Mount Sinai, NY, United States
Mount Sinai, NY, United States

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Dr. Emer has joined forces with INFUSIO®, an innovative European treatment center offering cutting edge integrative therapies to achieve optimal health. INFUSIO® was founded by Philip Battiade, a British born Naturopath with 2 decades of experience in cellular therapies and integrative medicine. INFUSIO® is among medicine’s new benchmark for foundational medicine for optimal health and specializes in pre-and post-surgical care. Dr. Emer and INFUSIO® use comprehensive approaches to healing, using a combination of innovative techniques and cutting-edge technologies to create the ultimate patient experience. The collaboration between a cosmetic skin expert and an integrative medical institute is the first-of-its-kind, progressive, all-inclusive pairing unlike anything Beverly Hills has ever seen. “By fusing the practices together we are able to offer our patients the opportunity to recover and prepare for cosmetic procedures in an environment specifically designed for optimal results and healing,” Dr. Emer said.  Intravenous (IV) therapy before and after hi definition liposuction to restore necessary vitamins and minerals lost during surgery, as well as the in-house hyperbaric chamber for improved oxygenation of blood cells, are examples of the advanced technologies the fusion of services will provide patients. “This partnership will change the paradigm in which cosmetic surgery is performed," Philip Battiade comments, “Every good physician uses quality tools to perform their work. While a skilled surgeon may perform a perfect procedure, if the material he is working on, namely our body, is in a sub-optimal condition, this will be reflected in his results. To achieve an optimal health state my concept takes a foundational approach on our patient’s health which is based on my Five Steps to Health. We will provide services to optimize the body from the inside out prior and post your cosmetic procedure. With that we are augmenting outcomes and honor the artwork of skilled surgeons like Dr. Emer.” The new high end and lux space puts the patients first while creating a one stop shop for all their aesthetic needs. It has a “spa-like” feel and makes going to the doctor’s office a sweet escape. “It’s all about the patients. I want every individual that walks into the office to feel completely catered to with an experience unlike any other,” said Dr. Emer. The gorgeous layout covers 2,000 square feet and features five treatment rooms designed to make each tailored, personalized session as comfortable and relaxing as possible. In addition, Dr. Emer and INFUSIO® have a space completely dedicated to social media. A ‘think tank’ style media lab was designed to strategize and create digital content to promote education and consumer awareness and safety in cosmetic procedures. The setting will allow the practice to create the highest quality experiences for patients and beyond that give an inside look into the cutting edge technologies, procedures, and techniques Dr. Emer is doing on a daily basis. On the penthouse level, patients can unwind with rejuvenating facial treatments, therapeutic massage, IV or vitamin therapy, and learn about INFUSIO®’s state of the art stem cell therapy for longevity and chronic disease such as joint pain. “The views from the penthouse are spectacular and put my patients at ease when deciding on or getting aesthetic treatments” says Dr. Emer. No expense was spared to create a comfortable place for patients to receive personal, private care from Dr. Emer and staff. Dr. Emer’s meticulous detail, personalized approach to patient care, and numerous treatment options for all cosmetic conditions, give astonishing results and lifelong relationships. To learn more about this one-of-a-kind collaborative oasis, visit https://JasonEmerMD.com/ and http://InfusioBeverlyHills.com/. Visit Dr. Emer’s website https://JasonEmerMD.com/ for more information on the most advanced treatments in cosmetic dermatology and body sculpting. Dr. Jason Emer’s main practice and passion are liposculpture and body sculpting/etching procedures. For obtaining the best results with the least amount of downtime and for patient safety reasons, all procedures are performed using a local fluid called “tumescent anesthesia,” which allows for a comfortable surgery with little risks. Dr. Emer uses all of the advanced technologies for body contouring/etching to tailor his results to each person's concerns, no single device or type of liposuction is used. Multiple devices – such as VASERLipo®, SmartLipo®, and Body-Jet® – and techniques, such as superficial muscular etching and power-assisted fat removal, are employed during each surgery to get the ultimate results and best long-term outcomes. After completing a preliminary medicine internship in Chicago, Illinois, at the Saint Joseph Hospital, Dr. Emer completed a two-year dermatopharmacology fellowship at The Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan, New York. He spent a significant amount of time conducting clinical trials on investigational treatments in cosmetic, laser and surgical dermatology. Dr. Emer’s work has led to a number of medications and devices to be FDA approved for conditions such as passive wrinkles and folds of the face, dynamic movement wrinkles/lines, facial lipoatrophy, facial pigmentation/melasma, photodamage/actinic keratosis, hemangiomas/vascular birthmarks, and tattoos. Throughout his residency training, he focused the majority of his cosmetic interests in the area of body contouring/sculpting, liposuction, and fat harvesting and transfer, learning from world-renowned experts in the fields of dermatology and plastic surgery. Dr. Emer began an HIV treatment clinic where fat transfer, facial fillers, and other cosmetic and plastic surgical procedures were used to enhance facial features and address body disproportions. Dr. Emer was chief resident in his final year of dermatology residency. After finishing his residency, he moved to San Francisco, California, to further advance his training in the area of facial fillers, chemicals peels, laser and light treatments, skin cancer surgery, and plastic surgery, such as scar revision and hi definition body sculpting/etching and fat transfer. Dr. Emer is one of a select few surgeons in the United States to perform 4D (four dimensional) body contouring/etching, in which he precisely and meticulously defines target areas to not only remove fat but also contour and define circumferentially. He uses this technique to “etch” six packs and create highly defined musculature, such as the chest, buttock, breast, and calves. With the latest advances in fat harvesting with water-assisted removal, Dr. Emer can use your body’s own fat and platelet-rich plasma to contour the surrounding areas and define the underlying muscles. Harvested fat can be transferred to other areas to address concerns such facial wrinkles and lack of volume, hand veins and aging, buttock and breast size and lifting, and the muscular size and bulk of the chest, biceps, calves, shoulders, and quadriceps. Cellulite and skin tightening are also addressed with each individual case and can be improved with a combination of surgery, lasers, fat transfer, and/or external heating/suction devices to get the ultimate results in body contouring procedures. Dr. Emer is a leading expert in cosmetic surgery and laser dermatology who utilizes the latest advancements in non-invasive treatments for anti-aging. He utilizes combination treatments to get the ultimate results and customizes treatments to the patient's skin type and long-term goals. Dr. Emer’s interests include acne and traumatic scars, abnormal pigmentation, burns, and anti-aging/rejuvenation combination treatments. He personally treats all his patients to ensure the best results and doesn't delegate to other staff in most instances.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

(NEW YORK -- May 17, 2017) Biomarkers in the teeth of wild orangutans indicate nursing patterns related to food fluctuations in their habitats, which can help guide understanding of breast-feeding evolution in humans, according to a study published today in Science Advances. This work was led by researchers in the Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and evolutionary biologists at Griffith University in Australia. Breast-feeding is a critical aspect of human development, and the duration of exclusive nursing and timing of introducing solid food to the diet are also important determinants of health in human and other primate populations. Many aspects of nursing, however, remain poorly understood. Orangutan nursing habits have also been difficult to study due to challenges in observing this behavior in their natural environment. To work around these challenges, researchers reconstructed diet histories of wild orangutans by using their teeth as biomarkers. The growth patterns of teeth, which resemble tree rings, allows investigators to determine concentrations of the maternal elements in the infants' teeth over time, which yields information about their nursing and dietary patterns. "Early-life dietary transitions reflect fundamental aspects of primate life, history, and evolution," said Christine Austin, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health and second study author. "By first studying nursing patterns of our primate cousins, we can apply these findings to future studies in humans. This method can be used to reconstruct the diet histories of contemporary humans in order to reliably and accurately study the relationship between infant diet and health outcomes in childhood or later life, as well as inform models of population growth." In this study, the researchers examined levels of the element barium in teeth samples from deceased Sumatran and Bornean orangutans housed in zoological museums. Teeth analyses showed that the orangutans consumed maternal milk exclusively for