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Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Neuroscience in Intensive Care International Symposium - NICIS - AMERICA - Industry/Commercial Rate" conference to their offering. This year's conference is devoted to the theme of Precision Medicine for Neurocritical Care and Stroke. Advances in genetics and in image-guided therapy are already leading to major changes in the classification, management and outcomes of patients with ischemic stroke. New management paradigms are being actively explored in the domains of acute neurological injury intracerebral haemorrhage, subarachnoid haemorrhage, anoxic-ischemic brain injury, traumatic brain injury. However, more effective predictive modelling and treatment strategies are desperately needed in these populations. THE ORGANIZERS Robert Stevens, MD, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University Jan Claassen, MD, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Neurology, Department of Neurology, Columbia University Jose Suarez, MD, Professor, Neurology-Vascular Critical Care, Baylor College of Medicine Tarek Sharshar, MD, Senior Consultant, Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Raymond Poincaré Hospital, Professor, The University of Versailles Agenda: The following is a preliminary agenda. Please check back in the coming weeks for additions to the agenda, for additional information regarding the presentations and the full two-day tiimeline of events. March 2nd, 2017 THE POTENTIAL FOR TRANSFORMATION KEYNOTE ADDRESS: The BRAIN Initiative Walter Koroshetz, MD, Director, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), NIH Towards a Molecular Taxonomy of Cancer Chetan Bettegowda, MD, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University Precision Medicine for Critical Care Tim Buchman, Ph.D., MD, Director, Emory Critical Care Center, Emory University BIG SCIENCE The Precision Medicine Initiative Joni Rutter, Ph.D., Division Director, DBNBR, National Institutes of Health (NIH) Consortia for Stroke Genetics Jonathan Rosand, MD, MSc, Chief, Division of Neurocritical Care & Emergency Neurology, Harvard University Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge (TRACK) in TBI Ramon Diaz-Arrastia, MD, Ph.D., Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania Cardiovascular Research Grid Rai Winslow, Ph.D., Director, Center for Cardiovascular Bioinformatics & Modeling, Johns Hopkins University The Human Connectome Project Todd Constable, Ph.D., Professor of Radiology and Neurosurgery, Director MRI Research, Yale University METHODOLOGIES Statistical Models for Dense Biosignal Analysis Ciprian Crainiceanu, Ph.D., Professor of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University Systems Biology for Biomarker Discovery and Validation Akhilesh Pandey, MD, Ph.D., Professor, Johns Hopkins University Adaptive Clinical Trial Design in Acute Neurology Jose Suarez, MD, Professor of Neurology-Vascular Critical Care, Baylor College of Medicine Modeling Approaches to Physiologic Data Thomas Heldt, Ph.D., MS, Mphil, Assistant Professor Electrical and Biomedical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Machine Learning for Clinical Prediction Saria Suchi, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University Precision Medicine in the Neuro ICU: Multiparametric Prediction of Vasospasm After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Soojin Park, MD, FAHA, FNCS, Assistant Professor of Neurology, Neurocritical Care Fellowship Director Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons    BIOLOGICAL METHODS Computational Modeling of Stroke Recovery in Humans John Krakauer, MA, MD, Professor of Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine, Johns Hopkins University Brain-microbiome Crosstalk in Ischemic Stroke Constantino Iadecola, MD, Director, Brain & Mind Research Institute, Cornell University Biological Model of Brain Dysfunction in Sepsis Tarek Sharshar, Ph.D., Senior Consultant, Intensive Care Medicine, University of Versailles, France March 3rd, 2017 CLINICAL TRIALS Goals for Blood Pressure Management in Intracerebral Hemorrhage Adnan Qureshi, MD, Professor of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Radiology, University of Minnesota Personalized Targets for Hemodynamic Management in Neurocritical Care Christos Lazaridis, MD, Assistant Professor, Neurology, Baylor College of Medicine Selection of Intracerebral Hemorrhage Patients for Minimally Invasive Surgery Daniel Hanley, MD, Professor of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University PREDICTION Predictive Analytics for Impending Clinical Deterioration Dana Edelson, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Chicago Quantitative Electroencephalographic Signatures for Prediction in Severe Brain Injury Jan Claassen, MD, Ph.D., FNCS, Head of Neurocritical Care and Medical Director of the Neurological ICU, Columbia University MRI Pattern Classification for TBI Detection and Prediction Yvonne Lui, MD, Associate Professor, Radiology, New York University Discriminative Mapping for Coma Recovery Prediction Robert Stevens, MD, Associate Professor, Anesthesiology & Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University Speakers: Chetan Bettegowda, MD, Ph.D., Associate Professor Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University Tim Buchman, Ph.D., MD, Director, Emory Critical Care Center, Emory University Jan Claassen, MD, Ph.D., FNCS, Head of Neurocritical Care, Columbia University Ciprian Crainiceanu, Ph.D., Professor of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University Ramon Diaz-Arrastia, MD, Ph.D., Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania Dana Edelson, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Chicago Daniel Hanley, MD, Professor of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University Constantino Iadecola, MD, Director, Brain & Mind Research Institute, Cornell University Walter Koroshetz, MD, Director, NINDS John Krakauer, MA, MD, Professor of Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine, Johns Hopkins University Christos Lazaridis, MD, Assistant Professor, Neurology, Baylor College of Medicine Yvonne Lui, MD, Associate Professor of Radiology, New York University Akhilesh Pandey, MD, Ph.D., Professor, Johns Hopkins University Adnan Qureshi, MD, Professor of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Radiology, University of Minnesota Jonathan Rosand, MD, MSc, Chief, Division of Neurocritical Care & Emergency Neurology, Harvard University Joni Rutter, Ph.D., Division Director, DBNBR, National Institutes of Health Tarek Sharshar, Ph.D., Senior Consultant, Intensive Care Medicine, University of Versailles, France Robert Stevens, MD, Associate Professor of Anesthesiology & Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University Jose Suarez, MD, Professor of Neurology-Vascular Critical Care, Baylor College of Medicine Rai Winslow, Ph.D., Director, Center for Cardiovascular Bioinformatics and Modeling, Johns Hopkins University For more information about this conference visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/9mbnwd/neuroscience_in Research and Markets Laura Wood, Senior Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call +1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call +1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900 U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907 Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716


Hossain J.,Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions | Du Y.,Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions | Links J.,Johns Hopkins University | Rahmim A.,Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions | And 4 more authors.
