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Nanodiamonds - synthetic industrial diamonds only a few nanometers in size - have recently attracted considerable attention because of the potential they offer for the targeted delivery of vaccines and cancer drugs and for other uses. Thus far, options for imaging nanodiamonds have been limited. Now a team of investigators based at the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital has devised a means of tracking nanodiamonds noninvasively with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), opening up a host of new applications. They report their findings today in the online journal Nature Communications. "With this study, we showed we could produce biomedically relevant MR images using nanodiamonds as the source of contrast in the images and that we could switch the contrast on and off at will," says David Waddington, lead author of the paper and a PhD student at the University of Sydney in Australia. Waddington is currently working with Matthew Rosen, PhD, in the Low-Field Imaging Laboratory at the Martinos Center. "With competing strategies, the nanodiamonds must be prepared externally and then injected into the body, where they can only be imaged for a few hours at most. However, as our technique is biocompatible, we can continue imaging for indefinite periods of time. This raises the possibility of tracking the delivery of nanodiamond-drug compounds for a variety of diseases and providing vital information on the efficacy of different treatment options." Waddington began this work three years ago as part of a Fulbright Scholarship awarded early in his graduate work at the University of Sydney, where he is a member of a team led by study co-author David Reilly, PhD, in the new Sydney Nanoscience Hub - the headquarters of the Australian Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, which launched last year. As part of the Reilly group, Waddington played a crucial role in early successes with nanodiamond imaging, including a 2015 paper in Nature Communications. He then sought to extend the potential of the approach by collaborating with Rosen at the Martinos Center and Ronald Walsworth, PhD, at Harvard University, also a co-author of the current study. Rosen's group is a world leader in the area of ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging, a technique that proved essential to the development of in vivo nanodiamond imaging. Previously, the use of nanodiamond imaging in living systems was limited to regions accessible using optical fluorescence techniques. However, most potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications of nanoparticles, including tracking of complex disease processes like cancer, call for the use of MRI - the gold standard for noninvasive, high-contrast, three-dimensional clinical imaging. In the present study, the researchers show that they could achieve nanodiamond-enhanced MRI by taking advantage of a phenomenon known as the Overhauser effect to boost the inherently weak magnetic resonance signal of diamond through a process called hyperpolarization, in which nuclei are aligned inside a diamond so they create a signal detectable by an MRI scanner. The conventional approach to hyperpolarization uses solid-state physics techniques at cryogenic temperatures, but the signal boost doesn't last very long and is nearly gone by the time the nanoparticle compound is injected into the body. By combining the Overhauser effect with advances in ultra-low-field MRI coming out of the Martinos Center, the researchers were able to overcome this limitation - thus paving the way for high-contrast in vivo nanodiamond imaging over indefinitely long periods of time. High-performance ultra-low-field MRI is itself a relatively new technology, first reported in Scientific Reports in 2015 by Rosen and Martinos Center colleagues. "Thanks to innovative engineering, acquisition strategies and signal processing, the technology offers heretofore unattainable speed and resolution in the ultra-low-field MRI regime," says Rosen, director of the Low-Field Imaging Laboratory, an assistant professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School and the senior author of the current paper. "And importantly, by removing the need for massive, cryogen-cooled superconducting magnets, it opens up a number of new opportunities, including the nanodiamond imaging technique we've just described." The researchers have noted several possible applications for their new approach to nanodiamond-enhanced MRI. These include the accurate detection of lymph node tumors, which can aid in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer, and exploring the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, which can play an important role in the management of ischemic stroke. Because it provides a measurable MR signal for periods of over a month, the technique could benefit applications such as monitoring the response to therapy. Included in treatment monitoring are applications in the burgeoning field of personalized medicine. "The delivery of highly specific drugs is strongly correlated with successful patient outcomes," says Waddington, who was honored with the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Young Scientist Award at the 2016 Experimental NMR Conference in recognition of this work. "However, the response to such drugs often varies significantly on an individual basis. The ability to image and track the delivery of these nanodiamond-drug compounds would, therefore, be greatly advantageous to the development of personalized treatments." The researchers continue to explore the potential of the technique and are now planning a detailed study of the approach in an animal model, while also investigating the behavior of different nanodiamond-drug complexes and imaging them with the new capability. Other authors of the Nature Communications paper include Mathieu Sarracanie and Najat Salameh of the Martinos Center; Huiliang Zhang, and David R. Glenn of the Walsworth team at Harvard University; and Ewa Rej, Torsten Gaebel, and Thomas Boele of the Reilly team at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, University of Sydney. Support for the study includes funding from the U.S. Department of Defense/USAMRMC, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation and the Australian-American Fulbright Commission. Massachusetts General Hospital, founded in 1811, is the original and largest teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School. The MGH Research Institute conducts the largest hospital-based research program in the nation, with an annual research budget of more than $800 million and major research centers in HIV/AIDS, cardiovascular research, cancer, computational and integrative biology, cutaneous biology, genomic medicine, medical imaging, neurodegenerative disorders, regenerative medicine, reproductive biology, systems biology, photomedicine and transplantation biology. The MGH topped the 2015 Nature Index list of health care organizations publishing in leading scientific journals and earned the prestigious 2015 Foster G. McGaw Prize for Excellence in Community Service. In August 2016 the MGH was once again named to the Honor Roll in the U.S. News & World Report list of "America's Best Hospitals."


