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In terms of user base, Chrome undeniably pushes past Microsoft's Edge, Mozilla's Firefox, and Opera by a mile, making it quite the most popular web browser of choice for millions of users using the web every day. While that's true, Chrome, however, fails to charm even a slight bit in terms of power consumption and memory usage, with it often the culprit of battery drain and performance hiccups. With Chrome 57, those caveats will be no more. Released last week for Mac, Windows, and Linux, the latest version of Chrome introduces background tab throttling, which significantly reduces the power consumption of each open tabs. The resulting impact should deliver 25 percent less busy background tabs, according to Google. By contrast, Chrome on Android devices already heavily throttle, and in some instances even kill, background tabs, but the desktop version of Chrome has so far allowed background tabs to run gung-ho, hogging performance and battery whenever they want, which takes a toll especially on those using laptops. Google originally planned to throttle background tabs as early as Chrome 56, according to Android Police, but because of concerns that it would break a large amount of web pages, it was stashed on the back burner. But the feature has finally been implemented into Chrome 57. Here's how background throttling on Chrome for Desktop works: imagine that each open tab on the browser has a time budget, in seconds, for running timers. If a tab is put into the background and stays there for more than 10 seconds, the time budget is put into effect. When the timer begins running, the run time is subtracted from the time budget, which regenerates at a set rate per second, resulting in a more efficient use of power. Of course, some exceptions still apply, set in place to prevent specific tabs, such as those playing audio, from breaking. Moreover, in version 57 of Chrome, the browser will delay timers to limit CPU load to 1 percent of a core if a particular application uses too much processing power in the background. The team behind Chrome also hopes that developers of web pages will adjust their performance accordingly, relying on new APIs for service workers to do background tasks, instead of simply keeping tabs active at all times. Long story short, this all means that in the end, users can finally rely on Chrome not heavily hogging their laptop's memory and battery. They would simply need to update Chrome to the latest version. Apart from the new welcome addition of background throttling, version 57 of Chrome for iOS also comes with a reading list functionality. Tap the "Share" menu and hit the option to "read later" for later offline viewing. A similar feature is already available to Android for Chrome users. Have you tried Chrome 57? Has it manifested any significant differences in handling background tabs, particularly with its impact on your laptop's battery and performance? Feel free to share your experiences in the comments section below! © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.cnet.com

Nobody likes it when a web browser bombs instead of opening up a website. So if you're a Firefox user, you should be happy with Tuesday's release of Firefox 53, which cuts down browser crashes by 10 percent for most people on Windows computers. The improvement comes through the first big debut of a part of Project Quantum, an effort launched in 2016 to beef up and speed up Firefox. Cutting crashes and boosting performance is crucial to Firefox's future. A decade ago, the browser triumphed in a Mozilla effort to reignite browser innovation, but it's faded with the widespread shift to Google's Chrome. Firefox must keep pace if Mozilla is to keep that competitive pressure alive in the market, especially with rivals like Opera and Brave building their browsers on Google's Chrome foundations. To improve stability, Firefox 53 on Windows machines isolates software called a compositor that's in charge of painting elements of a website onto your screen. That isolation into a separate computing process cuts down on trouble spots that can occur when Firefox employs computers' graphics chips, Mozilla said. About 70 percent of Windows users will get the benefit -- those using updated versions of Windows 7, 8 and 10 on machines with Intel, Nvdia and AMD graphics hardware. On Macs running Apple's MacOS software, compositing is stable, so the separate process isn't required. Another change lets people give Firefox 53 a new look. Two new built-in themes drop the swoopy tabs introduced in 2013 with the Australis project in favor of more compact rectangles that don't take up as much room and that look more like what you see in Microsoft's Edge browser or Apple's Safari. The compact light and nighttime-friendly compact dark themes can be selected in the "appearance" section of Firefox's about:addons setup, but Firefox sticks with the traditional look by default. The themes might not seem like that big a deal but, changing a browser interface can be disorienting for people. But making room for a bit more browser content is important, too. Under the covers, the change is important, too. Firefox fans have built thousands of themes to customize the browser's look, but Mozilla is ripping out the older technology that enables many of those themes to improve Firefox's performance, security and reliability. The new compact light and compact dark themes use a new theme interface that programmers and designers can employ to make themes that'll work in the future. The new Firefox also revamps how you can grant and revoke permission for websites to tap into sensitive computer abilities like the ability to know your location or use your webcam. A multitude of less obvious changes are also built into the browser, which Mozilla updates about every six weeks. Many of them are tweaks that give web programmers new abilities -- things you might not care about, but that are core to Mozilla's effort to advance the web itself. One final note: Firefox 53 drops support for Windows XP and Windows Vista. If you're among the small fraction of people still using these elderly operating systems, which Microsoft no longer supports with bug fixes or security updates, you'll have to use the slower-moving Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR) version. Batteries Not Included: The CNET team reminds us why tech is cool. CNET Magazine: Check out a sample of the stories in CNET's newsstand edition.


