang Digital technology Atextco Homer Tech With no less than 15 top producers. Data including (both global and regions): Market Size (both volume - K Units and value - million USD), Market Share, Production data, Consumption data, Trade data, Price - USD/Unit, Cost, Gross margin etc. 1 Industry Overview of Textile Digital Printing Machine 1.1 Definition and Specifications of Textile Digital Printing Machine 1.1.1 Definition of Textile Digital Printing Machine 1.1.2 Specifications of Textile Digital Printing Machine 1.2 Classification of Textile Digital Printing Machine 1.3 Applications of Textile Digital Printing Machine 1.4 Industry Chain Structure of Textile Digital Printing Machine 1.5 Industry Overview and Major Regions Status of Textile Digital Printing Machine 1.5.1 Industry Overview of Textile Digital Printing Machine 1.5.2 Global Major Regions Status of Textile Digital Printing Machine 1.6 Industry Policy Analysis of Textile Digital Printing Machine 1.7 Industry News Analysis of Textile Digital Printing Machine 8 Major Manufacturers Analysis of Textile Digital Printing Machine 8.1 MS 8.1.1 Company Profile 8.1.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.1.3 MS 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.1.4 MS 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.2 Kornit 8.2.1 Company Profile 8.2.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.2.3 Kornit 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.2.4 Kornit 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.3 MIMAKI 8.3.1 Company Profile 8.3.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.3.3 MIMAKI 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.3.4 MIMAKI 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.4 Konica Minolta 8.4.1 Company Profile 8.4.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.4.3 Konica Minolta 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.4.4 Konica Minolta 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.5 Ricoh 8.5.1 Company Profile 8.5.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.5.3 Ricoh 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.5.4 Ricoh 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.6 HGS Machines 8.6.1 Company Profile 8.6.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.6.3 HGS Machines 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.6.4 HGS Machines 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.7 D.GEN 8.7.1 Company Profile 8.7.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.7.3 D.GEN 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.7.4 D.GEN 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.8 SPGPrints 8.8.1 Company Profile 8.8.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.8.3 SPGPrints 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.8.4 SPGPrints 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.9 Mutoh 8.9.1 Company Profile 8.9.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.9.3 Mutoh 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.9.4 Mutoh 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.10 Roland 8.10.1 Company Profile 8.10.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.10.3 Roland 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.10.4 Roland 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.11 Monti Antonio 8.11.1 Company Profile 8.11.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.11.3 Monti Antonio 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.11.4 Monti Antonio 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.12 BROTHER 8.12.1 Company Profile 8.12.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.12.3 BROTHER 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.12.4 BROTHER 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.13 REGGIANI 8.13.1 Company Profile 8.13.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.13.3 REGGIANI 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.13.4 REGGIANI 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.14 Zhengzhou Jinyang Digital technology 8.14.1 Company Profile 8.14.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.14.3 Zhengzhou Jinyang Digital technology 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.14.4 Zhengzhou Jinyang Digital technology 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.15 Atextco 8.15.1 Company Profile 8.15.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.15.3 Atextco 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.15.4 Atextco 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.16 Homer Tech 8.16.1 Company Profile 8.16.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.16.3 Homer Tech 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.16.4 Homer Tech 2015 Textile Digital Printing Machine Business Region Distribution Analysis


Lindley R.I.,University of Sydney | Baigent C.,Professor | Chadwick D.,Professor | Lowe G.,Professor | And 8 more authors.
Stroke | Year: 2015