their first year, as determined by a gradual increase in barium levels over the first 12 months. After the first year, the teeth indicated cycles that alternated between more and less milk consumption, which may occur until eight to nine years of age, a later weaning age than any other primate. This cycling is believed to result from the changing and unpredictable availability of fruit, which leads young orangutans to rely on maternal milk for a longer period of time. "The evidence of cyclical multi-year nursing patterns and late weaning ages in orangutans, reported here for the first time, will lead to further studies of how food availability and other environmental factors affect nursing patterns in primates," said Tanya Smith, PhD, Associate Professor at Griffith University and lead study author. "Additional research is needed to determine whether similar breast-feeding patterns help human babies increase resilience to environmental stressors in infancy." For more information on exposure biology research at Mount Sinai, please visit http://labs. . The Mount Sinai Health System is an integrated health system committed to providing distinguished care, conducting transformative research, and advancing biomedical education. Structured around seven hospital campuses and a single medical school, the Health System has an extensive ambulatory network and a range of inpatient and outpatient services--from community-based facilities to tertiary and quaternary care. The System includes approximately 7,100 primary and specialty care physicians; 12 joint-venture ambulatory surgery centers; more than 140 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and 31 affiliated community health centers. Physicians are affiliated with the renowned Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, which is ranked among the highest in the nation in National Institutes of Health funding per investigator. The Mount Sinai Hospital is in the "Honor Roll" of best hospitals in America, ranked No. 15 nationally in the 2016-2017 "Best Hospitals" issue of U.S. News & World Report. The Mount Sinai Hospital is also ranked as one of the nation's top 20 hospitals in Geriatrics, Gastroenterology/GI Surgery, Cardiology/Heart Surgery, Diabetes/Endocrinology, Nephrology, Neurology/Neurosurgery, and Ear, Nose & Throat, and is in the top 50 in four other specialties. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked No. 10 nationally for Ophthalmology, while Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Mount Sinai St. Luke's, and Mount Sinai West are ranked regionally. Mount Sinai's Kravis Children's Hospital is ranked in seven out of ten pediatric specialties by U.S. News & World Report in "Best Children's Hospitals." For more information, visit http://www. , or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.


"Underserved heart valve patients are at a significant disadvantage and have lower chances of receiving the care and treatment they need to survive," said David H. Adams, M.D., cardiac surgeon-in-chief, Mount Sinai Health System, Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Professor and chairman Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and The Mount Sinai Hospital, and president, Mitral Foundation, who also presented at the summit. "It's inspiring to see the focused, strategic efforts of Every Heartbeat Matters' partners who are bringing new solutions and boundless energy to address this global public health issue." Every Heartbeat Matters supports cardiac- and patient-focused non-profit organizations through grants from Edwards Lifesciences Foundation and donations of Edwards heart valve technologies for indigent care. The initiative focuses on one goal: by 2020, Every Heartbeat Matters will impact the global burden of heart valve disease by supporting the education, screening and treatment of one million underserved people. Investments in this initiative since 2014 total more than $15 million. "Our Every Heartbeat Matters partners are bringing strategic philanthropy, passion and commitment to help vulnerable people all around the world who are affected by heart valve disease," said Michael A. Mussallem, chairman and CEO, Edwards Lifesciences, and chairman, Edwards Lifesciences Foundation. "We are proud to help fuel their bold and impactful work and are on track to achieve our collective pursuit of helping one million underserved people by 2020." Dr. Sarano is a consultant of Edwards Lifesciences and Edwards Lifesciences Foundation. Edwards Lifesciences Foundation is accepting requests for funding from non-profit organizations to partner on programs for its Every Heartbeat Matters initiative or those that strengthen the communities in which Edwards' employees live and work. The foundation's 2017 grant cycle is open May 15 to June 23, and grant applications and other information, including a complete listing of all grants issued, are available at www.edwards.com/corporategiving. Edwards Lifesciences, based in Irvine, Calif., is the global leader in patient-focused medical innovations for structural heart disease, as well as critical care and surgical monitoring.  