Little Falls, NJ, United States
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Lifton V.A.,MPhase Technologies Inc. | Simon S.,MPhase Technologies Inc. | Holmqvist J.,Silex Microsystems | Ebefors T.,Silex Microsystems | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems | Year: 2012

Design and fabrication of microfluidic energy storage devices that are based on the control of the liquid electrolyte inside a power cell are presented. A 12-cell array of individually addressable reserve microbatteries has been built and tested, yielding ∼10-mAh capacity per each cell in the array. Lithium and manganese dioxide or carbon monofluoride (Li/MnO2 and Li/CF\rm x) have been used as anode and cathode in the battery with LiClO4-based electrolyte. Inherent power management capabilities allow for sequential single cell activation based on the external electronic trigger. The design is based on the superlyophobic porous membrane that keeps liquid electrolyte away from the solid electrode materials. When power is needed, battery activation (a single cell or several cells at once) is accomplished via electrowetting trigger that promotes electrolyte permeation through the porous membrane and wetting of the electrode stack, which combines the chemistry together to release stored electrochemical energy. The membrane and associated package elements are prepared using microelectromechanical system fabrication methods that are described in details along with the assembly methods. © 2012 IEEE.


Lifton V.A.,MPhase Technologies Inc. | Simon S.,MPhase Technologies Inc.
Journal of Porous Materials | Year: 2011

A simple method of preparing porous superhydrophobic materials using glass fiber materials, where hydrophobicity is provided by a variety of coatings such as self-assembled alkyl-silane monolayers and fluoropolymers such as Teflon is presented. Fibrous structures of the filter material provide for the modulation of "surface roughness" on the micro- and nano-scale, required for achieving a superhydrophobic state, with advancing contact angle of water on such surfaces close to 150 degrees. Such superhydrophobic structures are effective at separating water-octane mixtures by allowing only low-surface-tension component to go through the thickness of the material, while repelling the water (high-surface-tension component) and preventing it from permeating through the material. In addition, a bi-layer structure that combines a superhydrophobic surface with a highly hydrophilic bulk material is described. It is formed by subjecting superhydrophobic fiber material to a brief oxygen plasma treatment to remove the hydrophobic coating from one side of the material, whereas the opposite side is protected during treatment and remains superhydrophobic. Tunable properties of the superhydrophobic fiber material are demonstrated using electrowetting with PEDOT-PSS conductive polymer core, parylene as a dielectric and Teflon as a hydrophobic coating. Applicability of such bi-layer materials to microfluidic and energy storage micro-devices is discussed. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Lifton V.A.,MPhase Technologies Inc. | Simon S.,MPhase Technologies Inc.
Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems | Year: 2011

Mechanically robust superhydrophobic Si-based membranes are described. The membranes are prepared using microelectromechanical-systems-type processing and implement nanonail design features that enable superlyophobic (also called omniphobic, superolephobic) behavior. A variety of low- and high-surface-tension liquids are repelled by such porous membranes without liquid penetrating into the pores of the membrane. Electrowetting transitions have been successfully implemented as a way to demonstrate electrically triggered and tunable permeability of the structures. Long-term stability of the hydrophobic coatings based on fluoropolymers has been evaluated using contact angle measurements. Among those, Teflon-based coatings tend to show the best survivability in aqueous and organic electrolytes for periods longer than 200 days of continuous exposure at room temperature and at 60 °C. Such robust membranes are currently used in reserve microbattery technology and microfluidic devices and, potentially, could enable other applications involving fluid separation, fuel cells, and filtration. © 2011 IEEE.


Trademark
MPhase Technologies Inc. | Date: 2014-03-03

Battery chargers.


Trademark
MPhase Technologies Inc. | Date: 2011-03-01

flashlights.


Trademark
MPhase Technologies Inc. | Date: 2011-04-12

batteries.

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