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE—: Our aim was to identify whether particular subgroups of patients had an unacceptably high risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage or low chance of benefit when treated with alteplase (recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator).METHODS—: Third International Stroke Trial was an international randomized trial of the intravenous (IV) recombinant plasminogen activator alteplase (0.9 mg/kg) versus control in 3035 (1515 versus 1520) patients. We analyzed the effect of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator on 6-month functional outcome, early death, and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (both ≤7 days). We tested for any differences in treatment effect between subgroups by a test of interaction. Our 13 protocol prespecified subgroups were time to randomization, age, sex, stroke subtype, atrial fibrillation, early ischemic change (clinician and expert panel), prior antiplatelet use, stroke severity, diastolic and systolic blood pressure at randomization, center’s thrombolysis experience, and trial phase. Analyses were adjusted for key baseline prognostic factors.RESULTS—: There were no significant interactions in the subgroups analyzed that were consistent across all 3 outcomes. Treatment with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator increased the odds of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage by a greater amount in patients taking prior antiplatelets than those who were not (P=0.019 for test of interaction), but had no clear detrimental effect on functional outcome at 6 months in this group (P=0.781 for test of interaction).CONCLUSIONS—: Among the types of patient in the Third International Stroke Trial, this secondary analysis did not identify any subgroups for whom treatment should be avoided. Given the limitations of the analysis, we found no clear evidence to avoid treatment in patients with prior ischemic stroke, diabetes mellitus, or hypertension.CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION—: URL: http://www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN25765518. http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN25765518. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.


Grupke S.,MS | Hall J.,MS | Dobbs M.,University of Kentucky | Bix G.J.,University of Kentucky | And 2 more authors.
Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery | Year: 2015

Background Neuroprotection for ischemic stroke is a growing field, built upon the elucidation of the biochemical pathways of ischemia first studied in the 1970s. Beginning in the early 1990s, means by which to pharmacologically intervene and counteract these pathways have been sought, though with little clinical success. Through a comprehensive review of translations from laboratory to clinic, we aim to evaluate individual mechanisms of action, while highlighting potential barriers to success that will guide future research.Methods The MEDLINE database and The Internet Stroke Center clinical trials registry were queried for trials involving the use of neuroprotective agents in acute ischemic stroke in human subjects. For the purpose of the review, neuroprotective agents refer to medications used to preserve or protect the potentially ischemic tissue after an acute stroke, excluding treatments designed to re-establish perfusion. This excludes mechanical or pharmacological thrombolytics, anti-thrombic medications, or anti-platelet therapies.Results This review summarizes previously trialed neuroprotective agents, including but not limited to glutamate neurotransmission blockers, anti-oxidants, GABA agonists, leukocyte migration blockers, various small cation channel modulators, narcotic antagonists, and phospholipid membrane stabilizers. We outline key biochemical steps in ischemic injury that are the proposed areas of intervention. The agents, time to administration of therapeutic agent, follow-up, and trial results are reported.Discussion Stroke trials in humans are burdened with a marked heterogeneity of the patient population that is not seen in animal studies. Also, trials to date have included patients that are likely treated at a time outside of the window of efficacy for neuroprotective drugs, and have not effectively combined thrombolysis with neuroprotection. Through an evaluation of the accomplishments and failures in neuroprotection research, we propose new methodologies, agents, and techniques that may provide new routes for success. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Sawers A.B.,MS | Sawers A.B.,University of Washington | Hahn M.E.,MS | Hahn M.E.,University of Washington
Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics | Year: 2010

Lower limb joint kinetics are among the most commonly reported values after instrumented gait analysis and are typically estimated via inverse dynamic calculations. These calculations require, among other things, the selection of a link-segment model that is representative of the subject being tested. In applying inverse dynamics calculations to a standard link-segment model, several assumptions are commonly made in an effort to simplify the calculations. These assumptions regarding the link-segment model are derived from conventional anatomy and physiology and therefore may not be valid when applied to individuals with lower limb loss because their unique anatomical characteristics and the design of lower limb prosthetic componentry may not be accurately accounted for. This article reviews the validity of applying these common assumptions to the analysis of individuals with lower limb loss, with the goal of enabling prosthetists to better judge the quality and accuracy of empirical research findings by furthering their understanding of inverse dynamic theory and its application to the quantitative gait analysis of individuals with lower limb loss. Copyright © 2009 American Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists.


Kelly A.,MS | Pearson G.D.,MS
Neonatal Network | Year: 2011

Protein C (PC) deficiency is a rare but life-threatening bleeding disorder that can present in the immediate neonatal period. This article presents the case of a baby girl with acute and progressive neonatal purpura fulminans as the presenting feature of PC deficiency. Other common complications of this disease include ophthalmic problems and central nervous system (CNS) changes. Management consists of correcting the coagulopathy, intensive wound care including negative-pressure dressings and skin grafting, and supportive care for the ophthalmic and CNS issues. Long-term follow-up consists of lifelong anticoagulant therapy to avoid recurrence of these complications. © 2011 Springer PublishingCompany.