Driven by a passion to help patients, the company collaborates with the world's leading clinicians and researchers to address unmet healthcare needs, working to improve patient outcomes and enhance lives. For more information, visit www.edwards.com and follow us on Twitter @EdwardsLifesci. Edwards Lifesciences Foundation focuses on supporting underserved heart valve and critically ill patients, as well as strengthening the communities in which Edwards employees live and work through gifts to non-profit organizations all around the world. Additional information can be found at www.edwards.com/corporategiving. This news release includes forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements by Drs. Sarano and Adams and Mr. Mussallem and expectations regarding achievement of the Every Heartbeat Matters goal. Forward-looking statements are based on estimates and assumptions made by management of the company and are believed to be reasonable, though they are inherently uncertain and difficult to predict. Our forward-looking statements speak only as of the date on which they are made and we do not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date of the statement. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements based on a number of factors, including but not limited to, unanticipated delays or changes in trends for achieving the goals. These and other additional factors are detailed in the company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission including its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016. These filings, along with important safety information about our products, may be found at www.edwards.com. Edwards, Edwards Lifesciences, the stylized E logo and Every Heartbeat Matters are trademarks of Edwards Lifesciences Corporation. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/edwards-lifesciences-every-heartbeat-matters-initiative-on-track-to-impact-1-million-underserved-people-by-2020-300459908.html


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Mount Sinai Health System and The New Jewish Home are continuing their expansion of services to improve the care of hospitalized patients who require specialized post-acute or long-term care at a skilled nursing facility after leaving the hospital. Through the Mount Sinai-New Jewish Home Hospitalist Program, Mount Sinai doctors specializing in hospital care (known as hospitalists) will provide a seamless transition for patients who need nursing care at The New Jewish Home. The transition of care between hospitals and skilled nursing facilities is a highly vulnerable time for patients. Information may not be adequately relayed and urgent priorities can be overlooked. This innovative model will facilitate greater communication and ensure the transfer of vital information between these venues, allowing patients to receive the expert care they need without interruption. The joint expertise of these two renowned institutions will provide enhanced protocols for follow-up care and will reduce the risk of re-hospitalization in order to provide the best possible outcomes for patients discharged from the hospital. “Building on The New Jewish Home’s already deep and long-standing relationship with Mount Sinai, this new partnership will help accomplish our shared goal of improving care transitions for our patients,” said Audrey Weiner, PhD, President and CEO, The New Jewish Home. “This innovative model ensures the highest quality care for our patients.” “We are excited about this next step in our partnership with The New Jewish Home,” said Andrew Dunn, MD, MPH, SFHM, FACP, Chair-elect of the American College of Physicians Board of Regents, Professor of Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Chief of the Division of Hospital Medicine at Mount Sinai Health System. “The collaboration will allow us to meet a growing need for high-quality nursing home care while strengthening our commitments to the patients and community we serve.” About The New Jewish Home Serving New Yorkers of all faiths and ethnicities for 168 years, The New Jewish Home is transforming eldercare as we know it. One of the nation’s largest and most diversified not‐for‐profit geriatric health and rehabilitation systems, Jewish Home serves 12,000 older adults each year, in their homes and on campuses in Manhattan and Westchester, through short-term rehabilitation, long‐term skilled nursing, low-income housing, and a wide range of home health programs. Jewish Home believes that high quality care and personal dignity are everyone’s right, regardless of background or economic circumstances. Technology, innovation, applied research and new models of care put The New Jewish Home at the vanguard of eldercare providers across the country. About the Mount Sinai Health System The Mount Sinai Health System is an integrated health system committed to providing distinguished