Physics in Medicine and Biology | Year: 2015

Whole-heart coronary flow reserve (CFR) may be useful as an early predictor of cardiovascular disease or heart failure. Here we propose a simple method to extract the time-activity curve, an essential component needed for estimating the CFR, for a small number of compartments in the body, such as normal myocardium, blood pool, and ischemic myocardial regions, from SPECT data acquired with conventional cameras using slow rotation. We evaluated the method using a realistic simulation of 99mTc-teboroxime imaging. Uptake of 99mTc-teboroxime based on data from the literature were modeled. Data were simulated using the anatomically-realistic 3D NCAT phantom and an analytic projection code that realistically models attenuation, scatter, and the collimator-detector response. The proposed method was then applied to estimate time activity curves (TACs) for a set of 3D volumes of interest (VOIs) directly from the projections. We evaluated the accuracy and precision of estimated TACs and studied the effects of the presence of perfusion defects that were and were not modeled in the estimation procedure. The method produced good estimates of the myocardial and blood-pool TACS organ VOIs, with average weighted absolute biases of less than 5% for the myocardium and 10% for the blood pool when the true organ boundaries were known and the activity distributions in the organs were uniform. In the presence of unknown perfusion defects, the myocardial TAC was still estimated well (average weighted absolute bias <10%) when the total reduction in myocardial uptake (product of defect extent and severity) was ≤5%. This indicates that the method was robust to modest model mismatch such as the presence of moderate perfusion defects and uptake nonuniformities. With larger defects where the defect VOI was included in the estimation procedure, the estimated normal myocardial and defect TACs were accurate (average weighted absolute bias ≈5% for a defect with 25% extent and 100% severity). © 2015 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.


More than 50 Percent of the Excess Return Delivered over the First Three Years of the MSCI Emerging Markets ESG Index was Attributable to ESG Factors Such as Carbon Emissions, Product Safety and Business Ethics; While ESG Data in Isolation Has Been Less Predictive of Returns in Developed Markets, Many Active Managers Integrating ESG Analysis Alongside Financial Analysis Have Outperformed MSCI World Index in Recent Years LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM and BOSTON, MA--(Marketwired - Nov 3, 2016) - Investors who picked emerging markets stocks based on their environmental, social and governmental (ESG) rating potentially outperformed those that ignored them, according to a new report by global investment firm Cambridge Associates, The Value of ESG Data: Early Evidence for Emerging Markets Equities. The analysis found that over the past three years -- when the MSCI Emerging Markets ESG Index outperformed its parent index, the MSCI Emerging Markets Index, by a cumulative 12 percent on a total return US dollar basis -- more than 50 percent of the outperformance was attributable to ESG factors alone. Analysis of all the emerging markets ESG data that was available for the preceding six and half years broadly supported this finding. According to MSCI guidelines, there are nearly 40 different types of ESG factors. Those under "environmental" include carbon emissions, toxic waste, and opportunities such as green buildings and renewable energy. Those under "social," the largest of the three categories, include health and safety for employees, product safety and quality, controversial sourcing and opportunities such as access to finance. Under "governance," factors include business ethics and anti-competitive practices. Chris Varco, Senior Investment Director for Mission-Related Investing at Cambridge Associates and author of the report, said: "Using these criteria to help pick stocks in emerging markets really helps to separate the wheat from the chaff. Of the 367 basis points of annualised outperformance achieved by the MSCI Emerging Markets ESG Index, some 199 basis points were attributable to ESG factors after we accounted for the contribution of other factors such as country, currency, sector and style." Varco continued: "This is particularly important because ESG factors typically tilt towards equity styles that have recently outperformed, for example, quality-focused growth. Our study therefore refutes the assertion that ESG factors are just proxies for other things, rather than valuable investment tools in their own right." Cambridge Associates conducted an attribution analysis to determine the unique contribution of ESG selection. The other factors were significantly smaller contributors to the outperformance than ESG considerations: sector (107 basis points), style (63 basis points), and currency (4 basis points). The country factor was a detractor, reducing the ESG version's outperformance by 5 basis points. The three-year period under review ran from June 2013, when the MSCI Emerging Markets ESG Index was launched. The Value of ESG Data report from Cambridge Associates looked further back at older data from January 2007 up to the index launch, and found that ESG ratings were a strong source of stock-specific outperformance during most of this earlier six and a half year period as well. Why ESG Factors Matter in the Emerging Markets Many investors are overlooking the value of ESG factors -- in effect, ignoring the stream of new data that has