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: phys.org

Black phosphorous - a layered material, somewhat similar to graphite – has generated much excitement among scientists and engineers because of its many interesting and useful electronic and optical properties. Just as graphite is made up of millions of layers of graphene, black phosphorus consists of layers of phosphorene that can be isolated. New research now reveals phosphorene to possess properties as intriguing as graphene. Combining graphene and other new 2-D materials such as phosphorene, which individually have excellent characteristics complementary to the extraordinary properties of graphene, has resulted in exciting scientific developments and could produce applications as yet beyond our imagination. Now phosphorene is helping scientists to answer the question of whether materials consisting of just one layer of atoms can be superconducting. Superconductors conduct electricity with zero resistance and are always sought after due to their potential applications in sensors, energy-efficient power lines and magnets capable of generating large magnetic fields, such as those used in MRI scanners and levitating trains. Using phosphorene, a University of Manchester team led by Professor Irina Grigorieva clearly shows that atomically thin materials can be true superconductors as long as enough electrons are pumped into the layers. Atomically thin superconductors are desirable in miniature devices but also of much interest to scientists because they can be used to test ideas about the limits of the existence of superconductivity. Bulk materials often become superconducting if a sufficient amount of electrons is added and they start to strongly interact with each other. Superconductivity in one atom thick two-dimensional materials was discovered only a decade ago but the findings often referred not to isolated atomically thin layers but their bulk assemblies and the evidence was so far weak and sometimes controversial. In a report published in Nature Communications, scientists used a process called intercalation – essentially coating phosphorene layers in black phosphorus with different alkali atoms that donate their electrons to phosphorene. In each case this turned black phosphorus into a superconductor with exactly the same properties, irrespective of what kinds of atoms were used to add electrons to the layers of phosphorene. Prof Irina Grigorieva said: "Nothing like this was known before. This new understanding is important for developing atomically thin materials towards applications in electronics and quantum technologies." Renyan Zhang, a PhD student who led the experimental effort, said: "Phosphorene and its parent material, black phosphorus, are in many respects similar to graphene and graphite, so we expected that each electron-donating metal will produce a different superconductor, as is the case with graphene and graphite. But to our great surprise all metal donors produced exactly the same superconducting material, with identical properties." Explore further: Sticky tape & phosphorus the key to ultrathin solar cells


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

DURHAM, N.C. -- A cartilage-mimicking material created by researchers at Duke University may one day allow surgeons to 3-D print replacement knee parts that are custom-shaped to each patient's anatomy. Human knees come with a pair of built-in shock absorbers called the menisci. These ear-shaped hunks of cartilage, nestled between the thigh and shin bones, cushion every step we take. But a lifetime of wear-and-tear -- or a single wrong step during a game of soccer or tennis -- can permanently damage these key supports, leading to pain and an increased risk of developing arthritis. The hydrogel-based material the researchers developed is the first to match human cartilage in strength and elasticity while also remaining 3-D-printable and stable inside the body. To demonstrate how it might work, the researchers used a $300 3-D printer to create custom menisci for a plastic model of a knee. "We've made it very easy now for anyone to print something that is pretty close in its mechanical properties to cartilage, in a relatively simple