care, conducting transformative research, and advancing biomedical education. Structured around seven hospital campuses and a single medical school, the Health System has an extensive ambulatory network and a range of inpatient and outpatient services—from community-based facilities to tertiary and quaternary care. The System includes approximately 7,100 primary and specialty care physicians; 12 joint-venture ambulatory surgery centers; more than 140 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and 31 affiliated community health centers. Physicians are affiliated with the renowned Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, which is ranked among the highest in the nation in National Institutes of Health funding per investigator. The Mount Sinai Hospital is in the “Honor Roll” of best hospitals in America, ranked No. 15 nationally in the 2016-2017 “Best Hospitals” issue of U.S. News & World Report. The Mount Sinai Hospital is also ranked as one of the nation’s top 20 hospitals in Geriatrics, Gastroenterology/GI Surgery, Cardiology/Heart Surgery, Diabetes/Endocrinology, Nephrology, Neurology/Neurosurgery, and Ear, Nose & Throat, and is in the top 50 in four other specialties. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked No. 10 nationally for Ophthalmology, while Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Mount Sinai St. Luke's, and Mount Sinai West are ranked regionally. Mount Sinai’s Kravis Children’s Hospital is ranked in seven out of ten pediatric specialties by U.S. News & World Report in "Best Children's Hospitals." For more information, visit http://www.mountsinai.org/, or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Dr. Alan I. Benvenisty, MD is dual board certified in general surgery and general vascular surgery in New York City. He is known for his distinguished expertise and experience in the diagnosis and treatment of vascular diseases. Beyond his broad specialization in vascular surgery, Dr. Benvenisty holds sub-specialty training in treating renovascular disease and aortic aneurysm. He is known for his minimally invasive surgical techniques and knowledge in endovascular surgery. Dr. Benvenisty’s advanced treatment approaches have helped countless patients avoid dialysis and overcome renal and kidney failure. Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. has recently recognized Dr. Benvenisty’s unrivaled success in vascular surgery by awarding him as a "Regional Top Doctor" for 2017. Castle Connolly selects the nation's "Top Doctors" based on a peer nomination process and an extensive review by a physician-led research team. Dr. Benvenisty’s medical training, board certifications, achievements, and other credentials were taken into consideration for the award. Castle Connolly has up to 100,000 regional nominees competing in several medical specialties. The “Top Doctor” winner is given the privilege of being featured in numerous media outlets and reputable publications, including the America's Top Doctors® book, online directories, various magazines and multiple national media sources. Castle Connolly is considered the nation’s most trusted source for finding reputable physician specialists in each region. Dr. Benvenisty has undoubtedly earned his position as a Castle Connolly “Top Doctor” for the field of vascular surgery in New York. Beyond his extensive credentials, achievements and leadership roles in the medical community, Dr. Benvenisty continues to be a pioneer physician in the treatment of vascular disease. While he specializes in vascular surgery and endovascular surgery, he is also a registered vascular technologist (RVT) and considered an expert in renal transplant surgery. Dr. Benvenisty’s super-specialty involves helping patients avoid dialysis whenever possible, even at end stage renal failure. He brings a conservative approach to treatment and intervention, but he also holds noteworthy surgical skills in carotid, aneurysm and limb (salvage) bypass surgery. “Being awarded as a Castle Connolly’s Top Doctor and included in such a reputable database is an honor I truly value. My intention is to continue to pursue excellence in the rapidly changing field of vascular surgery, which ultimately benefits my patients,” says Dr. Alan Benvenisty of New York. About Alan I. Benvenisty, MD: Dr. Alan I. Benvenisty graduated as Valedictorian with summa cum laude honors from Union College in Schenectady, New York. With a Bachelor’s Degree in Biology, he attended the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, where he remained to complete his internship and residency in General Surgery. Selected as “Super-Chief,” he completed his Fellowship in Vascular and Transplant Surgery and was invited to join the staff at The Presbyterian Hospital. During his eighteen-year tenure, he became a respected member of the Faculty of the College of Physicians and Surgeons and was later promoted to Professor of Clinical Surgery. Dr. Benvenisty is also a respected member of several surgical societies, including one of few Vascular Surgeons in the American Society of Transplant Surgeons. He is affiliated with The Mount Sinai Hospital, Mount Sinai St. Luke’s, and Mount Sinai West in New York. Dr. Benvenisty currently leads the non-invasive vascular laboratory at St. Luke’s Roosevelt, where he also sits as Director of Surgical Clerkship for Columbia University. If you would like to get more information about the vascular treatments offered by Dr. Benvenisty, please call his New York office at (212) 523-4706 or visit their website at http://www.drbenvenisty.com