Formidable names in the tech world, including Facebook, Mozilla, along with other industry leaders, nonprofit organizations, and the City University of New York banded together to launch a $14 million effort to bolster news literacy in today's age. The funding will be used for the News Integrity Initiative, a concerted effort to increase the trust in journalism globally, while also "better informing the public conversation." As ABC News reports, the initiative will be run as an independent undertaking by the CUNY's Graduate School of Journalism, with the support of the university's Tow-Knight Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism. In a press release, the News Integrity Initiative said the mission is to advance the public's news literacy. The fund will be used to support applied research and products, and will help participants enter meetings and discussions with experts on the field of journalism. The initiative will appoint its own general manager, and the said person will report to CUNY's School of Journalism dean. The early participants will contribute to the overall narrative surrounding news literacy, hold events in different parts of the world, and pitch research projects to the initiative to request for funding. Among these participants are Arizona State University, Edelman, the European Journalism Centre in Netherlands, Hamburg Media School in Germany, Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales, and more. The initiative comes at an opportune time when public trust in the news industry is at a low, according to polls. This incredulity stems from the proliferation of fake news on social media platforms of late, a phenomenon Facebook once shrugged off, but is now working hard to fight. Fake news started getting traction during the 2016 Presidential Election, a time of hotly stringent politics, in which false reports about the candidates masqueraded as legitimate news were being passed around social media. Facebook failed to block these news items from view. Once Trump had won the election, op-eds claiming Hillary Clinton's loss stemmed from the failure to halt fake news propagation circulated around the web. This opened up a debate regarding whether Facebook should take the responsibility for allowing fake news stories to show up on its site sans any repercussions for the perpetrators. But while Facebook downplayed the severity of the allegations, it has since admitted that it was a different kind of tech company, in a way that it's also responsible for the content that's endorsed using its platform. "As part of the Facebook Journalism Project, we want to give people the tools necessary to be discerning about the information they see online," said Campbell Brown, Facebook's head of news partnership. While there's still ample provenance of fake news, it helps that major tech companies like Google and Facebook are facilitating their own measures to stop its ascent, with the former committing to efforts in flagging false and offensive content in search results, and with the latter rolling out a "disputed" tag for known fake news. It doesn't there, of course, but these are crucial first steps. While fake news per se can't be eliminated in one single sweep, helping the public understand the supposed caliber of dignified and accurate journalism they should turn to might at least help them detect particular trouble spots when reading fake news. Online space doesn't foster the same strict rules and standards for publishing as opposed to broadcast journalism, so it's much less of a challenge to push out false information online. Hopefully the News Integrity Initiative helps set the terms on what will stand and what won't. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.techradar.com

Microsoft officially ended support for Windows Essentials in January this year, but left the installer on its site, so fans of the classic software suite could still download Photo Gallery, Movie Maker, Live Mail, and all their other favorites. However, as it signed Windows Vista’s death certificate earlier this month, Microsoft also quietly removed that last link, finally laying Essentials to rest. If you already have it, the programs won’t suddenly stop running, but next time you need to reinstall it, you’ll be stuck. Windows Essentials was excellent in 2012, but its component programs have been superseded by far superior free alternatives. It’s time to move on, and this is the free software to help you do it. Windows 10 comes with its own Mail app, but it doesn’t store any of your messages offline, making it a poor replacement for the venerable Live Mail. Mozilla Thunderbird, from the team behind the Firefox web browser, is a far superior alternative. This feature-packed free email client is easy to set up, and gives you full control over where your messages are archived, and how often. It can also sync your calendars and manage RSS feeds, so you can check the headlines and check your schedule while catching up on emails. If Windows Movie Maker had continued to evolve after 2012, this is what it would look like. Once you’ve launched free video editor Shotcut, simply click the Playlist and Timeline buttons at the top and you’ll find yourself with a very familiar interface with almost no learning curve. Like Movie Maker, Shotcut lets you import video clips, images, and sound files, then drag and drop them onto a timeline. Shotcut is a non-linear editor, so no changes are final until