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Dahlem, Germany

Reuner A.,University of Stuttgart | Hengherr S.,University of Stuttgart | Mali B.,Wildau University of Applied Sciences | Forster F.,University of Wurzburg | And 6 more authors.
Cell Stress and Chaperones | Year: 2010

Semi-terrestrial tardigrades exhibit a remarkable tolerance to desiccation by entering a state called anhydrobiosis. In this state, they show a strong resistance against several kinds of physical extremes. Because of the probable importance of stress proteins during the phases of dehydration and rehydration, the relative abundance of transcripts coding for two α-crystallin heat-shock proteins (MtsHsp17.2 and Mt-sHsp19.5), as well for the heat-shock proteins Mt-sHsp10, Mt-Hsp60, Mt-Hsp70 and Mt-Hsp90, were analysed in active and anhydrobiotic tardigrades of the species Milnesium tardigradum. They were also analysed in the transitional stage (I) of dehydration, the transitional stage (II) of rehydration and in heat-shocked specimens. A variable pattern of expression was detected, with most candidates being downregulated. Gene transcripts of one Mt-hsp70 isoform in the transitional stage I and Mt-hsp90 in the anhydrobiotic stage were significantly upregulated. A high gene expression (778.6-fold) was found for the small α-crystallin heat-shock protein gene Mt-sHsp17.2 after heat shock. We discuss the limited role of the stress-gene expression in the transitional stages between the active and anhydrobiotic tardigrades and other mechanisms which allow tardigrades to survive desiccation. © Cell Stress Society International 2009. Source

Sieger D.,EMBL Heidelberg | Moritz C.,EMBL Heidelberg | Ziegenhals T.,EMBL Heidelberg | Prykhozhij S.,MPI for Molecular Genetics | Peri F.,EMBL Heidelberg
Developmental Cell | Year: 2012

Microglia are the resident phagocytes of the brain that are responsible for the clearance of injured neurons, an essential step in subsequent tissue regeneration. How death signals are controlled both in space and time to attract these cells toward the site of injury is a topic of great interest. To this aim, we have used the optically transparent zebrafish larval brain and identified rapidly propagating Ca2+ waves that determine the range of microglial responses to neuronal cell death. We show that while Ca2+-mediated microglial responses require ATP, the spreading of intercellular Ca2+ waves is ATP independent. Finally, we identify glutamate as a potent inducer of Ca2+-transmitted microglial attraction. Thus, this real-time analysis reveals the existence of a mechanism controlling microglial targeted migration to neuronal injuries that is initiated by glutamate and proceeds across the brain in the form of a Ca2+ wave. Source

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