The Mount Sinai Hospital

Mount Sinai, NY, United States

The Mount Sinai Hospital

Mount Sinai, NY, United States
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News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Epilepsy patients who experience three or more generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) per year have a significantly increased risk of sudden, unexpected death, according to new guidelines presented at the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Annual Meeting on April 24. The guidelines, co-developed by the AAN and the American Epilepsy Society, state that epilepsy patients who experience frequent GTCS—a type of seizure that involves a loss of consciousness and violent muscle contractions—are 15 times more likely to experience unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) than those who experience few or no GTCS. This risk is increased for adults, with one in 4,500 children and one in every 1,000 adults dying unexpectedly from epilepsy. This translates to up to 18 in 1,000 deaths per year for people with frequent GTCS. While this phenomenon is relatively rare, it is still important that healthcare professionals talk to their patients with epilepsy about the risk of SUDEP and the importance of managing frequent GTCS, said Cynthia L. Harden, M.D, lead author of the guideline and a professor of neurology at The Mount Sinai Hospital. “The guideline shows that being free of seizures, particularly tonic-clonic seizures, is strongly associated with decreased risk,” said Harden during an AAN Annual Meeting press conference on the guidelines. “Educating health professionals and people with epilepsy about SUDEP is an important first step.” The guideline’s outline steps that health professionals and patients should take to reduce their risk of SUDEP. For patients with epilepsy who continue to experience GTCS, the guidelines recommend  clinicians should continue to actively manage epilepsy therapies to reduce seizure occurrences and the risk of SUDEP, while incorporating patient preferences and weighing the risks and benefits of any new approach. Healthcare professionals need to stress the importance of adhering to medication and learning to manage seizure triggers with their patients, said Elizabeth Donner, M.D., co-author of the guidelines, associate professor at the University of Toronto and pediatric neurologist at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. “People need to understand that the risk of generalized tonic-clonic seizures is not only related to maintaining a driver’s license, maintaining work or other things like that, it’s actually related to risk of death,” said Donner at the AAN press event. “Further, I would hope that this can be a motivator to pursue treatments beyond medications when medications are not successful at treating seizures. “We know that for a certain population of people living with epilepsy, medication, which is our first approach, does not work. In those cases, we need people to feel safe and motivated to work with their healthcare team to find other treatments, like surgery and other approaches to managing seizures” The guidelines also state  unwitnessed seizures that occur at night may increase the risk of unexpected death from epilepsy. For patients with frequent GTCS and nocturnal seizures, some patients and families may want to consider having a secondary person present in the bedroom during sleep or using a remote listening device to reduce SUDEP risk. Both Harden and Donner stated these guidelines are not meant to scare patients, but  that most patients or families of patients with epilepsy want to be informed of factors that are associated with an increased risk of a catastrophic event such as SUDEP. It is a doctor’s responsibility to make sure their patients and families are getting information from them about risks, and not from other sources, said Donner. “I see parents that have seen their children have a particularly convulsive, body shaking-seizure and are terrified,” said Donner. “For most of these parents it has run through their head that their child could die from this. They have looked it up, they have Googled it, and it is almost the elephant in the room. “So it is not difficult to talk about the risk of death associated with an illness when people are already thinking about it. In fact, if we as health care practitioners don’t share high quality information with people, they will find other information from other sources. When someone comes to see their health care practitioner, they really need to get information about their disorder in its entirety.”