Burr D.B.,MS | Burr D.B.,University of Indianapolis | Gallant M.A.,MS | Gallant M.A.,University of Indianapolis
Nature Reviews Rheumatology | Year: 2012

The classical view of the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) is that subchondral sclerosis is associated with, and perhaps causes, age-related joint degeneration. Recent observations have demonstrated that OA is associated with early loss of bone owing to increased bone remodelling, followed by slow turnover leading to densification of the subchondral plate and complete loss of cartilage. Subchondral densification is a late event in OA that involves only the subchondral plate and calcified cartilage; the subchondral cancellous bone beneath the subchondral plate may remain osteopenic. In experimental models, inducing subchondral sclerosis without allowing the prior stage of increased bone remodelling to occur does not lead to progressive OA. Therefore, both early-stage increased remodelling and bone loss, and the late-stage slow remodelling and subchondral densification are important components of the pathogenetic process that leads to OA. The apparent paradoxical observations that OA is associated with both increased remodelling and osteopenia, as well as decreased remodelling and sclerosis, are consistent with the spatial and temporal separation of these processes during joint degeneration. This Review provides an overview of current knowledge on OA and discusses the role of subchondral bone in the initiation and progression of OA. A hypothetical model of OA pathogenesis is proposed. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Wang Z.,MS
ICCTP 2010: Integrated Transportation Systems: Green, Intelligent, Reliable - Proceedings of the 10th International Conference of Chinese Transportation Professionals | Year: 2010

A High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane is typically a retrofitted lane next to the median along urban freeways that is dedicated to high occupancy vehicles with more than one passenger. Due to right-of-way constraints, median barrier and bridge piers may become sight constraints when freeways curve to the left (relative to the direction of travel), so that stopping sight distance would not be satisfied. On the other hand, since an HOV lane is supposed to be operating at a higher level of service than the neighboring mixed-flow lanes, sight constraints may also come from the queued vehicles in the adjacent congested mixed-flow lanes when freeways curve to the right. It is the focus of this paper to demonstrate and evaluate these sight distance constraints and to recommend countermeasures to alleviate or eliminate their impacts, either by reducing design speed, altering horizontal and cross-sectional design, or both. © 2010 ASCE.


PubMed | MS
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Neurological research | Year: 2016

This study evaluates infarct size measurement as an indicator of cerebral ischaemia outcome in a placebo-controlled trial of potential cerebral protection in the unilateral carotid artery ligation in the Monogolian gerbil. Ibuprofen was used in an effort to manipulate infarct size as this agent has been shown to reduce ischaemia in myocardial infarction. Using measurements obtained through an infarct-sizing technique and a statistical power analysis of the method, the sample sizes needed to obtain significant results were projected for this model. In this case, it was not possible to demonstrate an effect of ibuprofen on infarct size although a tendency towards larger infarct size in ibuprofen-treated compared with placebo-treated gerbils was observed (36.1 10.1% versus 30.0 17.5%). The sample sizes needed to find significant changes in infarct size indicate that this model finds a practical use in studying therapies which will alter infarct size by at least 50%. For example, to detect a 30% change in infarct size, 33 successfully infarcted gerbils per group would be needed, but a 50% change would require a more tenable 13 infarcted gerbils per group. However; given the 40% infarction rate of occluded gerbils seen in this study, almost 33 gerbils per group would be required to detect a 50% change. In addition> somatosensory evoked potential was compared with neurological examination as a predictor of infarction. It would be helpful to be able to pre-screen for infarcted gerbils immediately after occlusion in order to direct infarcted gerbils into control and treated groups. Somatosensory evoked potential successfully predicted infarction with a 90% accuracy in 21 gerbils compared with neurological evaluation which was 100% accurate. But the somatosensory evoked potential prediction was made within 15 min of occlusion as opposed to the 6 h of observation during which the neurological evaluation was made.

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