Mosaic Co.

Lithia, FL, United States

Mosaic Co.

Lithia, FL, United States
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News Article | September 30, 2016
Site: www.techtimes.com

A giant sinkhole in Florida has reportedly leaked gallons of polluted water into the state's main potable water aquifer, leaving nearby residents concerned about its safety. The leak occurred at a plant by fertilizer company Mosaic in Polk County, Central Florida, according to a report by member station WUSF. The Minnesota-based company has hired a third-party firm to conduct tests at the site. In August, the 45-foot-wide sinkhole opened up at the Mosaic Co. plant under a pile of hazardous waste, The Tampa Bay Times reported. An employee of Mosaic found the water loss caused by the leak on Aug. 27. The next day, the state notified the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, said David Jellerson, the senior director for environmental and phosphate projects at Mosaic. The sinkhole reportedly poured out more than 200 million gallons of acidic water laced with sodium and sulfate from a pool on top of a 120-foot gypsum stack, investigations revealed. Furthermore, an unknown quantity of gypsum also fell into the 300-feet-deep sinkhole, although the sinkhole could be much deeper than that, reports said. Gypsum, which contains low levels of radiation, is a fertilizer byproduct. On Thursday, Sept. 29, Mosaic spokesperson Jackie Barron said the sulphates and acidity were discovered in a recovery well that is typically used to pull water out within a quarter mile of the giant sinkhole. Prior to that, Barron said the contamination was detected only at the recovery well, and that no contamination had been found in the monitoring wells beyond the company's property or anywhere farther than the hole. The Aug. 27 leak supposedly stayed under the wraps for a while before homeowners near the New Wales plant was notified about it on Sept. 19 when reports broke out, according to ABC News. Only then did the company give residents bottled water. By that time, a huge wastewater pond had disappeared through the hole in the pile of phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum is the byproduct that forms when phosphate ore is processed into fertilizer with sulfuric acid. Because the material is radioactive, it cannot be reused, but the wastewater involved is stored in the pond on top of piles. Mosaic is advising residents not to drink their well water, said Courtney Tinsley who lives less than 2 miles away from the plant. But Tinsley is worried about its safety. "I said 'If we can't drink it, we shouldn't be bathing in it too," said Tinsley. According to Mosaic, initial results of the tests were released to residents on Tuesday. The tests have revealed results that are "within normal drinking standards," the company said. "[T]here have been no offsite impacts as a result of this incident," Mosaic added. In the meantime, the company is offering free bottled waters on request to residents until testing is complete. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | March 20, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