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Epilepsy patients who experience three or more generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) per year have a significantly increased risk of sudden, unexpected death, according to new guidelines presented at the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Annual Meeting on April 24. The guidelines, co-developed by the AAN and the American Epilepsy Society, state that epilepsy patients who experience frequent GTCS—a type of seizure that involves a loss of consciousness and violent muscle contractions—are 15 times more likely to experience unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) than those who experience few or no GTCS. This risk is increased for adults, with one in 4,500 children and one in every 1,000 adults dying unexpectedly from epilepsy. This translates to up to 18 in 1,000 deaths per year for people with frequent GTCS. While this phenomenon is relatively rare, it is still important that healthcare professionals talk to their patients with epilepsy about the risk of SUDEP and the importance of managing frequent GTCS, said Cynthia L. Harden, M.D, lead author of the guideline and a professor of neurology at The Mount Sinai Hospital. “The guideline shows that being free of seizures, particularly tonic-clonic seizures, is strongly associated with decreased risk,” said Harden during an AAN Annual Meeting press conference on the guidelines. “Educating health professionals and people with epilepsy about SUDEP is an important first step.” The guideline’s outline steps that health professionals and patients should take to reduce their risk of SUDEP. For patients with epilepsy who continue to experience GTCS, the guidelines recommend  clinicians should continue to actively manage epilepsy therapies to reduce seizure occurrences and the risk of SUDEP, while incorporating patient preferences and weighing the risks and benefits of any new approach. Healthcare professionals need to stress the importance of adhering to medication and learning to manage seizure triggers with their patients, said Elizabeth Donner, M.D., co-author of the guidelines, associate professor at the University of Toronto and pediatric neurologist at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. “People need to understand that the risk of generalized tonic-clonic seizures is not only related to maintaining a driver’s license, maintaining work or other things like that, it’s actually related to risk of death,” said Donner at the AAN press event. “Further, I would hope that this can be a motivator to pursue treatments beyond medications when medications are not successful at treating seizures. “We know that for a certain population of people living with epilepsy, medication, which is our first approach, does not work. In those cases, we need people to feel safe and motivated to work with their healthcare team to find other treatments, like surgery and other approaches to managing seizures” The guidelines also state  unwitnessed seizures that occur at night may increase the risk of unexpected death from epilepsy. For patients with frequent GTCS and nocturnal seizures, some patients and families may want to consider having a secondary person present in the bedroom during sleep or using a remote listening device to reduce SUDEP risk. Both Harden and Donner stated these guidelines are not meant to scare patients, but  that most patients or families of patients with epilepsy want to be informed of factors that are associated with an increased risk of a catastrophic event such as SUDEP. It is a doctor’s responsibility to make sure their patients and families are getting information from them about risks, and not from other sources, said Donner. “I see parents that have seen their children have a particularly convulsive, body shaking-seizure and are terrified,” said Donner. “For most of these parents it has run through their head that their child could die from this. They have looked it up, they have Googled it, and it is almost the elephant in the room. “So it is not difficult to talk about the risk of death associated with an illness when people are already thinking about it. In fact, if we as health care practitioners don’t share high quality information with people, they will find other information from other sources. When someone comes to see their health care practitioner, they really need to get information about their disorder in its entirety.”


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

