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Wei J.,Purdue University | Hwang I.,Purdue University | Hall W.D.,Mosaic ATM
12th AIAA Aviation Technology, Integration and Operations (ATIO) Conference and 14th AIAA/ISSMO Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization Conference | Year: 2012

Dynamic airspace configuration research intends to organize and reconstruct the airspace to better accommodate the uneven traffic distribution, alleviate the demand-capacity imbalances, and thereby increase the throughput of the entire national airspace system. However, past research has mainly focused on en route airspace. In this paper, we propose a mathematical programming based algorithm for dynamic terminal airspace configuration. With the understanding of the current terminal airspace organization and terminal operations, we handle the altitude changes by vertical stratification, formulate the airspace sectorization problem as an optimization problem, include separation regulations, flight path requirements and geometric restrictions as constraints, and construct a mathematical program. By solving for its optimal solution, we generate terminal airspace sectors which can account for the major traffic flows and accommodate the traffic variations. A preliminary benefit analysis is conducted to show the promising benefits of the proposed algorithm. © 2012 by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc. All rights reserved. Source


Niedfeld P.,Brigham Young University | Beard R.,Brigham Young University | Morse B.,Brigham Young University | Pledgie S.,Mosaic ATM
Proceedings of the 2010 American Control Conference, ACC 2010 | Year: 2010

A reactive N-step look-ahead scheme is used to plan paths for an unmanned air-vehicle (UAV) to maximize the probability of successfully identifying an object on the surface. UAVs are used for reconnaissance, search and rescue, and surveillance missions where the quality of camera imagery can determine the success or failure of an operation. Reactive path planning and mathematical models for calculating the Probability of Detection, Recognition, and Identification (PDRI) have been studied independently, but never merged to plan paths for UAVs. Combining these techniques results in the highest probability of successful object identification from aerial video. We utilize the Targeting Task Performance (TTP) metric to estimate the P-DRI and successfully incorporate it into a look-ahead path planner. We present both simulation and experimental results. © 2010 AACC. Source


Chen H.,University of Minnesota | Zhao Y.J.,University of Minnesota | Provan C.,Mosaic ATM
AIAA Guidance, Navigation, and Control Conference 2011 | Year: 2011

This paper presents dynamic strategies for the integrated scheduling and runway assignment of both arrival and departure traffic over an airport. While a static scheduling scheme handles traffic over a specified planning horizon simultaneously, sequential dynamic schedulers divide the planning horizon into a series of smaller scheduling windows and apply a static scheduling scheme sequentially over each window. Dynamic scheduling strategies are desirable for obtaining real-time solutions of continual traffic streams and for taking advantage of updated traffic information. In this paper, a multiple-point scheduling framework is used in which scheduling locations include runway thresholds as well as fixes over the terminal airspace and gates on the airport surface. Integrated static scheduling of both arrival and departure traffic is formulated as mixed-integer linear programming (MILP). Solution variables include scheduled times of arrival (STA) at the multiple scheduling locations and aircraft sequences at merge points. In addition, aircraft route assignments for both ground and airborne traffic are included as discrete solution variables, from which optimal runway assignments can be determined. Then, different dynamic strategies with either overlapping or non-overlapping scheduling windows are developed and compared. Induced constraints for ensuring sufficient separations among traffic in neighboring windows are discussed. Real traffic data from the JFK airport is used in extensive numerical solutions to evaluate the computational speeds and scheduling performances of different dynamic strategies. © 2011 by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc. All rights reserved. Source


Chen H.,University of Minnesota | Zhao Y.J.,University of Minnesota | Provan C.,Mosaic ATM
Journal of Aircraft | Year: 2011

This paper presents a systematic study of the integrated scheduling and runway assignment of both arriving and departing traffic over an airport using a multiple-point scheduling scheme. Scheduling locations include runway thresholds as conventionally done and fixes over the terminal airspace and gates. This general runway scheduling problem is formulated as mixed-integer linear programming. Solution variables include scheduled times of arrival at the series of locations within a specified time window. In addition, both taxi and airborne routes for aircraft that are being scheduled are included as solution variables, from which optimal runway assignments can be determined. In this paper, the need for multiple-point integrated scheduling of both arriving and departing traffic is first discussed. Mathematical expressions of constraints and the optimization criterion are examined. Representation of the terminal route structure for solving this problem is explained. Real traffic data from the John F. Kennedy International airport is used in extensive numerical solutions to evaluate the computational speed and scheduling efficiency of different algorithms. Copyright © 2011 by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc. All rights reserved. Source


Zheng Q.,University of Minnesota | Zhao Y.J.,University of Minnesota | Capozzi B.,Mosaic ATM
AIAA Guidance, Navigation, and Control Conference | Year: 2010

Taxi conformance monitoring in air traffic surface operation determines if an aircraft is able to pass or arrive at specified target points on a taxi route on time. This paper presents a systematic procedure for taxi conformance monitoring. The proposed procedure is first based on predicting times of arrival (TOA) at a target point. Two different TOA prediction methods are presented: a dead-reckoning method and an intent modeling method. The dead-reckoning method assumes that the aircraft shall follow a constant speed in the near future. In comparison, the intent modeling method uses a dynamic speed profile that consists of a series of different speed segments. Both the taxi route geometry and aircraft performance capabilities are used in establishing the natures and magnitudes of these segments. Next, a taxi conformance monitoring criterion is introduced that takes into consideration the range of feasible aircraft times of arrival at the target point. It takes as inputs current measured aircraft states, aircraft speed limits, its maximum acceleration and deceleration capabilities, and distance to the target. Traffic data from the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) airport is used, together with Monte Carlo simulations over likely surveillance uncertainties, to evaluate the performances of the proposed methods in terms of TOA prediction accuracy, speed profile matching, and correct conformance prediction Copyright © 2010 by Qian Zheng, Yiyuan J. Zhao, and Brian Capozzi. Source

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