you export your work. Each change you make is stored in an edit decision list, and can be reversed at any time. Shotcut offers an excellent range of audio and video filters, and there are even advanced tools like chroma key compositing for green screen effects. Windows Photo Gallery was a handy jack of all trades that let you view, organize, edit, and share photos without firing up several different programs. Its editing tools were surprisingly advanced, with noise reduction, a healing tool, and red-eye removal alongside more basic functions like rotation and resizing. Free image editor and viewer IrfanView is a perfect upgrade, with all these features and many more. It makes tagging and organizing images a breeze, and supports batch conversion, so you can easily get huge photo collections under control. It’s packed with excellent editing tools, and you can add even more by installing Photoshop plugins. Windows Live Writer wasn’t one of the stars of Windows Essentials, but it was thoughtfully crafted and earned itself a loyal userbase. It supported all the most popular blogging platforms of the day, including WordPress, SharePoint, Blogger, Typepad and LiveJournal. It let writers compose blog posts offline – complete with images, videos, and formatting – and then upload them to multiple platforms at once. A simple premise, but very useful. Open Live Writer is an open source project based on a fork of Windows Live Writer, and the latest release is optimized for use with Windows 10. The project has a bright future, and its ambitious team of volunteer developers are hoping to add plugin support soon. Microsoft’s cloud storage service OneDrive (formerly known as SkyDrive) still exists. In fact, it’s fully incorporated into Windows 8 and 10, appearing alongside your local and networked drives in Windows Explorer. However, the free version gives you just 5GB space for your files, so you’ll soon need to look elsewhere for your online storage and file-sharing needs. That’s why we prefer Mega (aka MegaUpload), which gives free users 50GB to play with. It also supports parallel connections for faster uploads and downloads, and secures files with end-to-end encryption. Like OneDrive, Family Safety has been integrated into the most recent versions of Windows, but if you want an extra layer of security for your kids, free parental control software Qustodio is an excellent choice. The free version of Qustodio (think "custodian") covers the basics, enabling you to set rules and time schedules for web browsing, and block pornography and other unsuitable content like gambing sites. It's an ideal way to boost Microsoft's built-in safety tools if you have young children.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: startupjuncture.com

Five years after its take-off, developer platform Wercker has been acquired by database technology giant Oracle. The sum for which it is acquired has not been disclosed. Oracle (ORCL) shares were up by 0.25% following the acquisition. Wercker is an Amsterdam-based startup that offers tools that enable developers to test and deploy code at a rapid pace. Empowering organisations to achieve continuous integration and continuous delivery goals. Wercker was founded in 2012 by Micha Hernandez van Leuffen. Soon after its launch Wercker announced a seed funding deal of almost $1m by Tier-1 investors like Shamrock Ventures, Greylock Partners and Dutch micro VC Vitulum Ventures. A year later, in 2014, the company raised $2.4 million. Last year a Series A round of $4.5 million followed, bringing the total funding amount to $7.9 million. The latest round was led by the largest Dutch VC-firm, Inkef Capital with €500 million under management. The participation marked Inkef’s first investment in the developer tools market. “Wercker is core to modern cloud infrastructure and development, we’re excited to be part of its growth,”Robert Jan Galema of Inkef Capital said to StartupJuncture in an interview last year. Being ‘core’ of the modern cloud infrastructure is also what led Oracle to consider acquiring Wercker. Oracle states that the acquisition of Wercker fits in its strategy to build the leading IaaS and PaaS solutions to boost it’s cloud computing efforts. “A leading cloud needs great tooling and adding Wercker’s container lifecycle management to Oracle’s Cloud provides engineering teams with the developer experience they deserve to build, launch and scale their applications’, Oracle states in it’s announcement about the acquisition. Adding as the rational for the acquisition: “Wercker is the industry leading solution developers turn to for building and deploying cloud-native software. Together, we will democratise developer tooling for the modern cloud.” The deal made with Wercker also fits in the recent acquisition spree of Oracle in the fight for the cloud computing business against Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, IBM solutions and Google Cloud. Last year the company announced the acquisition of cloud-based Internet performance and DNS provider Dyn and closed its acquisition of NetSuite for $9.3 bilion. In January it announced the acquisition API platform and Apiary. Wecker was previously part of the incubator program Rockstart Accelerator in Amsterdam. It participated in the Mozilla WebFWD program and won the Salesforce Innovation Challenge. It also won the Gigaom Structure: Europe Launchpad competition, receiving both the People’s Choice and Judge’s awards.