(NEW YORK -- May 17, 2017) Biomarkers in the teeth of wild orangutans indicate nursing patterns related to food fluctuations in their habitats, which can help guide understanding of breast-feeding evolution in humans, according to a study published today in Science Advances. This work was led by researchers in the Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and evolutionary biologists at Griffith University in Australia. Breast-feeding is a critical aspect of human development, and the duration of exclusive nursing and timing of introducing solid food to the diet are also important determinants of health in human and other primate populations. Many aspects of nursing, however, remain poorly understood. Orangutan nursing habits have also been difficult to study due to challenges in observing this behavior in their natural environment. To work around these challenges, researchers reconstructed diet histories of wild orangutans by using their teeth as biomarkers. The growth patterns of teeth, which resemble tree rings, allows investigators to determine concentrations of the maternal elements in the infants' teeth over time, which yields information about their nursing and dietary patterns. "Early-life dietary transitions reflect fundamental aspects of primate life, history, and evolution," said Christine Austin, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health and second study author. "By first studying nursing patterns of our primate cousins, we can apply these findings to future studies in humans. This method can be used to reconstruct the diet histories of contemporary humans in order to reliably and accurately study the relationship between infant diet and health outcomes in childhood or later life, as well as inform models of population growth." In this study, the researchers examined levels of the element barium in teeth samples from deceased Sumatran and Bornean orangutans housed in zoological museums. Teeth analyses showed that the orangutans consumed maternal milk exclusively for their first year, as determined by a gradual increase in barium levels over the first 12 months. After the first year, the teeth indicated cycles that alternated between more and less milk consumption, which may occur until eight to nine years of age, a later weaning age than any other primate. This cycling is believed to result from the changing and unpredictable availability of fruit, which leads young orangutans to rely on maternal milk for a longer period of time. "The evidence of cyclical multi-year nursing patterns and late weaning ages in orangutans, reported here for the first time, will lead to further studies of how food availability and other environmental factors affect nursing patterns in primates," said Tanya Smith, PhD, Associate Professor at Griffith University and lead study author. "Additional research is needed to determine whether similar breast-feeding patterns help human babies increase resilience to environmental stressors in infancy." For more information on exposure biology research at Mount Sinai, please visit http://labs. . The Mount Sinai Health System is an integrated health system committed to providing distinguished care, conducting transformative research, and advancing biomedical education. Structured around seven hospital campuses and a single medical school, the Health System has an extensive ambulatory network and a range of inpatient and outpatient services--from community-based facilities to tertiary and quaternary care. The System includes approximately 7,100 primary and specialty care physicians; 12 joint-venture ambulatory surgery centers; more than 140 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and 31 affiliated community health centers. Physicians are affiliated with the renowned Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, which is ranked among the highest in the nation in National Institutes of Health funding per investigator. The Mount Sinai Hospital is in the "Honor Roll" of best hospitals in America, ranked No. 15 nationally in the 2016-2017 "Best Hospitals" issue of U.S. News & World Report. The Mount Sinai Hospital is also ranked as one of the nation's top 20 hospitals in Geriatrics, Gastroenterology/GI Surgery, Cardiology/Heart Surgery, Diabetes/Endocrinology, Nephrology, Neurology/Neurosurgery, and Ear, Nose & Throat, and is in the top 50 in four other specialties. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked No. 10 nationally for Ophthalmology, while Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Mount Sinai St. Luke's, and Mount Sinai West are ranked regionally. Mount Sinai's Kravis Children's Hospital is ranked in seven out of ten pediatric specialties by U.S. News & World Report in "Best Children's Hospitals." For more information, visit http://www. , or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

(New York - May 5, 2017) - Much is known about flu viruses, but little is understood about how they reproduce inside human host cells, spreading infection. Now, a research team headed by investigators from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is the first to identify a mechanism by which influenza A, a family of pathogens that includes the most deadly strains of flu worldwide, hijacks cellular machinery to replicate. The study findings, published online today in Cell, also identifies a link between congenital defects in that machinery -- the RNA exosome -- and the neurodegeneration that results in people who have that rare mutation. It was by studying the cells of patients with an RNA exosome mutation, which were contributed by six collaborating medical centers, that the investigators were able to understand how influenza A hijacks the RNA exosome inside a cell's nucleus for its own purposes. "This study shows how we can discover genes linked to disease -- in this case, neurodegeneration -- by looking at the natural symbiosis between a host and a pathogen," says the study's senior investigator, Ivan