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FOSTER CITY, California, June 14, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- MORE Health, Inc. (www.morehealth.com) and Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. (www.castleconnolly.com) announced today that they have formed a strategic alliance to bring patients access to Castle Connolly Top Doctors® through MORE Health's collaborative diagnosis service. MORE Health has helped thousands of patients around the world suffering from serious illnesses access U.S. medical experts through its intuitive and powerful Physician Collaboration Platform. And Castle Connolly's mission is to help consumers find and access the nation's top doctors and medical care. "Castle Connolly has developed the most established and well-respected system of identifying top doctors," said Hope Lewis, CEO of MORE Health. "We are honored to form this alliance and to allow our patients the privilege of knowing that they are being served by America's Top Doctors." "We are delighted that MORE Health has turned us to help them identify the most outstanding physicians for people with serious illnesses seeking the very best in American medicine," said John J. Connolly, Ed.D., President & CEO of Castle Connolly. The importance of seeing a top doctor cannot be overstated. A comprehensive report by the National Academy of Science found that 12 million people in the United States are misdiagnosed annually, and misdiagnosis contributes to about 10% of all patient deaths. Through MORE Health, patients can have their diagnosis reviewed with the assurance of working with a Castle Connolly Top Doctor. Additional information is available at www.morehealth.com and www.castleconnolly.com. MORE Health's mission is to offer access to the best physicians in the world when they are needed the most; when you are faced with a critical, potentially life-changing illness, such as cancer or heart disease. Castle Connolly is the nation's trusted provider of information on top doctors, with detailed profiles of more than 50,000 outstanding physicians across the U.S. and across all medical specialties  identified on www.castleconnolly.com. It is the leading digital and print provider of information about top doctors, working with 50+ city and regional magazines, major newspapers, digital health companies and employers. Nominated by their peers and selected by the physician-led research team, doctors do not pay, and cannot pay, to be selected as a Castle Connolly Top Doctor. Contact William Liss-Levinson, Ph.D., 212.367.8400, ext. 114; bliss-levinson@castleconnolly.com


"Castle Connolly has developed the most established and well-respected system of identifying top doctors," said Hope Lewis, CEO of MORE Health. "We are honored to form this alliance and to allow our patients the privilege of knowing that they are being served by America's Top Doctors." "We are delighted that MORE Health has turned us to help them identify the most outstanding physicians for people with serious illnesses seeking the very best in American medicine," said John J. Connolly, Ed.D., President & CEO of Castle Connolly. The importance of seeing a top doctor cannot be overstated. A comprehensive report by the National Academy of Science found that 12 million people in the United States are misdiagnosed annually, and misdiagnosis contributes to about 10% of all patient deaths. Through MORE Health, patients can have their diagnosis reviewed with the assurance of working with a Castle Connolly Top Doctor. Additional information is available at www.morehealth.com and www.castleconnolly.com. MORE Health's mission is to offer access to the best physicians in the world when they are needed the most; when you are faced with a critical, potentially life-changing illness, such as cancer or heart disease. Castle Connolly is the nation's trusted provider of information on top doctors, with detailed profiles of more than 50,000 outstanding physicians across the U.S. and across all medical specialties  identified on www.castleconnolly.com. It is the leading digital and print provider of information about top doctors, working with 50+ city and regional magazines, major newspapers, digital health companies and employers. Nominated by their peers and selected by the physician-led research team, doctors do not pay, and cannot pay, to be selected as a Castle Connolly Top Doctor. Contact William Liss-Levinson, Ph.D., 212.367.8400, ext. 114; bliss-levinson@castleconnolly.com To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/more-health-and-castle-connolly-form-strategic-alliance-to-deliver-patients-access-to-americas-top-doctors-300473897.html SOURCE Castle Connolly Medical Ltd.; MORE Health, Inc.


Roaldset J.O.,MORE Health | Roaldset J.O.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | Roaldset J.O.,University of Oslo | Linaker O.M.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | And 2 more authors.
BMC Psychiatry | Year: 2014