Industry survivors such as Helmerich & Payne and Exxon Mobil have risen as much as 29% in the past two months Eddie Seal/Bloomberg Valero Energy is among two oil refiners on a new list of 15 S&P 500 energy and materials companies with the lowest levels of long-term debt to equity. D MA MB MC MD ME MG ZG ZQ ZR ZS ZT ZU Stocks of oil-related companies with little debt that we listed Jan. 11 have greatly outperformed the S&P 500 Index. With another earnings season behind us, we now have a new list with more recent information that might highlight eventual winners. Tuesday was rough for oil and for oil-related shares, following a strong run for both during the preceding six trading sessions. West Texas crude oil for April delivery (XNYM:CLJ6) sank 4% to $36.50 a barrel. Oil has now fallen 1.5% this year. Euphoria springing from the change in tone among OPEC members and Russia, which were negotiating a freeze on oil production, subsided, at least for a day. Tomi Kilgore summed up the day’s action: “A pullback in crude-oil prices helped cap a historic run-up in the oil sector that was triggered by investors scrambling to close out bearish bets.” The oil industry’s two biggest problems, weak demand and oversupply, are still with us. U.S. shale producers have greatly reduced capital spending, and domestic production will eventually show a large decline. Still, growth of the U.S. economy may help spark demand. But surprisingly weak export figures out of China underline just how premature the oil rally may have been. On Jan. 11 we looked at the 67 companies in the S&P 500 energy and materials sectors (since the commodity decline has been broad), and listed the 10 (all oil-related) with the lowest levels of debt to equity as of Sept. 30. The idea was that those companies could survive a period of weak profits, and be ready to increase capital spending, acquire weaker competitors or scoop up production assets on the cheap before prices eventually rebound, as they always do. Here’s how the companies have performed since Jan. 8, the last trading day before we listed them: Company Ticker Industry Long-term debt/ equity - Sept. 30 Total return - Jan 8. through March 8 Helmerich & Payne Inc. (HP) Contract Drilling 10.9% 29% National Oilwell Varco Inc. (NOV) Oilfield Services/ Equipment 15.3% 5% Exxon Mobil Corp. (XOM) Integrated Oil 16.7% 12% Chevron Inc. (CVX) Integrated Oil 17.9% 9% Occidental Petroleum Corp. (OXY) Oil and Gas Production 19.6% 6% Baker Hughes Inc. (BHI) Oilfield Services/ Equipment 22.2% 6% Hess Corp. (HES) Oil and Gas Production 27.0% 7% Marathon Oil Corp. (MRO) Oil and Gas Production 30.4% -2% Valero Energy Corp. (VLO) Oil Refining/ Marketing 30.9% -8% Pioneer Natural Resources Co. (PXD) Oil and Gas Production 31.1% 8% Source: FactSet Positive returns for eight of 10 stocks over the course of two months would be remarkable for any stock picker. Of course, we didn’t pick them. The data did. And we also pointed out that these were best considered long-term plays. It’s easy to believe that over the next few years, oil prices will recovery significantly. After all, they always have after market disruptions. And despite all the commentary that the age of oil is ending, the great majority of engines continue to be powered by petroleum-based fuels. With another earnings season in the books, we prepared a new list of low-leverage companies in the energy and materials sectors. Two companies, Marathon Oil Corp. (MRO) and Pioneer Natural Resources Co. (PXD), dropped off the list, while Phillips 66 (PSX) and Marin Marietta Materials Inc. (MLM) were added. Rather than leave out any company, we expanded the list. Here are the 15 S&P 500 companies in the energy and materials sectors with the lowest ratios of long-term debt to equity as of Dec. 31: Company Ticker Industry Long-term debt/ equity - Dec. 31 Average return on equity - five years through December 2015 Total return - five years through March 8 Helmerich & Payne Inc. (HP) Contract Drilling 10.9% 14.3% 7% Exxon Mobil Corp. (XOM) Integrated Oil 22.6% 20.5% 13% National Oilwell Varco Inc. (NOV) Oilfield Services/ Equipment 24.0% 8.7% -52% Baker Hughes Inc. (BHI) Oilfield Services/ Equipment 24.8% 4.8% -32% Chevron Inc. (CVX) Integrated Oil 25.3% 14.9% 2% Hess Corp. (HES) Oil and Gas Production 34.2% 5.7% -41% Occidental Petroleum Corp. (OXY) Oil and Gas Production 34.2% 3.4% -20% Valero Energy Corp. (VLO) Oil Refining/ Marketing 35.9% 15.5% 181% Phillips 66 (PSX) Oil Refining/ Marketing 38.5% 18.5% N/A Martin Marietta Materials Inc. (MLM) Construction Materials 39.0% 6.4% 91% Marathon Oil Corp. (MRO) Oil and Gas Production 39.2% 3.9% -63% Mosaic Co. (MOS)   Chemicals: Agricultural 40.5% N/A -61% Pioneer Natural Resources Co. (PXD) Oil and Gas Production 43.7% 3.0% 29% Vulcan Materials Corp. (VMC) Construction Materials 44.5% 1.5% 138% FMC Technologies Inc. (FTI) Oilfield Services/ Equipment 46.0% 25.0% -48% Source: FactSet


Medina L.C.,University of Florida | Medina L.C.,Monsanto Corporation | Sartain J.B.,University of Florida | Obreza T.A.,University of Florida | And 2 more authors.
Journal of AOAC International | Year: 2014

