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Halifax, Canada

Mount Saint Vincent University, often referred to as The Mount, is a primarily undergraduate public university located in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, and was established in 1873. Mount Saint Vincent offers Undergraduate programs in Arts, Science, Education, and a number of professional programs including Applied Human Nutrition, Business Administration, Child and Youth Study, Public Relations, and Tourism and Hospitality Management. As well, the Mount has 13 graduate degrees in areas including Applied Human Nutrition, School Psychology, Child and Youth Study, Education, Family Studies and Gerontology, Public Relations and Women’s Studies. The Mount's first doctorate program, a PhD in Educational Studies, is a joint-initiative with St. Francis Xavier University and Acadia University. The Mount offer 10 full undergraduate degree programs and four graduate degree programs online.The university attracts many students in part because of its small class sizes, specialty programs, and location. The Mount has Canada Research Chairs in Gender Identity and Social Practices as well as Food Security and Policy Change. This institution is unique nationwide as it has a Chair in learning disabilities, Master of Public Relations program, Bachelor of Science in Communication Studies, and numerous other programs, faculty, and research initiatives. Wikipedia.


Franz-Odendaal T.A.,Mount Saint Vincent University
Frontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual library | Year: 2011

The primary focus of this article is to review intramembranous bone development, that is, ossification that takes place directly. Comparisons with endochondral ossification (ossification with a cartilage precursor) will be made in order to illustrate the differences between these two modes of ossification and to highlight the comparatively sparse information that is available about intramembranous ossification. Despite decades of research into understanding skeletal development, there is still much to learn. Most of the research in this area has focused on the development of the calvariae (or skull bones) as typical intramembranous bones and the development of the limb bones as a typical endochondral bones. Few studies investigate other skeletal elements or compare these processes in a systematic manner. In this review, I focus primarily on condensation formation and skeletal patterning with specific examples from different organisms. Source


Fisher S.,University of Pennsylvania | Franz-Odendaal T.,Mount Saint Vincent University
Current Opinion in Genetics and Development | Year: 2012

Current fossil, embryological and genetic data shed light on the evolution of the gene regulatory network (GRN) governing bone formation. The key proteins and genes involved in skeletogenesis are well accepted. We discuss when these essential components of the GRN evolved and propose that the Runx genes, master regulators of skeletogenesis, functioned in early cartilages well before they were co-opted to function in the making of bone. Two rounds of whole genome duplication, together with additional tandem gene duplications, created a genetic substrate for segregation of one GRN into several networks regulating the related tissues of cartilage, bone, enamel, and dentin. During this segregation, Runx2 assumed its position at the top of the bone GRN, and Sox9 was excluded from bone, retaining its ancient role in cartilage. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Martinello E.,Mount Saint Vincent University
Sexuality and Disability | Year: 2015

Children with intellectual disabilities (IDs) are at an increased risk for experiencing sexual abuse, as compared with their typically developing peers (Mahoney and Poling in J Dev Phys Disabil 23(4):369–376, 2011). One of the most frequently cited populations of sexual offenders against this population are other individuals with IDs. This may be due to skill deficits in areas including social development, cognitive abilities, emotion regulation and awareness, and communication in both expressive and receptive areas. Delays in each of these areas can impact an individual’s ability to navigate healthy sexuality and relationships, partnered or with oneself. Whereas education and intervention can support building capacity for healthy sexuality across the lifespan, there presents a unique opportunity to address both risk-reduction (i.e., addresses the potential victim) and prevention (i.e., addresses the potential perpetrator) by educating one population, that is, all individuals with IDs. Challenges such as the duality of simultaneously being victim and perpetrator, the potential need for education/support and direct consequences, and the balancing act of supporting a potential perpetrator whilst protecting potential victims will be examined in this literature review (Thompson in Health Risk Saf 2(1):33–46, 2000; Fyson in Br J Learn Disabil 35:181–186, 2007). © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Source


Franz-Odendaal T.A.,Mount Saint Vincent University
Frontiers in Bioscience | Year: 2011

The primary focus of this article is to review intramembranous bone development, that is, ossification that takes place directly. Comparisons with endochondral ossification (ossification with a cartilage precursor) will be made in order to illustrate the differences between these two modes of ossification and to highlight the comparatively sparse information that is available about intramembranous ossification. Despite decades of research into understanding skeletal development, there is still much to learn. Most of the research in this area has focused on the development of the calvariae (or skull bones) as typical intramembranous bones and the development of the limb bones as a typical endochondral bones. Few studies investigate other skeletal elements or compare these processes in a systematic manner. In this review, I focus primarily on condensation formation and skeletal patterning with specific examples from different organisms. Source


MacRae H.,Mount Saint Vincent University
Qualitative Health Research | Year: 2010

Although any illness can negatively affect the self, Alzheimers disease poses a special threat. Based on interviews with nine Canadians diagnosed with early-stage Alzheimers disease, and adopting a symbolic interactionist perspective, this study examines the impact of the illness on identity. Findings indicate that, given the necessary resources, persons with Alzheimers can live meaningful, purposeful lives and creatively manage to protect and preserve identity. In contrast to previous research, participants did not reveal a great deal of concern about potential loss of self. Source

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