Background: Biological factors have been associated with deliberate self-harm (DSH) but have not been integrated with clinical factors in routine risk assessments.This study aimed to examine the incremental validity of lipid levels and platelet serotonin when combined with psychosocial factors in risk assessments for repeated admissions due to DSH.Methods: In this prospective observational study of 196 acutely admitted patients, results of blood tests performed upon admission and the MINI Suicidal Scale and psychosocial DSH risk factor assessments performed at discharge were compared with the incidence of DSH recorded during the first 3 and 12 months after discharge.Results: High triglyceride levels were found to be a significant marker for patients admitted 3 or more times due to DSH (repeated DSH, DSH-R) when tested against other significant risk factors. When all (9) significant univariate factors associated with 12-month post-discharge DSH-R were analyzed in a multivariate logistic regression, the MINI Suicidal Scale (p = 0.043), a lack of insight (p = 0.040), and triglyceride level (p = 0.020) remained significant. The estimated 12-month area under the curve of the receiver operator characteristic (ROC-AUC) for DSH-R was 0.74 for triglycerides, 0.81 for the MINI, 0.89 for the MINI + psychosocial factors, and 0.91 for the MINI + psychosocial factors + triglycerides. The applied multifaceted approach also significantly discriminated between 12-month post-discharge DSH-R patients and other DSH patients, and a lack of insight (p = 0.047) and triglycerides (p = 0.046) remained significant for DSH-R patients in a multivariate analysis in which other DSH patients served as the reference group (rather than non-DSH patients).Conclusion: The triglyceride values provided incremental validity to the MINI Suicidal Scale and psychosocial risk factors in the assessment of the risk of repeated DSH. Therefore, a bio-psychosocial approach appears promising, but further research is necessary to refine and validate this method. © 2014 Roaldset et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Nilsen E.,MORE Health | Aasterod M.,University of Oslo | Hustad P.S.,Axbit A S | Olsen A.O.,University of Oslo
Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy | Year: 2016

Objectives: Mecillinam is highly active in vitro against Chlamydia spp. We aimed to determine whether mecillinam should be evaluated further as treatment for genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Patients and methods: The study was conducted at an open-access clinic for sexually transmitted infections in Oslo, Norway. We planned to include 50 patients. Participants were asymptomatic, heterosexual male patients with a first-void urine sample found to be positive for C. trachomatis by PCR. Treatment consisted of 400 mg of pivmecillinam hydrochloride three times a day for 7 days. A test-of-cure sample, a medication diary and a questionnaire were returned by the participants, and they were used to evaluate treatment outcome, compliance, risk of reinfection and theoretical percentage of time above MIC (t/MIC %). The study was registered in Eudra-CT (no. 2013-002379-179) and clinicaltrals.gov (NCT02083276). Results: The study was discontinued after including 20 patients, due to a high failure rate. Only two of the 17 participants who delivered a test-of-cure sample were cured. Three participants reported condomless sex before the follow-up sample. When the average or most favourable pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD) reported from other studies were applied in a theoretical model, the estimated t/MIC % was above 50% for all of the 15 participants returning a medication diary. Using the least favourable PK/PD, no participant had t/MIC % of >36%. The mean dose interval was 8 h 36 min (standard deviation 3 h 12 min). Conclusions: A low cure rate combined with uncertainty about intracellular availability and attained t/MIC % makes mecillinam an unattractive candidate for further evaluation as treatment for genital C. trachomatis infection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.


Graesdal A.,Vestfold Indremedisinske Senter | Bogsrud M.P.,University of Oslo | Bogsrud M.P.,MORE Health | Holven K.B.,University of Oslo | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Clinical Lipidology | Year: 2012

Background: Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), which affects 1 in a million individuals, leads to extremely elevated levels of cholesterol and early-onset cardiovascular disease. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess all 7 HoFH patients treated with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis in Norway with respect to quality of life, clinical and laboratory assessments, and cardiovascular status. Methods: Apheresis treatment and assessment of cardiovascular status was performed at local hospitals but coordinated by the Lipid Clinic that has followed all patients since diagnosis. Quality of life was evaluated by a validated questionnaire. Results: Results are shown as median (min-max). LDL cholesterol at diagnosis (untreated) was 704 (592-1268) mg/dL (18.2 [15.3-32.8] mmol/L). Medication was initiated at age 9 (2-35) years, and apheresis treatment at age 10 (6-44) years. Regular once-weekly apheresis combined with the maximum-tolerable doses of a statin and ezetimibe reduced LDL cholesterol to 197 (170-282) mg/dL (5.1 [4.5-7.3] mmol/L) pre-apheresis and 85 (50-108) mg/dL (2.2 [1.3-2.8] mmol/L) post-apheresis. Calculated interval mean LDL cholesterol was 162 (135-220) mg/dL (4.2 [3.5-5.7] mmol/L). Duration of apheresis treatment was 11 (1-24) years. Cardiovascular manifestations progressed in most patients despite the apheresis treatment. The subjects' quality of life was comparable with that of a healthy population, with the exception of two patients, who were significantly affected by coronary disease. Conclusions: Well-tolerated, once-weekly LDL apheresis achieves lower interval mean LDL cholesterol levels between apheresis treatments than previously reported for apheresis every second week. However, progressions of cardiovascular manifestations still occurred, which highlights the importance of earlier and even more aggressive treatment and follow-up in HoFH. © 2012 National Lipid Association. All rights reserved.


