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The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai , formerly the Mount Sinai School of Medicine , is an American medical school in the New York City borough of Manhattan in the state of New York. Chartered by Mount Sinai Hospital in 1963, the ISMMS is one of the foremost medical schools in the United States, ranking 19th in research according to U.S. News & World Report, 18th in NIH funding among U.S Medical Schools , and 3rd in NIH funding per primary investigator.ISMMS and the Mount Sinai Hospital occupy a four-block area adjacent to Central Park on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, with architecture designed by I. M. Pei. ISMMS and Mount Sinai Hospital comprise the Mount Sinai Medical Center, of which Kenneth L. Davis, MD, is the president and CEO.In 2012–13, The Mount Sinai Medical Center was recognized on the U.S. News & World Report "Best Hospitals Honor Roll," ranking 14th among the approximately 5000 hospitals in the US with 11 nationally ranked specialties including cancer, geriatrics, gastroenterology, cardiology & heart surgery, otolaryngology, rehabilitation, diabetes & endocrinology, neurology & neurosurgery, gynecology, urology, and kidney disorders. Wikipedia.


Sicherer S.H.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology | Year: 2011

Adverse reactions to foods can occur for a variety of reasons, but a food allergy is caused by a specific immune response. Challenges to determine the prevalence of food allergy include misclassification, biased participation, lack of simple diagnostic tests, rapid evolution of disease, large numbers of potential triggers, and varied clinical phenotypes. Nonetheless, it is clear that this is a common disorder, with studies suggesting a cumulative prevalence of 3% to 6%, representing a significant impact on quality of life and costs. The inclusion of mild reactions to fruits and vegetables could result in calculation of prevalence exceeding 10% in some regions. There are data from numerous studies to suggest an increase in prevalence, but methodologic concerns warrant caution. Prevalence varies by age, geographic location, and possibly race/ethnicity. Many childhood food allergies resolve. Population-based epidemiologic studies have generated numerous novel theories regarding risks, including modifiable factors such as components of the maternal and infant diet, obesity, and the timing of food introduction. Recent and ongoing studies provide insights on risk factors, prevalence, and natural course that may inform clinical trials to improve diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. © 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.


Golden S.A.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Nature protocols | Year: 2011

A major impediment to novel drug development has been the paucity of animal models that accurately reflect symptoms of affective disorders. In animal models, prolonged social stress has proven to be useful in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying affective-like disorders. When considering experimental approaches for studying depression, social defeat stress, in particular, has been shown to have excellent etiological, predictive, discriminative and face validity. Described here is a protocol whereby C57BL/6J mice that are repeatedly subjected to bouts of social defeat by a larger and aggressive CD-1 mouse results in the development of a clear depressive-like syndrome, characterized by enduring deficits in social interactions. Specifically, the protocol consists of three important stages, beginning with the selection of aggressive CD-1 mice, followed by agonistic social confrontations between the CD-1 and C57BL/6J mice, and concluding with the confirmation of social avoidance in subordinate C57BL/6J mice. The automated detection of social avoidance allows a marked increase in throughput, reproducibility and quantitative analysis. This protocol is highly adaptable, but in its most common form it requires 3-4 weeks for completion.


Medina R.A.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Nature communications | Year: 2010

The 1918 influenza A virus caused the most devastating pandemic, killing approximately 50 million people worldwide. Immunization with 1918-like and classical swine H1N1 virus vaccines results in cross-protective antibodies against the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza, indicating antigenic similarities among these viruses. In this study, we demonstrate that vaccination with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccine elicits 1918 virus cross-protective antibodies in mice and humans, and that vaccination or passive transfer of human-positive sera reduced morbidity and conferred full protection from lethal challenge with the 1918 virus in mice. The spread of the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus in the population worldwide, in addition to the large number of individuals already vaccinated, suggests that a large proportion of the population now have cross-protective antibodies against the 1918 virus, greatly alleviating concerns and fears regarding the accidental exposure/release of the 1918 virus from the laboratory and the use of the virus as a bioterrorist agent.


Sampson H.A.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice | Year: 2013

The prevalence of peanut allergy in the United States and other Westernized countries has tripled in the past 15 years, now affecting more than 1% of the population. Strict peanut avoidance is the current standard of care. In the past decade, a number of small, largely uncontrolled clinical trials have suggested that oral immunotherapy (OIT) can effectively desensitize most children with peanut allergy. Some in the allergy community now feel that OIT is ready for clinical practice. In this review, the evidence base in the medical literature is examined. Although peanut OIT shows promise, the evidence currently available on its effectiveness, risk benefit, and potential long-term consequences is insufficient to support its use in clinical practice. Appropriately designed, prospective clinical trials are urgently needed to determine whether OIT is a safe, effective form of therapy for food allergy. © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.


Blander J.M.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Nature Reviews Immunology | Year: 2014

Historically, cell death and inflammation have been closely linked, but the necessary divergence of the fields in the past few decades has enriched our molecular understanding of the signalling pathways that mediate various programmes of cell death and multiple types of inflammatory responses. The fields have now come together again demonstrating a surprising level of integration. Intimate interconnections at multiple levels are revealed between the cell death and inflammatory signal transduction pathways that are mobilized in response to the engagement of pattern recognition receptors during microbial infection. Molecules such as receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1), RIPK3, FAS-associated death domain protein (FADD), FLICE-like inhibitory protein (FLIP) and caspase 8-which are associated with different forms of cell death-are incorporated into compatible and exceedingly dynamic Toll-like receptor, NOD-like receptor and RIG-I-like receptor signalling modules. These signalling modules have a high capacity to switch from inflammation to cell death, or a programmed execution of both, all in an orchestrated battle for host defence and survival. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

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