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.cnet.com

With fake news having set up shop across the internet, Google wants to make it harder to find and spread hoaxes. Google announced Tuesday that it's changing how its search engine works to "surface more high quality content from the web." The search engine giant said that about 0.25 percent of its results had "offensive or clearly misleading content," and it set out to fix that by changing how results are ranked and introducing reporting tools for users. Over the last month, after Google updated its search quality guidelines, it used testers to weed out low-quality content, which included fake news, offensive results and bogus conspiracy theories. The search giant collected the data from the evaluators and is applying it to the ranking algorithm to push fake news further down in search results. Google said its improved algorithm would prevent incidents like Holocaust deniers popping up if you search "did the Holocaust happen," which occurred in December. The search engine's algorithm has caused Google plenty of headaches in the past, with autocomplete giving offensive suggestions about women, Muslims and Jews. It's also lost lawsuits in Japan and Germany over the search suggestions. "The content that appears in these features is generated algorithmically and is a reflection of what people are searching for and what's available on the web," Google Search's vice president of engineering, Ben Gomes, said in a blog post. "This can sometimes lead to results that are unexpected, inaccurate or offensive." The company is now allowing users to flag results that are offensive or unhelpful, in both the autocomplete suggestions and the featured results. Google joins internet giants like Facebook, Mozilla and Wikipedia in the web's uphill battle against fake news. CNET Magazine: Check out a sampling of the stories you'll find in CNET's newsstand edition. Solving for XX: The industry seeks to overcome outdated ideas about "women in tech."


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: motherboard.vice.com

In March, Wikileaks started publishing alleged CIA documents concerning the agency's hacking operations and capabilities. Wikileaks also said it had obtained details of vulnerabilities CIA hackers took advantage of, and offered to provide these to affected vendors so the issues could be fixed. Firefox maker Mozilla was one of those vendors, but as it now turns out, Mozilla says it had already patched Firefox attacks related to those provided by Wikileaks—the organization had previously fixed the issues in earlier versions of the web browser. "Wikileaks sent us three javascript files in a directory called 'stackup.0'," Daniel Veditz, security lead at Mozilla, writes in Bugzilla, a system for tracking the progress of dealing with bugs, a month ago. "Note that the Wikileaks dump might be old," he continues. As the thread develops, others chime in, saying the attack is taking advantage of the same vulnerability as a previously documented attack. "I am satisfied that this is just bug 983344 again," Steve Fink from Mozilla writes. That specific vulnerability was reported three years ago, and according to another post from Veditz, came from Pwn2Own 2014. Pwn2Own is an annual competition for bug hunters and exploit developers; winners are paid for their discoveries, and the conference organizers provide details of the attacks to vendors so the problems can be patched. Another thread also attributes the second attack to the same bug, and a third apparently will not work because a necessary setting was removed from Firefox 21 (the latest version is 53). A Mozilla spokesperson told Motherboard in an email that Mozilla had received one report from Wikileaks that described three potential security vulnerabilities. "We have completed our analysis of these vulnerabilities and determined that these issues were fixed in November 2012 and March 2014. Current versions of Firefox are not at risk," the spokesperson said. "When we receive information, regardless of the source, about anything that needs to be patched, we will take the necessary steps to remedy and will follow our published notification procedures." Read more: Wikileaks Just Dumped a Cache of Information on Alleged CIA Hacking Tools Mozilla did not respond to follow up questions on whether it had to sign some sort of agreement with Wikileaks in order to receive the vulnerability details, as a previous Motherboard report suggested. Wikileaks has attempted to provide vulnerability information to Microsoft, Apple, and Google. The status of those disclosures remains unclear. Wikileaks did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Even if the issues were already fixed, these details did at least give researchers a chance to see what alleged CIA hacker code looks like. "The code is remarkably clear and well-commented; I wish our own code was up to its standard more often!" Fink writes. Subscribe to Science Solved It, Motherboard's new show about the greatest mysteries that were solved by science.