and inexpensive process," said Benjamin Wiley, an associate professor of chemistry at Duke and author on the paper, which appears online in ACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering. After we reach adulthood, the meniscus has limited ability to heal on its own. Surgeons can attempt to repair a torn or damaged meniscus, but often it must be partially or completely removed. Available implants either do not match the strength and elasticity of the original cartilage, or are not biocompatible, meaning they do not support the growth of cells to encourage healing around the site. Recently, materials called hydrogels have been gaining traction as a replacement for lost cartilage. Hydrogels are biocompatible and share a very similar molecular structure to cartilage: if you zoom in on either, you'll find a web of long string-like molecules with water molecules wedged into the gaps. But researchers have struggled to create recipes for synthetic hydrogels that are equal in strength to human cartilage or that are 3-D-printable. "The current gels that are available are really not as strong as human tissues, and generally, when they come out of a printer nozzle they don't stay put -- they will run all over the place, because they are mostly water," Wiley said. Feichen Yang, a graduate student in Wiley's lab and author on the paper, experimented with mixing together two different types of hydrogels -- one stiffer and stronger, and the other softer and stretchier -- to create what is called a double-network hydrogel. "The two networks are woven into each other," Yang said. "And that makes the whole material extremely strong." By changing the relative amounts of the two hydrogels, Yang could adjust the strength and elasticity of the mixture to arrive at a formula that best matches that of human cartilage. He also mixed in a special ingredient, a nanoparticle clay, to make the mock-cartilage 3-D-printable. With the addition of the clay, the hydrogel flows like water when placed under shear stress, such as when being squeezed through a small needle. But as soon as the stress is gone, the hydrogel immediately hardens into its printed shape. 3-D printing of other custom-shaped implants, including hip replacements, cranial plates, and even spinal vertebrae, is already practiced in orthopedic surgery. These custom implants are based on virtual 3-D models of a patient's anatomy, which can be obtained from computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Meniscus implants could also benefit from 3-D printing's ability to create customized and complex shapes, the researchers say. "Shape is a huge deal for the meniscus," Wiley said. "This thing is under a lot of pressure, and if it doesn't fit you perfectly it could potentially slide out, or be debilitating or painful." "A meniscus is not a homogenous material," Yang added. "The middle is stiffer, And the outside is a bit softer. Multi-material 3-D printers let you print different materials in different layers, but with a traditional mold you can only use one material." In a simple demonstration, Yang took a CT scan of a plastic model of a knee and used the information from the scan to 3-D print new menisci using his double network hydrogel. The whole process, from scan to finished meniscus, took only about a day, he says. "This is really a young field, just starting out," Wiley said. "I hope that demonstrating the ease with which this can be done will help get a lot of other people interested in making more realistic printable hydrogels with mechanical properties that are even closer to human tissue." This research was supported by start-up funds from Duke University and grants from the National Science Foundation (ECCS-1344745, DMR-1253534). CITATION: "3D Printing of a Double Network Hydrogel with a Compression Strength and Elastic Modulus Greater than that of Cartilage," Feichen Yang, Vaibhav Tadepalli and Benjamin J. Wiley. ACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering, online April 3, 2017. DOI: 10.1021/acsbiomaterials.7b00094


A new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique has potential for noninvasive disease diagnosis using current MRI technology, researchers outline in a new report.