Marazzi, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Microbiology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Influenza A is responsible in part not only for seasonal flus but also pandemics such as H1N1 and other flus that cross from mammals (such as swine) or birds into humans. "We are all a result of co-evolution with viruses, bacteria, and other microbes, but when this process is interrupted, which we call the broken symmetry hypothesis, disease can result," Dr. Marazzi says. The genes affected in these rare cases of neurodegeneration caused by a congenital RNA exosome mutation may offer future insight into more common brain disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, he added. In the case of Influenza A, the loss of RNA exosome activity severely compromises viral infectivity, but also manifests in human neurodegeneration suggesting that viruses target essential proteins implicated in rare disease in order to ensure continual adaptation. Influenza A is an RNA virus, meaning that it reproduces itself inside the nucleus. Most viruses replicate in a cell's cytoplasm, outside the nucleus. The researchers found that once inside the nucleus, influenza A hijacks the RNA exosome, an essential protein complex that degrades RNA as a way to regulate gene expression. The flu pathogen needs extra RNA to start the replication process so it steals these molecules from the hijacked exosome, Dr. Marazzi says. "Viruses have a very intelligent way of not messing too much with our own biology," he says. "It makes use of our by-products, so rather than allowing the exosome to chew up and degrade excess RNA, it tags the exosome and steals the RNA it needs before it is destroyed. "Without an RNA exosome, a virus cannot grow, so the agreement between the virus and host is that it is ok for the virus to use some of the host RNA because the host has other ways to suppress the virus that is replicated," says the study's lead author, Alex Rialdi, MPH, a graduate assistant in Dr. Marazzi's laboratory. Co-authors include investigators from the University of California-San Francisco, Columbia University, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Regeneron Genetics Center, Burnham Institute for Medical Research, and the University of California-Los Angeles. The study was supported by NIH grants 2RO1AI099195 and DP2 2OD008651 (U.B.), and partially supported by HHSN272201400008C - Center for Research on Influenza Pathogenesis (CRIP) a NIAID-funded Center of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance (A.G.S, H.v.B., R.A., and I.M.). Other support includes the Department of Defense W911NF-14-1-0353 (to I.M.) NIH grant 1R56AI114770-01A1 (to I. M.), NIH grant 1R01AN3663134 (I.M. and H.v.B), and NIH grant U19AI106754 FLUOMICS (I.M., R.A., S.C., N.K., A.G.S.). The Mount Sinai Health System is an integrated health system committed to providing distinguished care, conducting transformative research, and advancing biomedical education. Structured around seven hospital campuses and a single medical school, the Health System has an extensive ambulatory network and a range of inpatient and outpatient services -- from community-based facilities to tertiary and quaternary care. The System includes approximately 7,100 primary and specialty care physicians; 12 joint-venture ambulatory surgery centers; more than 140 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and 31 affiliated community health centers. Physicians are affiliated with the renowned Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, which is ranked among the highest in the nation in National Institutes of Health funding per investigator. The Mount Sinai Hospital is in the "Honor Roll" of best hospitals in America, ranked No. 15 nationally in the 2016-2017 "Best Hospitals" issue of U.S. News & World Report. The Mount Sinai Hospital is also ranked as one of the nation's top 20 hospitals in Geriatrics, Gastroenterology/GI Surgery, Cardiology/Heart Surgery, Diabetes/Endocrinology, Nephrology, Neurology/Neurosurgery, and Ear, Nose & Throat, and is in the top 50 in four other specialties. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked No. 10 nationally for Ophthalmology, while Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Mount Sinai St. Luke's, and Mount Sinai West are ranked regionally. Mount Sinai's Kravis Children's Hospital is ranked in seven out of ten pediatric specialties by U.S. News & World Report in "Best Children's Hospitals." For more information, visit http://www. , or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