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Epilepsy patients who experience three or more generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) per year have a significantly increased risk of sudden, unexpected death, according to new guidelines presented at the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Annual Meeting on April 24. The guidelines, co-developed by the AAN and the American Epilepsy Society, state that epilepsy patients who experience frequent GTCS—a type of seizure that involves a loss of consciousness and violent muscle contractions—are 15 times more likely to experience unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) than those who experience few or no GTCS. This risk is increased for adults, with one in 4,500 children and one in every 1,000 adults dying unexpectedly from epilepsy. This translates to up to 18 in 1,000 deaths per year for people with frequent GTCS. While this phenomenon is relatively rare, it is still important that healthcare professionals talk to their patients with epilepsy about the risk of SUDEP and the importance of managing frequent GTCS, said Cynthia L. Harden, M.D, lead author of the guideline and a professor of neurology at The Mount Sinai Hospital. “The guideline shows that being free of seizures, particularly tonic-clonic seizures, is strongly associated with decreased risk,” said Harden during an AAN Annual Meeting press conference on the guidelines. “Educating health professionals and people with epilepsy about SUDEP is an important first step.” The guideline’s outline steps that health professionals and patients should take to reduce their risk of SUDEP. For patients with epilepsy who continue to experience GTCS, the guidelines recommend  clinicians should continue to actively manage epilepsy therapies to reduce seizure occurrences and the risk of SUDEP, while incorporating patient preferences and weighing the risks and benefits of any new approach. Healthcare professionals need to stress the importance of adhering to medication and learning to manage seizure triggers with their patients, said Elizabeth Donner, M.D., co-author of the guidelines, associate professor at the University of Toronto and pediatric neurologist at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. “People need to understand that the risk of generalized tonic-clonic seizures is not only related to maintaining a driver’s license, maintaining work or other things like that, it’s actually related to risk of death,” said Donner at the AAN press event. “Further, I would hope that this can be a motivator to pursue treatments beyond medications when medications are not successful at treating seizures. “We know that for a certain population of people living with epilepsy, medication, which is our first approach, does not work. In those cases, we need people to feel safe and motivated to work with their healthcare team to find other treatments, like surgery and other approaches to managing seizures” The guidelines also state  unwitnessed seizures that occur at night may increase the risk of unexpected death from epilepsy. For patients with frequent GTCS and nocturnal seizures, some patients and families may want to consider having a secondary person present in the bedroom during sleep or using a remote listening device to reduce SUDEP risk. Both Harden and Donner stated these guidelines are not meant to scare patients, but  that most patients or families of patients with epilepsy want to be informed of factors that are associated with an increased risk of a catastrophic event such as SUDEP. It is a doctor’s responsibility to make sure their patients and families are getting information from them about risks, and not from other sources, said Donner. “I see parents that have seen their children have a particularly convulsive, body shaking-seizure and are terrified,” said Donner. “For most of these parents it has run through their head that their child could die from this. They have looked it up, they have Googled it, and it is almost the elephant in the room. “So it is not difficult to talk about the risk of death associated with an illness when people are already thinking about it. In fact, if we as health care practitioners don’t share high quality information with people, they will find other information from other sources. When someone comes to see their health care practitioner, they really need to get information about their disorder in its entirety.”