become available over the past five years, according to Varco. "ESG data should be a key tool for investors in the emerging markets," said Varco. "When making investment decisions, investors in emerging markets equities often focus on commodity prices, currency, and macroeconomic factors, as well as domestic consumption trends, and they tend to underestimate the value of this widely available information on the ESG strength of companies in emerging markets." Varco also attributed the success of the MSCI Emerging Markets ESG Index to the avoidance of state-owned enterprises (SOEs), which feature prominently in the parent MSCI Emerging Markets Index. "SOEs are influenced by interests beyond generating profits for shareholders, which can negatively impact operational aspects of the business," he said. "The same accusation has been made for some family-owned businesses, which are also common in emerging markets." Cambridge Associates found that there were 13 SOEs among the 40 largest companies in the parent MSCI Emerging Markets Index during the last three years. Of those 13, the MSCI Emerging Markets ESG Index had a zero weighting in 11 of them. In the two companies where the MSCI Emerging Markets ESG Index was overweight relative to the parent index, Cambridge Associates concluded that "this was a poor decision, as both detracted from relative performance on a stock-specific basis." There are few dedicated active ESG funds focusing on the emerging markets -- but this is set to change. Noelle Laing, Managing Director for MRI Research at Cambridge Associates, said: "As a result of growing demand from investors, we have been consulting on and facilitating the creation of several emerging market ESG funds which integrate consideration of ESG factors in a meaningful way." Laing added: "Even beyond the actively-managed funds that outperformed the MSCI Emerging Markets Index since their inception, a growing number of mainstream asset managers are placing more emphasis on ESG factors of the companies they analyse, even if their products do not necessarily have a defined ESG label." ESG Factors Should Be Used in a "Nuanced Way" in Developed Markets While ESG factors have a clear value for investors in emerging markets, their value for investors in developed markets is less clear. Cambridge Associates found that for the nearly six-year period that could be examined for developed markets, the MSCI World ESG Index slightly underperformed the MSCI World Index, its parent index, by 10 basis points. Further analysis found that ESG factors negatively impacted the performance of the MSCI World Index, detracting 54 basis points from the excess return on an annualised basis. The key observation is that ESG-based stock selection added value outside the United States, but struggled with stock selection in this market. Explaining this, Varco said: "Some mega-cap US companies that performed well in recent years were excluded from the ESG index, significantly harming relative performance." He cited four stocks -- Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Home Depot -- which were completely excluded from the ESG index during the entire three-year period. Cambridge Associates found that ESG data could be valuable in developed markets if used in a nuanced way. Unlike the MSCI World ESG Index, many active managers integrating ESG analysis alongside financial analysis have outperformed MSCI World in recent years. For more information, or to speak with Chris Varco or Noelle Laing, please contact Eric Mosher, Sommerfield Communications, Inc., at +1 (212) 255-8386 / Eric@sommerfield.com. Cambridge Associates is a global investment firm founded in 1973 that builds customised investment portfolios for institutional investors and private clients around the world. Working alongside its early clients, among them several leading universities, the firm pioneered the strategy of high equity orientation and broad diversification, which since the 1980s has been a primary driver of performance for these leading fiduciary investors. Cambridge Associates serves over 1,100 global investors -- primarily foundations and endowments, pensions and family offices -- and delivers a range of services, including outsourced investment (OCIO) solutions, traditional consulting services, and access to research and tools across global asset classes. Cambridge Associates has more than 1,300 employees -- including over 150 research staff -- serving its client base globally. The firm maintains offices in Arlington, VA; Boston; Dallas; Menlo Park and San Francisco, CA; London; Singapore; Sydney; and Beijing. Cambridge Associates consists of five global investment consulting affiliates that are all under common ownership and control. For more information about Cambridge Associates, please visit www.cambridgeassociates.com. This press release is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to be investment advice. Any references to specific investments are for illustrative purposes only. The information herein does not constitute a personal recommendation or take into account the particular investment objectives, financial situations, or needs of individual clients. This release is not an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy any security in any jurisdiction. Past performance is not a guarantee of future returns. Broad-based securities indices are unmanaged and are not subject to fees and expenses typically associated with managed accounts or investment funds. Investments cannot be made directly in an index.

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