(New York, NY - May 4, 2017) -- Immunotherapy, which has achieved remarkable results in late-stage lung cancer patients, can also hold great hope for newly diagnosed patients, cutting the deadly disease off before it has the chance to take hold and offering a potential cure, according to a new Mount Sinai study published today in Cell. Researchers at The Tisch Cancer Institute at Mount Sinai discovered that some of the same immune cells that allow immunotherapy to turn around some late-stage lung cancers are also present just as the disease takes hold. Before now, little was known about the immune response in early lung cancer, said Miriam Merad, MD, PhD, Professor of Oncological Sciences and of Medicine (Hematology and Medical Oncology) at The Tisch Cancer Institute at Mount Sinai. Dr. Merad and a multidisciplinary team of thoracic surgeons, pathologists, and scientists devised a comprehensive study that began when patients went into surgery to have cancerous lesions removed. The patients' lung tumor samples, samples of surrounding healthy lung tissue, and blood samples were immediately analyzed on a cellular level to map out the immune system components present. The team of researchers crafted a barcoding method that attaches cells in each sample to a different metal isotope, allowing the samples to be pooled for a simultaneous analysis of cells from all three tissue types. The scientists combined this barcoding approach with high-dimensional profiling to map the complete immune landscape to search for tumor-driven changes that would be vulnerable to targeted immunotherapy. The analysis of the samples showed that stage I lung cancer lesions already harbor immune system components that likely compromise anti-tumor T cells' ability to fend off cancer. These single-cell analyses offered unprecedented detail of tumor-driven immune changes, providing a powerful tool for the future design of immunotherapies such as checkpoint inhibitors, particularly those that target the PD-1 and PD-L1 proteins that shield cancer from the immune system; these checkpoint inhibitors have shown great promise in later-stage cancers. "Immunotherapy has mostly been used in advanced or metastatic lung cancer, but its benefit in early-stage tumors remains unknown," Dr. Merad said. "The standard treatment for early lung cancer is normally surgical removal of the lesions--sometimes with chemotherapy and radiation. Our study reveals that early lung lesions are heavily infiltrated with many different immune cells, suggesting that immunotherapy could also work on very early lesions and potentially lead to a cure by heading cancer off at the pass before it really takes root in the lungs." This new research also identified a multitude of additional immunotherapy targets to increase the number of patients that would significantly benefit from immunotherapy, which at the moment remains fairly small. This research is being used to develop immunotherapy trials with early lung cancer patients. "About 50 percent of patients with small lung cancer lesions relapse," Merad said. "And when lung cancer is advanced, chemotherapy does not have a great success rate, so knowing how to attack the cancer at an early stage could have huge impacts on the number of patients relapsing and their overall survival. Our research further corroborates the belief that immunotherapy agents are most efficient at early stages of cancer, particularly in patients who have never been treated with chemotherapy." Raja M. Flores, MD, Chair of the Department of Thoracic Surgery at Mount Sinai Health System, and his team contributed significantly to the study by identifying patients and providing their tissue samples. Mount Sinai's Human Immune Monitoring Center (HIMC) also played an integral role, by providing a platform to analyze patient samples using quality control assays and cutting-edge technology. Through the HIMC, Dr. Merad plans to build a portal to share the results of this study and of other HIMC research to collaborate with colleagues at other cancer centers in the hopes of promoting further cancer and immunology research. This study was funded by Foundation pour la Recherche Medicale DEA20150633125 and NIH grants R01, R01 CA173861, U19AI128949, U24 AI 118644, U19 AI 117873-01. The Mount Sinai Health System is an integrated health system committed to providing distinguished care, conducting transformative research, and advancing biomedical education. Structured around seven hospital campuses and a single medical school, the Health System has an extensive ambulatory network and a range of inpatient and outpatient services--from community-based facilities to tertiary and quaternary care. The System includes approximately 7,100 primary and specialty care physicians; 12 joint-venture ambulatory surgery centers; more than 140 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and 31 affiliated community health centers. Physicians are affiliated with the renowned Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, which is ranked among the highest in the nation in National Institutes of Health funding per investigator. The Mount Sinai Hospital is on the "Honor Roll" of best hospitals in America, ranked No. 15 nationally in the 2016-2017 "Best Hospitals" issue of U.S. News & World Report. The Mount Sinai Hospital is also ranked as one of the nation's top 20 hospitals in Geriatrics, Gastroenterology/GI Surgery, Cardiology/Heart Surgery, Diabetes/Endocrinology, Nephrology, Neurology/Neurosurgery, and Ear, Nose & Throat, and is in the top 50 in four other specialties. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked No. 10 nationally for Ophthalmology, while Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Mount Sinai St. Luke's, and Mount Sinai West are ranked regionally. Mount Sinai's Kravis Children's Hospital is ranked in seven out of ten pediatric specialties by U.S. News & World Report in "Best Children's Hospitals." For more information, visit http://www. or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.