News Article | April 12, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Heart is one of the most vital organs of the human body and its health is of utmost importance. Studies in the past have linked cardiovascular diseases occurring in middle age, with a negative effect on the brain later in life. A new study adds weightage to these findings. It reveals that an unhealthy heart in mid-life affects the brain health in the later stages of one's life. The study states that middle aged people with heart disease or stroke risks are more likely to develop Alzheimer's in the latter half of their life. However, surprisingly the association was only discovered when cardiovascular risk factors were present in middle age and not afterward. The study found that if heart disease and stroke risk was present in middle age, people were more likely to have elevated levels of amyloid. These are responsible for the onset of Alzheimer's disease in the latter part of life. Amyloid is a sticky protein compound that clumps together to form plaques in people's brain. Rebecca Gottesman, the study's lead researcher, stated that MRI scans of senior individuals showed large deposits of amyloids in their brains. Amyloid deposit was observed only in individuals who were smokers, obese, diabetic, or had high cholesterol in their system during middle age. Gottesman shared that the above-mentioned risk factors can negatively impact an individual's blood vessels, commonly known as vascular health. "Amyloid is what we think, by leading hypotheses, accumulates to cause Alzheimer's disease. So this suggests that vascular risk in middle age may play a direct role in the development of Alzheimer's disease," said Gottesman. To discover the association between mid-life vascular risks and later-age Alzheimer's or dementia, Gottesman and her fellow researchers reviewed data collected by another ongoing study. The researchers observed data of roughly 350 people without signs of dementia. These subjects hailed from Forsyth County, Washington County, and Jackson. These individuals' heart health had been tracked since 1987 by an ongoing study. At the start of this study, the average age of the participants was determined to be 52 years. Nearly 60 percent participants were female and 43 percent were black. With a 24-year follow-up period, all the participants were asked to come back for a check up to test for the presence of amyloid in brain. The tests that were conducted two decades later revealed the association between vascular risks and brain amyloids. Moreover, the link did not vary on the basis of race or genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's. It was also seen that the cardiovascular risk factors that came up in the latter stages of life were in no way associated with the amyloid level found in the brain. Thus, unhealthy habits and risk factors of middle age are what apparently influence the brain amyloid in the later part of life. The study also concluded that the presence or two or more vascular risk factors in the middle age roughly triples the level of amyloid deposits in one's brain. One risk factor alone is likely to increase the amyloid deposit by 88 percent. Apart from these, obesity was deemed to be the most dangerous of all vascular risk factors present in the middle age. Obesity alone was found to have doubled the risk of elevated amyloid deposit in the brain. The study, however, did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship between mid-life vascular risk factors and the onset of Alzheimer's later in life. The findings of the study have been published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on April 11. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Bottom Line: A noninvasive PET imaging method that measures granzyme B, a protein released by immune cells to kill cancer cells, was able to distinguish mouse and human tumors that responded to immune checkpoint inhibitors from those that did not respond early in the course of treatment. Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Author: Umar Mahmood, MD, PhD, professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and director of the Division of Precision Medicine at Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging in Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Boston. Background: Although immunotherapies, such as checkpoint inhibitors, have revolutionized cancer treatment, they only work in a minority of patients, which means that most patients receiving this treatment will not benefit but still have the increased risk of side effects, besides losing time that they could spend on other therapies, Mahmood explained. Response to immunotherapy often cannot be measured effectively at early time points by traditional imaging techniques that measure tumor size, such as CT and MRI scans, or those that measure tumor glucose uptake, such as FDG PET, because these techniques cannot distinguish a nonresponding tumor from a tumor that is responding to immunotherapy but appears to grow in size because it is filled with immune cells and accompanied by increased glucose uptake, Mahmood noted. Tissue biopsies can be unreliable because of tumor heterogeneity and constant changes in the levels of the biomarker proteins measured. How the Study Was Conducted: Mahmood and colleagues designed a probe that binds to granzyme B--a protein that immune cells release to kill their target--after it is released from the immune cells, so they could directly measure tumor cell killing. The researchers attached the probe to a radioactive atom and used PET scanning to noninvasively image the entire body and see where immune cells are actively releasing tumor-killing granzyme B. Results:The team tested their probe in tumor-bearing mice before and after treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors and found that one group of mice had