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Here’s a challenge for you: you click on a link in your email, and find yourself at the website https://аррӏе.com. Your browser shows the green padlock icon, confirming it’s a secure connection; and it says “Secure” next to it, for added reassurance. And yet, you’ve been phished. Do you know how? The answer is in that URL. It may look like it reads “apple”, but that’s actually a bunch of Cyrillic characters: A, Er, Er, Palochka, Ie. The security certificate is real enough, but all it confirms is that you have a secure connection to аррӏе.com – which tells you nothing about whether you’re connected to a legitimate site or not. The proof-of-concept domain was put together by Xudong Zheng, a security researcher who wanted to demonstrate the problem with the way domain names can be registered and displayed. For a long time, domain names could only be written in Latin characters without diacritics, but since 1998 it’s actually been possible to write them in other alphabets too. That’s useful if you want to register a domain name in Chinese or Arabic script, or even just correctly spelled French or German – anything that can be represented with the Unicode standard can be registered, even emoji – but it’s also opened up a whole new avenue of misdirection for malicious actors to take advantage of, by finding characters in other alphabets which look similar to Latin ones. “From a security perspective, Unicode domains can be problematic because many Unicode characters are difficult to distinguish from common ASCII characters,” Zheng writes. “It is possible to register domains such as ‘xn--pple-43d.com’, which is equivalent to ‘аpple.com’. It may not be obvious at first glance, but ‘аpple.com’ uses the Cyrillic ‘а’ (U+0430) rather than the ASCII “a” (U+0041). This is known as a homograph attack.” Some browsers will keep an eye out for such tricks, and display the underlying domain name if they sense mischief. A common approach is to reject any domain name containing multiple alphabets. But that doesn’t work if the whole thing is written in the same alphabet. Apple’s Safari and Microsoft’s Edge both still spot that Zheng’s spoof domain is a fraud, but Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox don’t, instead displaying the Cyrillic domain name. And though it may be obvious in the Guardian’s font that something’s up, the sans serif typeface used as standard by those browsers leave the two indistinguishable. Zheng says: “This bug was reported to Chrome and Firefox on January 20, 2017…The Chrome team has since decided to include the fix in Chrome 58, which should be available around April 25.” Mozilla, however, declined to fix it, arguing that it’s Apple’s problem to solve: “it is sadly the responsibility of domain owners to check for whole-script homographs and register them”. Google didn’t comment beyond referring to Zheng’s blogpost, and Mozilla didn’t comment at publication time but a spokesperson later said: “We continue to investigate ways to further address visual spoofing attacks, which are complex to fix with technology just in the browser alone.” Itsik Mantin, director of security research at Imperva, said that common advice to web users falls down when such simple attacks work. “In order to protect website users, forcing them to use strong passwords and to replace them frequently is insufficient, since in this case it would be completely ineffective to prevent the attack. Instead, he said, a better approach begins by assuming that phishing attacks will succeed: “Site administrators should assume that the credentials of some of their users were stolen (which in almost 100% of the cases will be true), and take adequate measures to identify account takeover, like irregular device, irregular geo-location or abnormal activity in the account.” Zheng himself offers advice to users: use a password manager, and try and spot phishing attacks before you click on any links. “In general, users must be very careful and pay attention to the URL when entering personal information. Until this is fixed, users should manually type the URL or navigate to the site via a search engine when in doubt.”