Researchers comparing leading treatment approaches for patients with severe uveitis have discovered that systemic therapy with oral corticosteroids and immunosuppression can preserve or improve vision in the long term better than regional implant therapy can. The results, published in the May 6, 2017 issue of JAMA, should reassure physicians about the relative safety of this approach, and may lead ophthalmologists to change their treatment protocol for better and safer outcomes. Douglas Jabs, MD, MBA, Director of the Eye and Vision Research Institute, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, and Professor of Ophthalmology and Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, chaired an international team of researchers as they examined the long-term effects of two treatment approaches for patients with vision-threatening uveitis. Uveitis, the fifth leading cause of vision loss in the United States, is a collection of more than 30 diseases characterized by inflammation inside the eye that damages the tissues; without appropriate treatment, it will often lead to visual impairment or blindness. For more severe cases, treatment generally calls for taking oral corticosteroid and immunosuppressive medications. The alternative is regional therapy, either with repetitive corticosteroid injections or with a surgically placed fluocinolone acetonide implant that releases corticosteroid medication over three years. Since most of the more severe uveitis cases are chronic, long-term therapy is typically needed. The Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment (MUST) Trial Follow-up Study followed 215 patients from the original MUST Trial for seven years. The MUST Trial and Follow-up Study were conducted at 21 medical centers across the United States, along with two sites in the United Kingdom and Australia. Patients in the Trial had been randomized to receive either systemic treatment with oral corticosteroids and immunosuppression or regional therapy with the fluocinolone acetonide implant. At the seven-year mark, the findings showed that patients taking oral medications had better vision on average, compared to those in the implant group. The results differ from the initial MUST Trial findings and from the earlier five-year results of the MUST Follow-up Study, in which the same patients had similar visual outcomes at both time points. The MUST Trial and Follow-up Study also showed that there was no significant increase in the risks of systemic side effects for the systemic therapy group compared to implant therapy, with one exception: patients in the systemic group were more likely to receive antibiotics for infections. These outcomes suggest that systemic treatment, if used properly, may be given relatively safely for up to seven years. "The implication of these data is that oral corticosteroids and immunosuppression may be a preferable initial choice for therapy of the more severe uveitides," explained Dr. Jabs. "They have better visual outcomes long-term, fewer ocular side effects, and no apparent significant increase in the risk of systemic side effects, except for the greater use of antibiotics." While the large majority of both groups maintained good vision at the end of seven years, some patients with the fluocinolone acetonide implant did worse in terms of visual acuity. Results of the follow-up study show vision loss occurred more often in the implant group due to damage from inflammatory lesions in the back of the eye, which occurred at the time of relapse of the uveitis. Even though the implant is designed to release corticosteroid medication for three years, the study found that the benefit lasted approximately five years, with relapses beginning at that time. Relapses can be treated with an implant exchange or by switching to systemic therapy. "Although both treatment approaches control the inflammation in the large majority of patients, for the first five years the implant was better than systemic therapy at controlling inflammation. Hence it has value for those patients where systemic therapy cannot control the inflammation or for those patients who cannot tolerate the oral medications," said Dr. Jabs. He notes the implant has an important role to play in the management of these diseases. "The visual loss that occurred in the implant group with relapse of the uveitis emphasizes the need of sustained control of inflammation in order to optimize visual outcomes in patients. These patients need close follow-up for reactivation of the inflammation, so that appropriate adjustments to treatment can be made." The National Eye Institute (NEI), which is part of the National Institutes of Health, supported the MUST Trial and MUST Trial Follow-up Study. The Mount Sinai Health System is an integrated health system committed to providing distinguished care, conducting transformative research, and advancing biomedical education. Structured around seven hospital campuses and a single medical school, the Health System has an extensive ambulatory network and a range of inpatient and outpatient services--from community-based facilities to tertiary and quaternary care. The System includes approximately 7,100 primary and specialty care physicians; 12 joint-venture ambulatory surgery centers; more than 140 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and 31 affiliated community health centers. Physicians are affiliated with the renowned Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, which is ranked among the highest in the nation in National Institutes of Health funding per investigator. The Mount Sinai Hospital is in the "Honor Roll" of best hospitals in America, ranked No. 15 nationally in the 2016-2017 "Best Hospitals" issue of U.S. News & World Report. The Mount Sinai Hospital is also ranked as one of the nation's top 20 hospitals in Geriatrics, Gastroenterology/GI Surgery, Cardiology/Heart Surgery, Diabetes/Endocrinology, Nephrology, Neurology/Neurosurgery, and Ear, Nose & Throat, and is in the top 50 in four other specialties. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked No. 10 nationally for Ophthalmology, while Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Mount Sinai St. Luke's, and Mount Sinai West are ranked regionally. Mount Sinai's Kravis Children's Hospital is ranked in seven out of ten pediatric specialties by U.S. News & World Report in "Best Children's Hospitals." For more information, visit http://www. , or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Dr. Alan I. Benvenisty, MD is dual board certified in general surgery and general vascular surgery in New York City. He is known for his distinguished expertise and experience in the diagnosis and treatment of vascular diseases. Beyond his broad specialization in vascular surgery, Dr. Benvenisty holds sub-specialty training in treating renovascular disease and aortic aneurysm. He is known for his minimally invasive surgical techniques and knowledge in endovascular surgery. Dr. Benvenisty’s advanced treatment approaches have helped countless patients avoid dialysis and overcome renal and kidney failure. Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. has recently recognized Dr. Benvenisty’s unrivaled success in vascular surgery by awarding him as a "Regional Top Doctor" for 2017. Castle Connolly selects the nation's "Top Doctors" based on a peer nomination process and an extensive review by a physician-led research team. Dr. Benvenisty’s medical training, board certifications, achievements, and other credentials were taken into consideration for the award. Castle Connolly has up to 100,000 regional nominees competing in several medical specialties. The “Top Doctor” winner is given the privilege of being featured in numerous media outlets and reputable publications, including the America's Top Doctors® book, online directories, various magazines and multiple national media sources. Castle Connolly is considered the nation’s most trusted source for finding reputable physician specialists in each region. Dr. Benvenisty has undoubtedly earned his position as a Castle Connolly “Top Doctor” for the field of vascular surgery in New York. Beyond his extensive credentials, achievements and leadership roles in the medical community, Dr. Benvenisty continues to be a pioneer physician in the treatment of vascular disease. While he specializes in vascular surgery and endovascular surgery, he is also a registered vascular technologist (RVT) and considered an expert in renal transplant surgery. Dr. Benvenisty’s super-specialty involves helping patients avoid dialysis whenever possible, even at end stage renal failure. He brings a conservative approach to treatment and intervention, but he also holds noteworthy surgical skills in carotid, aneurysm and limb (salvage) bypass surgery. “Being awarded as a Castle Connolly’s Top Doctor and included in such a reputable database is an honor I truly value. My intention is to continue to pursue excellence in the rapidly changing field of vascular surgery, which ultimately benefits my patients,” says Dr. Alan Benvenisty of New York. About Alan I. Benvenisty, MD: Dr. Alan I. Benvenisty graduated as Valedictorian with summa cum laude honors from Union College in Schenectady, New York. With a Bachelor’s Degree in Biology, he attended the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, where he remained to complete his internship and residency in General Surgery. Selected as “Super-Chief,” he completed his Fellowship in Vascular and Transplant Surgery and was invited to join the staff at The Presbyterian Hospital. During his eighteen-year tenure, he became a respected member of the Faculty of the College of Physicians and Surgeons and was later promoted to Professor of Clinical Surgery. Dr. Benvenisty is also a respected member of several surgical societies, including one of few Vascular Surgeons in the American Society of Transplant Surgeons. He is affiliated with The Mount Sinai Hospital, Mount Sinai St. Luke’s, and Mount Sinai West in New York. Dr. Benvenisty currently leads the non-invasive vascular laboratory at St. Luke’s Roosevelt, where he also sits as Director of Surgical Clerkship for Columbia University. If you would like to get more information about the vascular treatments offered by Dr. Benvenisty, please call his New York office at (212) 523-4706 or visit their website at http://www.drbenvenisty.com


Patent
Neurotrope Bioscience, The Mount Sinai Hospital and Mount Sinai School of Medicine | Date: 2015-04-14

Treating subjects having a lipid storage disorder with a composition comprising a PKC activator, such as bryostatins, bryologs, and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Accordingly, the present disclosure provides methods for treating human subjects suffering from lipid storage disorders, such as Niemann-Pick disease, by administering PKC activators. The present disclosure provides, according to certain embodiments, methods comprising administering to a subject with Niemann-Pick Type C disease a pharmaceutically effective amount of bryostatin 1.

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