Several technologies have been proposed to characterize the nutrient release patterns of slowrelease fertilizers (SRF) and controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) during the last few decades. These technologies have been developed mainly by manufacturers, and are product-specific, based on the regulation and analysis of each SRF and CRF product. Despite previous efforts to characterize SRF and CRF materials, no standardized, validated method exists to assess their nutrient release patterns. However, the increased production and distribution of these materials in specialty and nonspecialty markets requires an appropriate method to verify product claims and material performance. A soil incubation column leaching procedure was evaluated to determine its suitability as a standard method to estimate nitrogen (N) release patterns of SRFs and CRFs during 180 days. The influence of three soil/sand ratios, three incubation temperatures, and four soils on method behavior was assessed using five SRFs and three CRFs. In general, the highest soil/sand ratio increased the N release rate of all materials, but this effect was more marked for the SRFs. Temperature had the greatest influence on N release rates. For CRFs, the initial N release rates and the percentage N released/day increased as temperature increased. For SRFs, raising the temperature from 25 to 35°C increased initial N release rate and the total cumulative N released, and almost doubled the percentage released/day. The percentage N released/day from all products generally increased as the texture of the soil changed from sandy to loamy (Iowa>California>Pennsylvania>Florida). The soil incubation technique was demonstrated to be robust and reliable for characterizing N release patterns from SRFs and CRFs. The method was reproducible, and variations in soil/sand ratio, temperature, and soil had little effect on the results.


Sengupta D.,Louisiana State University | Pike R.W.,Louisiana State University | Hertwig T.A.,Mosaic Corporation
10AIChE - 2010 AIChE Spring Meeting and 6th Global Congress on Process Safety | Year: 2010

The rising price of natural gas and high emission rate of greenhouse gases from fossil fuels open new areas of research for sustainable alternatives. A wide variety of industrial chemicals are produced from petroleum based feedstock, which can be produced from biomass feedstock. The chemical production complex of 13 existing plants in the lower Mississippi River corridor is used as a base case, and new plants that can use biomass as raw materials are integrated into the existing plants. Sustainable costs are included with economic and environmental costs to demonstrate how new plants can be integrated into sustainable complexes. An integration of a plant for ethanol based on biomass feedstock will be a starting point for the production of the above commodity chemicals. New plants that use biomass as raw materials are integrated into the chemical production complex of existing plants in the lower Mississippi River corridor. A superstructure of plants includes the base case of existing plants, a transesterification process, a fermentation process, an anaerobic digestion process and a gasification process. The designs for the rest of the processes are presented. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the AIChE 2010 Spring National Meeting (San Antonio, TX 3/21-25/2010).


Medina L.C.,University of Florida | Medina L.C.,Monsanto Corporation | Sartain J.B.,University of Florida | Obreza T.A.,University of Florida | And 2 more authors.
Journal of AOAC International | Year: 2014

Several technologies have been proposed to characterize the nutrient release and availability patterns of enhanced-efficiency fertilizers (EEFs), especially slow-release fertilizers (SRFs) and controlled-release fertilizers (CRFs) during the last few decades. These technologies have been developed mainly by manufacturers and are productspecific based on the regulation and analysis of each EEF product. Despite previous efforts to characterize EEF materials, no validated method exists to assess their nutrient release patterns. However, the increased use of EEFs in specialty and nonspecialty markets requires an appropriate method to verify nutrient claims and material performance. A series of experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of temperature, fertilizer test portion size, and extraction time on the performance of a 74 h accelerated laboratory extraction method to measure SRF and CRF nutrient release profiles. Temperature was the only factor that influenced nutrient release rate, with a highly marked effect for phosphorus and to a lesser extent for nitrogen (N) and potassium. Based on the results, the optimal extraction temperature set was: Extraction No. 1-2:00 h at 25°C; Extraction No. 2-2:00 h at 50°C; Extraction No. 3-20:00 h at 55°C; and Extraction No. 4-50:00 h at 60°C. Ruggedness of the method was tested by evaluating the effect of small changes in seven selected factors on method behavior using a fractional multifactorial design. Overall, the method showed ruggedness for measuring N release rates of coated CRFs.