high PET signal, meaning high levels of granzyme B in the tumors, while the other group had low levels of PET signal in the tumors. When the two groups of mice were followed, all mice with high PET signal responded to the therapy and their tumors subsequently regressed, whereas those with low PET signal did not respond to the therapy, and their tumors continued to grow. "Because PET imaging is quantitative, we could measure the degree of effectiveness and put a number on it," Mahmood added. When they compared the data from monotherapy and combination therapy, they saw a significant increase in tumor granzyme B PET signal in the combination group. The researchers then collaborated with Keith Flaherty, MD, and Genevieve Boland, MD, PhD, from MGH, and tested their probe on nine human melanoma biopsy samples, six from patients treated with nivolumab (Opdivo) and three from those treated with pembrolizumab (Keytruda). They detected high levels of granzyme B in the samples from responders and much lower levels in the samples from nonresponders. Author Comment: "The ability to differentiate early in the course of treatment patients who are likely to benefit from immunotherapy from those who will not can greatly improve individual patient care and help accelerate the development of new therapies," Mahmood said. "In our study, we found a marker that was highly predictive of response to immunotherapy at a very early time after starting treatment, and we were able to design an imaging probe to detect this marker and accurately predict response noninvasively," said Mahmood. "These findings could have a significant impact on drug development, as different combinations could be imaged at very early time points in patients and the levels of tumor granzyme B used to compare treatments and rank effectiveness," Mahmood said. "Further, therapeutics that achieve high levels of granzyme B release can be advanced faster and those leading to low granzyme B release can be altered or eliminated." Limitations: A limitation of the study is that the probe has not yet been tested in the clinic, but the researchers are actively pursuing it, Mahmood noted. Funding & Disclosures: This study was funded by the National Institutes of Health. Mahmood is the cofounder and consultant at CytoSite BioPharma, a company that is further developing the granzyme B PET imaging probe for clinical translation. Founded in 1907, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) is the world's first and largest professional organization dedicated to advancing cancer research and its mission to prevent and cure cancer. AACR membership includes more than 37,000 laboratory, translational, and clinical researchers; population scientists; other health care professionals; and patient advocates residing in 108 countries. The AACR marshals the full spectrum of expertise of the cancer community to accelerate progress in the prevention, biology, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer by annually convening more than 30 conferences and educational workshops, the largest of which is the AACR Annual Meeting with more than 21,900 attendees. In addition, the AACR publishes eight prestigious, peer-reviewed scientific journals and a magazine for cancer survivors, patients, and their caregivers. The AACR funds meritorious research directly as well as in cooperation with numerous cancer organizations. As the Scientific Partner of Stand Up To Cancer, the AACR provides expert peer review, grants administration, and scientific oversight of team science and individual investigator grants in cancer research that have the potential for near-term patient benefit. The AACR actively communicates with legislators and other policymakers about the value of cancer research and related biomedical science in saving lives from cancer. For more information about the AACR, visit http://www. .


The global magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) market is expected to reach an approximate value of USD 5.6 billion by 2025 Constant introduction of advanced disease diagnostic technologies is primarily boosting the growth. In addition, the rapid growth of MRI sector is attributed to the growing prevalence of chronic diseases which require early diagnosis and timely treatment to prevent late stage complications. Also, rising number of road accidents leading to injuries and complications are augmenting the demand for this modality. The musculoskeletal and spine injuries also demand for magnetic resonance imaging systems for better scans using high-resolution scanning technique. On the other hand, high cost of these products, and requirement of qualified professional to operate the device are some of the major factors challenging the growth of the market. Moreover, prolonged life span of these devices is resulting in delayed repeat purchase and thereby hindering the market growth. Furthermore, players are adopting various strategies such as merges and acquisitions, and collaborations to remain competent in the space. For instance, Aurora Imaging Technology signed a distribution agreement with Sumec Group Corporation. Under the terms of agreement, Sumec Corporation is distributing Aurora Imaging Technology's MRI system in China. The agreement provided a platform for both the companies to expand their diagnostics and screening market for breast scans using Aurora MRI system in China. Further Key Findings from the Study Suggest: Key Topics Covered: 1 Research Methodology 2 Executive Summary 3 Magnetic Resonance Imaging Market Variables, Trends & Scope 3.1 Market segmentation & scope 3.2 Market Driver Analysis 3.2.1 Rising prevalence of chronic diseases 3.2.2 Technological advancement 3.2.3 Increasing awareness of early diagnosis 3.3 Market Restraints Analysis 3.3.1 High cost of MRI system 3.3.2 Depleting helium deposits 3.3.3 Declining reimbursement rates for MRI 3.4 Penetration & growth prospect mapping 3.5 Magnetic Resonance Imaging - SWOT Analysis, By Factor (political & legal, economic and technological) 3.6 Industry Analysis - Porter's 4 Magnetic Resonance Imaging Market: Architecture Estimates & Trend Analysis 4.1 Magnetic resonance imaging market: Architecture movement analysis 4.2 Open Systems 4.3 Closed System 5 Magnetic Resonance Imaging Market: Field Strength Estimates & Trend Analysis 5.2 Low Field Strength 5.3 Mid Field Strength 5.4 High Field Strength 6 Magnetic Resonance Imaging Market: Application Estimates & Trend Analysis 6.2 Brain & Neurological 6.3 Spine & Musculoskeletal 6.4 Vascular 6.5 Abdominal 6.6 Cardiac 6.7 Breast 6.8 Others 7 Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Regional Estimates & Trend Analysis, by Architecture, Field Strength and Application 8 Competitive Landscape For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/2ns2pp/magnetic To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/research-and-markets---global-magnetic-resonance-imaging-mri-market-2014-2017--2025-with-siemens-ag-koninklijke-philips-nv-ge-healthcare-hitachi-medical-systems-dominating-300444226.html


Advance Anesthesia Monitoring Devices Market Information by Type (gas monitors, standalone capnography monitors, depth of anesthesia, and MRI compatible anesthesia monitors), by End User (Hospitals, Clinics, ambulatory services) - Forecast to 2027Pune, India - April 25, 2017 /MarketersMedia/ — The various major growth of the market is due to immense growth of the application such as include target products & services, Develop new product, target patients, digital marketing and others. Hottest trend in the market All systems that include anesthesia require solid anesthesia monitors to keep up patient security. There are a few types of anesthesia monitors and related medicinal equipment being used. The decision of proper monitoring equipment relies on upon the kind of cases to be performed in a specific setting. The American Society of Anesthesiologists suggests that a patient experiencing anesthesia be checked for heart rate, pulse, oxygen immersion, carbon dioxide, oxygen levels, and different vitals. Key Players • Nihon Kohden Corporation (China) • GE Healthcare (U.K.) • Philips Healthcare (The Netherlands) • Draegerwerk AG & Co. KGaA (Germany) • Masimo (U.S.) • Infinium Medical (U.S.) • Medtronic (U.S.) • Mindray Medical International Limited (China) Request a Sample Report @ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/sample_request/1071 Market Scenario Globally the market for Advance Anesthesia Monitoring Devices is increasing rapidly the main reason for this is the growth in safety of patients. The factors that influence the growth of Advance Anesthesia Monitoring Devices Market are the increasing technology development in healthcare devices, Healthcare organizations encouraging patients to go undergo anesthesia monitoring. The market is also growing due to usage of Advance Anesthesia Monitoring Devices in wide range of treatment. Segments By Type o Gas Monitors o Standalone Capnography Monitors o Depth Of Anesthesia o Mri Compatible Anesthesia Monitors By End-Users o Hospitals o Research Laboratories o Clinics o Ambulatory Services Table of Content 1. Report prologue 2. Introduction 2.1 Definition 2.2 Scope of the study 2.2.1 Research objective 2.2.2 Assumptions 2.2.3 Limitations 2.3 Market structure 3. Research Methodology 3.1 Research process 3.2 Primary research 3.3 Secondary research 3.4 Market size estimation 3.5 Forecast model 4. Market Dynamics 4.1 Drivers 4.2 Restraints 4.3 Opportunities 4.4 Challenges 4.5 Macroeconomic Indicators 5. Market factor analysis 5.1 Value chain analysis/Supply chain analysis 5.2 Porters five forces 5.2.1. Bargaining Power of suppliers 5.2.2. Bargaining Power of Customer 5.2.3. Intensity of Competitor’s 5.2.4. Threat of New Entrants 5.2.5 Threat of Substitutes Continue……. Browse Report @ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/advance-anesthesia-monitoring-devices-market The report for Advance Anesthesia Monitoring Devices of Market Research Future comprises of extensive primary research along with the detailed analysis of qualitative as well as quantitative aspects by various industry experts, key opinion leaders to gain the deeper insight of the market and industry performance. The report gives the clear picture of current market scenario which includes historical and projected market size in terms of value and volume, technological advancement, macro economical and governing factors in the market. The report provides details information and strategies of the top key players in the industry. The report also gives a broad study of the different market segments and regions. Related Report Global Astigmatism Market Information, by type (Myopic Astigmatism, Hyperopic Astigmatism and others), by treatment (Corrective Lenses, Orthokeratology (Ortho-K), Surgeries and others), by end user (Hospital, Clinics and others) - Forecast to 2022 https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/astigmatism-market About Market Research Future: At Market Research Future (MRFR), we enable our customers to unravel the complexity of various industries through our Cooked Research Report (CRR), Half-Cooked Research Reports (HCRR), Raw Research Reports (3R), Continuous-Feed Research (CFR), and Market Research & Consulting Services. Contact Info:Name: Akash AnandEmail: akash.anand@marketresearchfuture.comOrganization: Market Research FutureAddress: Office No. 528, Amanora Chambers Magarpatta Road, HadapsarPhone: +1 646 845 9312Source URL: http://marketersmedia.com/advance-anesthesia-monitoring-devices-market-2017-to-2027-global-key-vendors-analysis-revenue-trends-and-forecast/189937For more information, please visit https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/advance-anesthesia-monitoring-devices-marketSource: MarketersMediaRelease ID: 189937