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Epilepsy patients who experience three or more generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) per year have a significantly increased risk of sudden, unexpected death, according to new guidelines presented at the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Annual Meeting on April 24. The guidelines, co-developed by the AAN and the American Epilepsy Society, state that epilepsy patients who experience frequent GTCS—a type of seizure that involves a loss of consciousness and violent muscle contractions—are 15 times more likely to experience unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) than those who experience few or no GTCS. This risk is increased for adults, with one in 4,500 children and one in every 1,000 adults dying unexpectedly from epilepsy. This translates to up to 18 in 1,000 deaths per year for people with frequent GTCS. While this phenomenon is relatively rare, it is still important that healthcare professionals talk to their patients with epilepsy about the risk of SUDEP and the importance of managing frequent GTCS, said Cynthia L. Harden, M.D, lead author of the guideline and a professor of neurology at The Mount Sinai Hospital. “The guideline shows that being free of seizures, particularly tonic-clonic seizures, is strongly associated with decreased risk,” said Harden during an AAN Annual Meeting press conference on the guidelines. “Educating health professionals and people with epilepsy about SUDEP is an important first step.” The guideline’s outline steps that health professionals and patients should take to reduce their risk of SUDEP. For patients with epilepsy who continue to experience GTCS, the guidelines recommend  clinicians should continue to actively manage epilepsy therapies to reduce seizure occurrences and the risk of SUDEP, while incorporating patient preferences and weighing the risks and benefits of any new approach. Healthcare professionals need to stress the importance of adhering to medication and learning to manage seizure triggers with their patients, said Elizabeth Donner, M.D., co-author of the guidelines, associate professor at the University of Toronto and pediatric neurologist at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. “People need to understand that the risk of generalized tonic-clonic seizures is not only related to maintaining a driver’s license, maintaining work or other things like that, it’s actually related to risk of death,” said Donner at the AAN press event. “Further, I would hope that this can be a motivator to pursue treatments beyond medications when medications are not successful at treating seizures. “We know that for a certain population of people living with epilepsy, medication, which is our first approach, does not work. In those cases, we need people to feel safe and motivated to work with their healthcare team to find other treatments, like surgery and other approaches to managing seizures” The guidelines also state  unwitnessed seizures that occur at night may increase the risk of unexpected death from epilepsy. For patients with frequent GTCS and nocturnal seizures, some patients and families may want to consider having a secondary person present in the bedroom during sleep or using a remote listening device to reduce SUDEP risk. Both Harden and Donner stated these guidelines are not meant to scare patients, but  that most patients or families of patients with epilepsy want to be informed of factors that are associated with an increased risk of a catastrophic event such as SUDEP. It is a doctor’s responsibility to make sure their patients and families are getting information from them about risks, and not from other sources, said Donner. “I see parents that have seen their children have a particularly convulsive, body shaking-seizure and are terrified,” said Donner. “For most of these parents it has run through their head that their child could die from this. They have looked it up, they have Googled it, and it is almost the elephant in the room. “So it is not difficult to talk about the risk of death associated with an illness when people are already thinking about it. In fact, if we as health care practitioners don’t share high quality information with people, they will find other information from other sources. When someone comes to see their health care practitioner, they really need to get information about their disorder in its entirety.”


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

(New York - May 5, 2017) - Much is known about flu viruses, but little is understood about how they reproduce inside human host cells, spreading infection. Now, a research team headed by investigators from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is the first to identify a mechanism by which influenza A, a family of pathogens that includes the most deadly strains of flu worldwide, hijacks cellular machinery to replicate. The study findings, published online today in Cell, also identifies a link between congenital defects in that machinery -- the RNA exosome -- and the neurodegeneration that results in people who have that rare mutation. It was by studying the cells of patients with an RNA exosome mutation, which were contributed by six collaborating medical centers, that the investigators were able to understand how influenza A hijacks the RNA exosome inside a cell's nucleus for its own purposes. "This study shows how we can discover genes linked to disease -- in this case, neurodegeneration -- by looking at the natural symbiosis between a host and a pathogen," says the study's