Medina L.C.,University of Florida | Medina L.C.,Monsanto Corporation | Sartain J.,University of Florida | Obreza T.,University of Florida | And 2 more authors.
Journal of AOAC International | Year: 2014

Several technologies have been proposed to characterize the nutrient release patterns of enhanced-efficiency fertilizers (EEFs) during the last few decades. These technologies have been developed mainly by manufacturers and are productspecific based on the regulation and analysis of each EEF product. Despite previous efforts to characterize nutrient release of slow-release fertilizer (SRF) and controlled-release fertilizer (CRF) materials, no official method exists to assess their nutrient release patterns. However, the increased production and distribution of EEFs in specialty and nonspecialty markets requires an appropriate method to verify nutrient claims and material performance. Nonlinear regression was used to establish a correlation between the data generated from a 180-day soil incubation-column leaching procedure and 74 h accelerated lab extraction method, and to develop a model that can predict the 180-day nitrogen (N) release curve for a specific SRF and CRF product based on the data from the accelerated laboratory extraction method. Based on the R2 > 0.90 obtained for most materials, results indicated that the data generated from the 74 h accelerated lab extraction method could be used to predict N release from the selected materials during 180 days, including those fertilizers that require biological activity for N release.


Trademark
MOSAIC Corporation | Date: 2012-03-07

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News Article | November 14, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

Ammonium phosphates are salts of ammonium and phosphoric acid. They are produced as ortho- (solid) forms and/or polyphosphate (fluid) forms by a reaction between ammonia and phosphoric acid. The solid form is the dominant type. Ammonium phosphates are highly unstable and are usually produced in long chain molecules to increase stability. Ammonium phosphates find application in fertilizers, flame retardants, food additives and emulsifiers. Ammonium phosphates are commercially available as mono-ammonium phosphate (MAP), di-ammonium phosphate (DAP) and ammonium polyphosphate. Mono-ammonium phosphate (MAP) and di-ammonium phosphate (DAP) are the commonly used types. Ammonium phosphates are primarily used for fertilizer applications and account for more than three quarters of the market volume. They are extensively used as a source for nitrogen as well as phosphorus. Both these nutrients are essential for proper growth of the crops. Ammonium phosphates deliver nitrogen and phosphorus nutrient to the soil in an absorbable form for the plant roots. The increasing demand for better yield from the limited amount of arable land area to provide food for the rapidly growing world population is expected to drive the ammonium phosphates market. However, harmful effects of over fertilization on the environment as well as the health of flora and fauna are expected to hamper the market growth. Development of formulations for efficient techniques such as fertigation and drip irrigation that utilize minimal quantities of inorganic fertilizers are expected to act as prospective market opportunities for further growth. Various industrial application of ammonium phosphates including fire control and flame-retardant applications are increasing globally at significant growth rate. However, there is a constant debate over the harmful effects of over fertilization with inorganic fertilizers. The excessive fertilization due to pressure on farmers to enhance yield from the limited amount of land is affecting the farm soil adversely. It is causing ground water poisoning and ocean dead zones. The Gulf of Mexico ocean dead zone is a prominent example of the adverse effects of leaching of fertilizers into water bodies. Furthermore, over fertilization leaves the soil unsuitable for farming and devoid of other micronutrients. It becomes toxic for the other organisms that contribute in minute ways to add nutrition to the soil. The market for ammonium phosphates can be segmented on the basis of product types into three key segments as, mono-ammonium phosphate (MAP), di-ammonium phosphate (DAP) and ammonium polyphosphate. Mono-ammonium phosphate (MAP) and di-ammonium phosphate (DAP) are completely used in fertilizers. Ammonium polyphosphate while being utilized mostly by fertilizer industry also goes into flame retardant formulations and food additives. In terms of geography, Asia Pacific is the largest consumer as well as producer of ammonium phosphate. Major agricultural economies including China, India, Pakistan and other South East Asian countries are the major consumers of fertilizers including ammonium phosphates. In North America, the U.S. is the major market. Corn and Soybean are the major crops that use inorganic fertilizers in the region. Mexico is another major market for ammonium phosphate fertilizers. Latin America is an extensive consumer of inorganic fertilizers for its large corn crops where Brazil is the largest consumer in the region followed by Argentina. While Middle East & Africa and Europe is expected to register steady growth. On global level the market is dominated by few players due to consolidation and acquisitions over the long life cycle of the fertilizer market. However, owing to the huge potential of the market it is partly fragmented with large number of local small and medium sized players who offer low cost generic formulations to the farmers. Key players in ammonium phosphates market include PotashCorp, Yara International, Mosaic Co., ICL, Haifa Chemical and Coromandel among many others.

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