News Article | March 23, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Many of us have been using Orange/Freeserve/Wanadoo email accounts since they were introduced about 20 years ago. Now BT/EE plans to shut them down at the end of May 2017. Many businesses were built on the back of these addresses, and large investments made using their contact information in brochures, product literature, business cards, letterheads etc. Having started to work out a migration plan, I realise I shall have to invest a substantial amount of time and money to move to a new email address. I also need a new account that allows me to download, archive and work offline with a suitable email client. Is there any way that these email addresses can be kept operational? If not, what do you recommend? Duncan Dixons launched Freeserve in 1998, and it was subsumed into France Télécom’s Wanadoo in 2000. Then France Télécom bought Orange UK, and changed its branding to Orange SA. In 2010, Orange UK merged with Deutsche Telekom’s T-Mobile UK to become EE (Everything Everywhere). Finally, BT bought EE for £12.5bn, completing the deal in January 2016. According to EE’s announcement, Orange Email Closure, it is killing off a long list of email addresses. These include Orange.net, Orangehome.co.uk, Wanadoo.co.uk, Freeserve.co.uk, Fsbusiness.co.uk, Fslife.co.uk, Fsmail.net, Fsworld.co.uk and Fsnet.co.uk. EE adds: “We haven’t given Orange email addresses to new customers since 2012.” It would certainly be possible for BT/EE to provide a forwarding service so that you could retrieve your emails from a different email service. However, it’s time to move on. First, these mail addresses already look “spammy”, and your emails may be blocked. Second, using very old free email addresses – Hotmail, Yahoo, Freeserve, Wanadoo etc – does not create a good impression for your business. It’s a minor miracle that Orange/Freeserve/Wanadoo email accounts have lasted so long, but it has enabled you to avoid the action you should have taken in 2005-07. That is, moving to Google’s Gmail, which was launched on 1 April 2004. You could have had a much better email service a decade sooner. You will never have to change your email address if you own it, so buy a domain name from one of the many providers. I’ve used Easily.co.uk for a long time, but readers will no doubt suggest their current favourites in the comments below. NameCheap and Godaddy are well known options. Work out your preferred name or keyword in advance then search for it. Almost all the best domains (.com, .co.uk etc) will already have gone. However, there are now dozens of weird and sometimes wonderful options such as .biz, .shop, .guru, .Tokyo and .xyz, so one may be suitable for your business. If you can’t get .com or .co.uk, I’d go for something short like .uk, .me or even .biz. You could get a .uk name from Easily for 10 years for £81.40, or .me or .biz for £79.99. Bad luck if you want .accountants because that costs £799.90 for 10 years. Once you own the name, you can point it to whichever email service you like. If that email service goes out of business or locks you out of your mailbox, you can point it to a different email service. I answered this question more fully in 2010, in advising readers to solve email problems forever by setting up Gmail with your own domain. Unfortunately, Google stopped supporting personal domain names in its free service, but you can do it with a Google Apps account for £3.30 per month. Google also offers a business service for £6.60 per user per month. You could do the same thing with Microsoft’s Office 365 for Business for a little more money. This has the advantage of providing Microsoft Office (including Microsoft Outlook) on up to five PCs or Macs. Outlook (the software) works well with Outlook.com (the email service). If you are going to pay for email, you should also consider Fastmail. It respects your privacy, doesn’t show any adverts, and includes good support. Fastmail offers dozens of addresses – fastmail.co.uk, ftml.net, elitemail.org, fea.st, sent.as etc – but you can also use your own domain name. It costs $5 per month or $50 a year with 25GB of email storage. Having said all that, the number of email services has been reduced from thousands to dozens, and now there are only two free services that are worth joining: Google’s Gmail and Microsoft’s Outlook.com. I don’t think either company will go bust or stop offering email in the foreseeable future. If you sign up with both, you probably won’t need your own domain name, though it still looks better if you’re running a business. EE’s Orange Email Closure page provides a good guide to setting up a Gmail account and importing your old email into your new mailbox. There’s also a section on “How to set an away message using Orange Webmail”. This replies to emails with a message such as: “This email address is no longer in use. Please contact me at [your new email address]”. Gmail will collect email from your old mailbox for a month. After that, you could set your Orange/Freeserve/Wanadoo account to forward email to your new email address, until it stops working. The problem is Gmail will have all your emails, and Google can lock you out of your mailbox for some real or imagined crime. This week, for example, my Gmail account was “temporarily disabled” for “unusual usage”, ie deleting a lot of emails to stay inside the 15GB of storage that Gmail shares with Google Drive. Being locked out is a nightmare for people who use other Google services such as Google Analytics, Adsense, Adwords and Android phones, because the only sure ways to get back in are: 1. Know a senior Google employee. 