senior investigator, Ivan Marazzi, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Microbiology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Influenza A is responsible in part not only for seasonal flus but also pandemics such as H1N1 and other flus that cross from mammals (such as swine) or birds into humans. "We are all a result of co-evolution with viruses, bacteria, and other microbes, but when this process is interrupted, which we call the broken symmetry hypothesis, disease can result," Dr. Marazzi says. The genes affected in these rare cases of neurodegeneration caused by a congenital RNA exosome mutation may offer future insight into more common brain disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, he added. In the case of Influenza A, the loss of RNA exosome activity severely compromises viral infectivity, but also manifests in human neurodegeneration suggesting that viruses target essential proteins implicated in rare disease in order to ensure continual adaptation. Influenza A is an RNA virus, meaning that it reproduces itself inside the nucleus. Most viruses replicate in a cell's cytoplasm, outside the nucleus. The researchers found that once inside the nucleus, influenza A hijacks the RNA exosome, an essential protein complex that degrades RNA as a way to regulate gene expression. The flu pathogen needs extra RNA to start the replication process so it steals these molecules from the hijacked exosome, Dr. Marazzi says. "Viruses have a very intelligent way of not messing too much with our own biology," he says. "It makes use of our by-products, so rather than allowing the exosome to chew up and degrade excess RNA, it tags the exosome and steals the RNA it needs before it is destroyed. "Without an RNA exosome, a virus cannot grow, so the agreement between the virus and host is that it is ok for the virus to use some of the host RNA because the host has other ways to suppress the virus that is replicated," says the study's lead author, Alex Rialdi, MPH, a graduate assistant in Dr. Marazzi's laboratory. Co-authors include investigators from the University of California-San Francisco, Columbia University, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Regeneron Genetics Center, Burnham Institute for Medical Research, and the University of California-Los Angeles. The study was supported by NIH grants 2RO1AI099195 and DP2 2OD008651 (U.B.), and partially supported by HHSN272201400008C - Center for Research on Influenza Pathogenesis (CRIP) a NIAID-funded Center of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance (A.G.S, H.v.B., R.A., and I.M.). Other support includes the Department of Defense W911NF-14-1-0353 (to I.M.) NIH grant 1R56AI114770-01A1 (to I. M.), NIH grant 1R01AN3663134 (I.M. and H.v.B), and NIH grant U19AI106754 FLUOMICS (I.M., R.A., S.C., N.K., A.G.S.). The Mount Sinai Health System is an integrated health system committed to providing distinguished care, conducting transformative research, and advancing biomedical education. Structured around seven hospital campuses and a single medical school, the Health System has an extensive ambulatory network and a range of inpatient and outpatient services -- from community-based facilities to tertiary and quaternary care. The System includes approximately 7,100 primary and specialty care physicians; 12 joint-venture ambulatory surgery centers; more than 140 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and 31 affiliated community health centers. Physicians are affiliated with the renowned Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, which is ranked among the highest in the nation in National Institutes of Health funding per investigator. The Mount Sinai Hospital is in the "Honor Roll" of best hospitals in America, ranked No. 15 nationally in the 2016-2017 "Best Hospitals" issue of U.S. News & World Report. The Mount Sinai Hospital is also ranked as one of the nation's top 20 hospitals in Geriatrics, Gastroenterology/GI Surgery, Cardiology/Heart Surgery, Diabetes/Endocrinology, Nephrology, Neurology/Neurosurgery, and Ear, Nose & Throat, and is in the top 50 in four other specialties. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked No. 10 nationally for Ophthalmology, while Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Mount Sinai St. Luke's, and Mount Sinai West are ranked regionally. Mount Sinai's Kravis Children's Hospital is ranked in seven out of ten pediatric specialties by U.S. News & World Report in "Best Children's Hospitals." For more information, visit http://www. , or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.


Patent
Neurotrope Bioscience, The Mount Sinai Hospital and Mount Sinai School of Medicine | Date: 2015-04-14

Treating subjects having a lipid storage disorder with a composition comprising a PKC activator, such as bryostatins, bryologs, and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Accordingly, the present disclosure provides methods for treating human subjects suffering from lipid storage disorders, such as Niemann-Pick disease, by administering PKC activators. The present disclosure provides, according to certain embodiments, methods comprising administering to a subject with Niemann-Pick Type C disease a pharmaceutically effective amount of bryostatin 1.


Patent
Neurotrope Bioscience and The Mount Sinai Hospital | Date: 2015-04-14

Treating subjects having a lipid storage disorder with a composition comprising a PKC activator, such as bryostatins, bryologs, and polyunsaturated fatty acids.

Loading The Mount Sinai Hospital collaborators
Loading The Mount Sinai Hospital collaborators