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Advanced Rehabilitation of Jersey City recently announced that they will be offering Cox Technic therapy services after two of their on-staff doctors became certified in the technique. Cox Technic therapy is an “evidence-based spinal manipulation with a rich history of clinical and biomechanical research efforts performed in laboratories [...] with practitioner excitement and desire to show what is possible with non-surgical, chiropractic spine care for many spine conditions.” The therapy is useful in treating and managing a number of different conditions, especially neck pain, as it reduces pressure on the vertebrae. Treatment typically involves spinal flexion-distraction and decompression, in addition to a number of protocols, including: “electrical stimulation, physiological therapeutics, including heat and ice therapy, massage therapy, trigger point therapy, exercise, nutrition, neck or back braces, back school instruction, pain management, X-rays, MRI / imaging, and ergonomic training.” Neck pain can be caused by any number of factors, including physical and environmental. Stress on the vertebrae from trauma and poor posture can lead to a lifetime of neck pain if left untreated. Non-surgical interventions like Cox Therapy are recommended as a first line of defense in treating neck pain. “Treating neck pain is a process that involves both the patient and the health care provider. At ARJC, we work towards creating an individualized care program that works for each patient and responds to their particular needs and life circumstances. Sometimes treatment is as simple as identifying environmental causes of pain, like a poorly-designed workspace or long commute. With just a few short treatments, many of our patients find relief.” said a staff member. In addition to Cox Therapy, ARJC offers a wide variety of services to address neck pain. The clinic staff includes a number of medical specialists who care care for patients. In addition to an on-staff neurologist and pain management specialist, a team of chiropractors and physical therapists are available. In addition to chiropractic, pain management, massage and physical therapy and accident rehabilitation services, the clinic also offers nutrition, diet, exercise and supplementation consultations to support overall patient health. Neck pain sufferers from Jersey City, Hoboken, Bayonne and surrounding areas are encouraged to contact ARJC for a consultation to learn more about what treatment options are available to them. Visit http://www.jerseycitypainmanagement.com/ or call (201) 795-1665 to learn more.


News Article | April 29, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Diabetes is a troublesome disease that causes complications that increase the chances of contracting other serious health conditions. A study published on April 27 provides proof that diabetes, along with excess weight, damages the brain. The study suggests that people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should keep their weight at normal levels because overweight diabetics are more at risk for cognitive decline and psychiatric illnesses. The researchers assembled a group of 50 overweight individuals aged 30 to 60 who were in the early stages of type 2 diabetes. Two other groups were gathered to match the original group according to age and sex. The second group was composed of 50 normal-weight type 2 diabetics who were also in the early stages, while the third, a control group, consisted of 50 healthy individuals. The researchers focused their attention on brain functions that usually affect type 2 diabetics and noted that obesity also attacks the same areas in the brain. "So, if you have both, will it be worse than if you have them alone? That's what we looked at in this particular study," endocrinologist and study co-author Dr. Donald C. Simonson said. The participants underwent a magnetic resonance imaging scan and were given psychological examinations that tested their memory, executive function (cognition and planning), and psychomotor speed (reaction time). By studying the MRI scan results and psychological tests taken by the three subgroups, the researchers discovered that a significant thinning of the cerebral cortex, as well as increased presence of white matter abnormalities, occurred in overweight diabetic participants. "Cortical thickness was decreased in several regions of the diabetic brains. Further thinning of the temporal lobes found in overweight/obese individuals with type 2 diabetes suggests that these regions are specifically vulnerable to combined effects of obesity and type 2 diabetes," said Dr. In Kyoon Lyoo, the study's senior author and the director of the Brain Institute in South Korea's Ewha University. Type 2 diabetics with a normal body mass index also showed similar results but the damage was not as advanced as that in overweight participants. "Most of the things we looked at, you could see that there was a progression, and the obese patients with diabetes were worse than the lean patients with diabetes, and they were both worse than the age-matched controls," Simonson explained. The study notes that the damaged areas in the brain cater to language comprehension and long-term memory. What is more significant in the findings is that the combined obesity and type 2 diabetes damage is only a milder form of the abnormalities that show up in Alzheimer's disease patients, leading the researchers to believe that diabetes may be a risk factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease. The research, titled "Brain changes in overweight/obese and normal-weight adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus," was published in the journal Diabetologia. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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