2. Complain in a blog post that goes viral. My solution, many moons ago, was to open a parallel account at Outlook.com, get Microsoft to import all my Gmail, and then set up Gmail auto-forwarding. Anything that arrives in my Gmail inbox (which uses my own domain name) automatically gets sent to my Outlook.com address (which has never run out of storage space). If you use a desktop email program such as Microsoft Outlook or Mozilla Thunderbird, then this will provide a local backup of all your Gmail. Otherwise, download open source Gmvault to back up your Gmail to a local hard drive. Set it to sync your every night, after you’ve finished deleting the day’s junk. A key feature of Gmvault is that you can restore your old Gmail to a different Gmail account. Thanks to mail forwarding and auto-responders, you shouldn’t lose any email, and not many contacts. The real problem is that dozens if not hundreds of services are using your email address. This includes web-based services such as Amazon, Spotify, Facebook and Twitter, your banks and insurance companies, and possibly some utilities and government services. You’ll have to change the email addresses in all the ones you want to keep. Remember that if you are locked out of a service, or forget your password, the supplier will send the reset email to your old address. When your Orange/Freeserve/Wanadoo email address dies, it could take these other services with it. Happily, if you’ve been using a password manager, it will remember all the websites where you opened accounts. You’ll still have to log on to each one to update your email address, but the rest of us are sure to miss a few. And finally, you may be able to save some of your stationary with stickers and self-inking rubber stamps. Have you got a question? Email it to Ask.Jack@theguardian.com


News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: www.techradar.com

With webmail services like Gmail and Outlook offering easy email access and mobile apps for all your devices, does the humble email client still warrant a place on you desktop? If you use more than one email account - as most of us do - we say yes. This is particularly true if those accounts are with different providers, which would otherwise require you to have several browser tabs open at once. As well as aggregating all your messages in one convenient place, a good email client can add features like encryption and integration with calendars, RSS feeds and VoIP apps. Desktop clients can also store your mail locally, giving you access to archived messages when you're offline and providing a valuable backup. Here's our nomination for the best email client of 2016. Have we missed your favorite? What makes it stand out? Let us know in the comments below. The best email client, with support for a huge range of email providers, integrated chat, smart translation, and simple migration from other tools eM Client has been kicking around for nearly 10 years now, and its long development has enabled it to develop into the best email client for Windows. The free version is limited to non-commercial use and two email accounts, but otherwise it's identical to the paid-for edition. eM Client includes support for Gmail, Exchange, iCloud and Outlook.com, touch controls, fast searching and integrated calendaring and contacts. There's an integrated chat app too, with support for common standards such as Jabber and Google Chat, and it's a good alternative to heavyweight apps like Outlook. Review and where to download: eM Client A great-looking email client packed with features to supplement your messages Mailbird Free isn't just an email app – it's a whole communication platform to which you can add apps for scheduling, chatting, file syncing and teamworking. After downloading Mailbird you'll be treated to a 30-day trial of the Pro version, which is downgraded to the more limited Lite edition if you choose not to upgrade at the end of the month. There are no time restrictions on the free client. Free users miss out on features such as speed reading, email snoozing and quick previews of attachments, but Mailbird Lite is still an excellent choice. It supports up to three email accounts, is optimized for speed, and looks great to boot. Setup is simple; enter your email details and Mailbird Lite will find the necessary POP or IMAP settings automatically, then get to work importing your messages. It offers to connect with your Facebook account, so it can liven up your inbox with your contacts' profile photos, and can also link with Whatsapp, Google Calendar, free task manager , and teamworking app . Claws Mail isn't hard to use, but is best suited to more experienced users who want to get stuck into its custom mail filtering and support for an unlimited number of email accounts. Unlike the other free email clients here, Claws requires users to set up their POP3/IMAP settings manually. If you use Gmail, you may also need to adjust your Google account settings and grant access for potentially less safe applications - something you might well prefer to avoid. Unusually for a modern email client there's no option to send HTML messages - Claws is plaintext-only - but by omitting potentially unnecessary features, Claws can run at lightning speeds. Its search function is particularly good, and it's expandable via plugins too. It isn't the prettiest email app, but Claws is a great free choice if you value substance over style. It's also updated regularly, so bugs are stamped out quickly. A flexible open source email client from the team behind the superb Opera browser The developers of Opera have always considered email to be a key feature of any good browser, and have poured a great deal of effort into developing free email client Opera Mail. Its features include message templates - particularly handy for business use - message filtering and sorting, message sorting by type and a wide range of customisation options. The client also imports RSS feeds, making it a good alternative to web apps like Feedly and the much-missed Google Reader. Plenty of features, with more available as extensions – as you'd expect from Mozilla Like Firefox, free email client Mozilla Thunderbird was created by the Mozilla Foundation (though development of the two has since been uncoupled). Like the web browser, its features can be extended and enhanced with a huge range of third-party add-ons. Some of its excellent built-in features include the ability to link files that are too big to email and the ability to read RSS news feeds alongside your email. Setup is straightforward; as with most modern email clients, all you need are your usernames and passwords, and Thunderbird takes care of the rest.

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