Andersen F.H.,MORE Health | Andersen F.H.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | Flaatten H.,University of Bergen | Klepstad P.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | And 4 more authors.
Annals of Intensive Care | Year: 2015

Background: Comparison of survival and quality of life in a mixed ICU population of patients 80 years of age or older with a matched segment of the general population. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed survival of ICU patients ≥80 years admitted to the Haukeland University Hospital in 2000–2012. We prospectively used the EuroQol-5D to compare the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) between survivors at follow-up and an age- and gender-matched general population. Follow-up was 1–13.8 years. Results: The included 395 patients (mean age 83.8 years, 61.0 % males) showed an overall survival of 75.9 (ICU), 59.5 (hospital), and 42.0 % 1 year after the ICU. High ICU mortality was predicted by age, mechanical ventilator support, SAPS II, maximum SOFA, and multitrauma with head injury. High hospital mortality was predicted by an unplanned surgical admission. One-year mortality was predicted by respiratory failure and isolated head injury. We found no differences in HRQOL at follow-up between survivors (n = 58) and control subjects (n = 179) or between admission categories. Of the ICU non-survivors, 63.2 % died within 2 days after ICU admission (n = 60), and 68.3 % of these had life-sustaining treatment (LST) limitations. LST limitations were applied for 71.3 % (n = 114) of the hospital non-survivors (ICU 70.5 % (n = 67); post-ICU 72.3 % (n = 47)). Conclusions: Overall 1-year survival was 42.0 %. Survival rates beyond that were comparable to those of the general octogenarian population. Among survivors at follow-up, HRQOL was comparable to that of the age- and sex-matched general population. Patients admitted for planned surgery had better short- and long-term survival rates than those admitted for medical reasons or unplanned surgery for 3 years after ICU admittance. The majority of the ICU non-survivors died within 2 days, and most of these had LST limitation decisions. © 2015, Andersen et al.


PubMed | MORE Health and Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nordic journal of psychiatry | Year: 2016

Limited information exists regarding the associations between impairment, symptoms, helpfulness of treatments, and service needs after initial treatment of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).The aims of this study were to examine persistence rates and associations between parent-reported symptoms, impairment, helpfulness of treatments, and service needs in a retrospective follow-up study of children with ADHD.Parents of 214 children with a mean age of 12.6 years (SD=2.1) who were diagnosed with ADHD at five child and adolescent mental health clinics (CAMHS) completed questionnaires 1-10 years (mean=3.7 years, SD=2.2) after baseline assessment. The response rate was 43.4%. A community comparison group (n=110) was recruited from the same area.Approximately two-thirds (60.3%) of the sample fulfilled the DSM-IV symptom criteria of ADHD at follow-up, 84.3% were functionally impaired, and most children (84.7%) were on medication. Inattentive and emotional symptoms were the strongest predictors of impairment across impairment areas. Perceived helpfulness of different treatments varied from 71.8-88.7%, and no significant difference was found between the ADHD sub-groups regarding reported helpfulness. Adjustment of the school situation was the most frequent service need, and approximately half of the parents reported needs for care co-ordination. Children fulfilling the symptom criteria of the ADHD Combined sub-group were most impaired and had most service needs.At follow-up, children were highly symptomatic and impaired, despite a high rate of persistent medication treatment. The findings underline the need for more tailored treatment and co-ordinated care over time.


Some patients with severe mental disorders are refractory to psychotherapeutic or psychopharmacological interventions. We present a patient who at the age of 19 developed several schizophrenia - suspect symptoms. Soon inexplicable general seizures where observed. He was treated with antipsychotics, but had two bouts of malignant neuroleptic syndrome. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) gave some symptom relief and he continued on maintenance ECT for years with weekly intervals. Interruption of this treatment pattern rapidly increased symptom load. After seven years a lorazepam provocation test was performed as he had a new relapse after 3 weeks without ECT. In the ensuing hours his aggressiveness and nonsense speaking rapidly diminished. Kahlbaums observation of seizures as part of a catatonia was not understood in this case. The publication of the new DSM-V diagnosis of catatonia may hopefully reduce the probability of treating a patient for schizophrenia for years without access to a more targeted medication and ECT plan. © J.E. Berg, 2014.


Patent
MORE Health | Date: 2015-03-13

Systems and methods of the present invention enable low latency viewing of medical images over a network and therefore can fulfill the functionality that is required for an international DICOM viewing platform. The system includes a server and a client that communicates with each other in the background and reduces image viewing latency in multiple aspects. When a user contacts the server using a web browser, the server sends the client to the users computer over the network. The client runs from the browser and will send signals to the server to allow the server to load data into memory from storage one or more steps before the user requests the data, reducing latency on the server. The client will download and cache image data one or more steps before the user begins to view the images, and as a result latency from network transmission is also reduced.


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