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News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Moorfields was named International Eye Clinic of the Year (for the second consecutive year) by medical travel publication the International Medical Travel Journal Medical Travel Awards 2017 (http://awards.imtj.com) at their annual awards ceremony, the IMTJ Medical Travel Awards 2017. The awards were presented in April at a high profile reception in Opatija, Croatia during the IMTJ Medical Travel Summit, which brought together all the pre-eminent providers and experts in medical travel and medical tourism sectors. The Awards were generously supported by Primorje-Gorski Kotar County. The award was given to Moorfields in recognition of the hospital's success in attracting and serving international patients (medical tourists), supported by the evidence of the numbers and type of medical tourists/patients treated and country of origin, quality and range of services provided and patient satisfaction. Moorfields beat similar hospitals/clinics from around the world to clinch the award. Maha Aboughali, Business Development & Marketing Director at Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai, comments: "Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai is delighted to be presented with this prestigious international award for a second consecutive year, for our work and commitment to supporting international healthcare tourism in Dubai. This award comes 10 years after we established Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai as the first overseas branch of Moorfields and so it has special significance for the team." Chairman of the judging panel and Managing Editor of IMTJ Keith Pollard says the awards celebrate the best providers in the industry and aim to encourage others to strive to match them: "Medical travel is an exciting and growing global industry, with many providers delivering excellence in both medical care and customer service. The IMTJ Medical Travel Awards are the only independent awards to recognise those who are the best of the best - and hopefully will encourage others to emulate their success. The judges wanted to reward innovation and excellence, highlight best practice and celebrate those who are leading the way in the industry and delivering successful outcomes for patients. "All our winners exemplify the way the medical tourism industry should be run - professional, offering exceptional patient care and providing the best possible  medical outcomes. I'm already looking forward to next year's awards in the hope that other clinics and companies will have raised their game to match or even better this year's winners." Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai is the first overseas branch of the Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London. The hospital provides the full spectrum of eye care related services from basic screening to complex eye surgeries, managed through a resident team of Consultant Ophthalmologists. The hospital has replicated the excellent standards of the London hospital, relating to clinical care, training, teaching, as well as research. Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai meets these standards, while patient care revolves around exceeding patient expectations and providing a customised VIP service. Since 2007, Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai has treated more than 150,000 patients from 185 countries, many from the GCC and wider Middle East region. Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai (MEHD) is the first overseas branch of Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, the oldest and one of the largest centres for ophthalmic treatment, teaching and research in the world. Located at the Al Razi Medical Complex in Dubai Health Care City, the facility provides day case surgery and outpatient diagnostic and treatment services, for a variety of surgical and non-surgical eye conditions. MEHD will also raise standards for research and teaching in the region. MEHD is owned and managed by the NHS Foundation Trust, and maintains close links with London, to ensure that patients in the GCC receive the best eye care treatment in the world. The International Medical Travel Journal ( www.imtj.com) provides insight into the medical travel and medical tourism sector. IMTJ was established in 2007 in response to the increasing interest in medical travel and medical tourism. It embraces many of the themes that challenge healthcare providers across the world - insurance, accreditation, marketing and promotion, quality, patient safety, levels of care and experience in treating international patients. IMTJ is independent of the associations and special interest groups that have come aboard the medical tourism bandwagon. Our aim is to create a central focus for information, resources and opinion on medical travel for those involved in the industry, anywhere in the world. The internationalisation of healthcare through health tourism is at the heart of IMTJ. Patients are becoming healthcare consumers and in many countries, patient choice is being extended to surgery and treatment provided by international hospitals and clinics. By sharing expertise, knowledge, and views about the health travel industry, IMTJ helps to ensure that patient expectations are met, and that the industry maintains a high reputation. The International Medical Travel Journal (IMTJ) is owned and managed by Intuition Communication, a specialist publisher of consumer and business-to-business information on private healthcare and medical travel. The company also operates a consumer facing portal for medical tourism - Treatment Abroad.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Moorfields was named International Eye Clinic of the Year (for the second consecutive year) by medical travel publication the International Medical Travel Journal Medical Travel Awards 2017 (http://awards.imtj.com) at their annual awards ceremony, the IMTJ Medical Travel Awards 2017. The awards were presented in April at a high profile reception in Opatija, Croatia during the IMTJ Medical Travel Summit, which brought together all the pre-eminent providers and experts in medical travel and medical tourism sectors. The Awards were generously supported by Primorje-Gorski Kotar County. The award was given to Moorfields in recognition of the hospital's success in attracting and serving international patients (medical tourists), supported by the evidence of the numbers and type of medical tourists/patients treated and country of origin, quality and range of services provided and patient satisfaction. Moorfields beat similar hospitals/clinics from around the world to clinch the award. Maha Aboughali, Business Development & Marketing Director at Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai, comments: "Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai is delighted to be presented with this prestigious international award for a second consecutive year, for our work and commitment to supporting international healthcare tourism in Dubai. This award comes 10 years after we established Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai as the first overseas branch of Moorfields and so it has special significance for the team." Chairman of the judging panel and Managing Editor of IMTJ Keith Pollard says the awards celebrate the best providers in the industry and aim to encourage others to strive to match them: "Medical travel is an exciting and growing global industry, with many providers delivering excellence in both medical care and customer service. The IMTJ Medical Travel Awards are the only independent awards to recognise those who are the best of the best - and hopefully will encourage others to emulate their success. The judges wanted to reward innovation and excellence, highlight best practice and celebrate those who are leading the way in the industry and delivering successful outcomes for patients. "All our winners exemplify the way the medical tourism industry should be run - professional, offering exceptional patient care and providing the best possible  medical outcomes. I'm already looking forward to next year's awards in the hope that other clinics and companies will have raised their game to match or even better this year's winners." Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai is the first overseas branch of the Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London. The hospital provides the full spectrum of eye care related services from basic screening to complex eye surgeries, managed through a resident team of Consultant Ophthalmologists. The hospital has replicated the excellent standards of the London hospital, relating to clinical care, training, teaching, as well as research. Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai meets these standards, while patient care revolves around exceeding patient expectations and providing a customised VIP service. Since 2007, Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai has treated more than 150,000 patients from 185 countries, many from the GCC and wider Middle East region. Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai (MEHD) is the first overseas branch of Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, the oldest and one of the largest centres for ophthalmic treatment, teaching and research in the world. Located at the Al Razi Medical Complex in Dubai Health Care City, the facility provides day case surgery and outpatient diagnostic and treatment services, for a variety of surgical and non-surgical eye conditions. MEHD will also raise standards for research and teaching in the region. MEHD is owned and managed by the NHS Foundation Trust, and maintains close links with London, to ensure that patients in the GCC receive the best eye care treatment in the world. The International Medical Travel Journal ( www.imtj.com) provides insight into the medical travel and medical tourism sector. IMTJ was established in 2007 in response to the increasing interest in medical travel and medical tourism. It embraces many of the themes that challenge healthcare providers across the world - insurance, accreditation, marketing and promotion, quality, patient safety, levels of care and experience in treating international patients. IMTJ is independent of the associations and special interest groups that have come aboard the medical tourism bandwagon. Our aim is to create a central focus for information, resources and opinion on medical travel for those involved in the industry, anywhere in the world. The internationalisation of healthcare through health tourism is at the heart of IMTJ. Patients are becoming healthcare consumers and in many countries, patient choice is being extended to surgery and treatment provided by international hospitals and clinics. By sharing expertise, knowledge, and views about the health travel industry, IMTJ helps to ensure that patient expectations are met, and that the industry maintains a high reputation. The International Medical Travel Journal (IMTJ) is owned and managed by Intuition Communication, a specialist publisher of consumer and business-to-business information on private healthcare and medical travel. The company also operates a consumer facing portal for medical tourism - Treatment Abroad.


Commenting on Dr. Fiorentini's appointment, Mr. Mariano Gonzalez, Managing Director of Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai, said: "We are delighted to welcome Dr. Fiorentini to Moorfields where her valuable skills and experience will benefit patients at Moorfields, as well as children treated at Al Jalila Children's Specialty Hospital in Dubai." In 2016, Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai and Al Jalila Children's Specialty Hospital in Dubai (the UAE's first dedicated paediatric hospital) announced an agreement under which Moorfields now provides a comprehensive range of paediatric ophthalmology services to patients at Al Jalila Children's Specialty Hospital. Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai (MEHD) is the first overseas branch of Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, the oldest and one of the largest centres for ophthalmic treatment, teaching and research in the world. Located at the Al Razi Medical Complex in Dubai Health Care City, the facility provides day case surgery and outpatient diagnostic and treatment services, for a variety of surgical and non-surgical eye conditions. MEHD will also raise standards for research and teaching in the region. MEHD is owned and managed by the NHS Foundation Trust, and maintains close links with London, to ensure that patients in the GCC receive the best eye care treatment in the world.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.4.4-1 | Award Amount: 5.57M | Year: 2012

This project will undertake preclinical and clinical research of the Orphan Drug Polihexanide (PHMB). The main objective is to provide a safe and effective drug for the treatment of the rare ocular disease Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) tested according to international regulatory standards. This debilitating infectious disease is caused by a free living protozoan which, in the absence of treatment, can have catastrophic consequences such as severe pain, visual loss and eye enucleation. There are no approved drugs to treat this disease. After Orphan Drug Designation Protocol Assistance was requested from the European Medicines Agency on our drug development research plan. The proposed protocol incorporates the EMA advice and will include a non-clinical phase, a double-blind placebo controlled Phase I trial and a randomised double-blind, active controlled, parallel groups Phase 3 study (efficacy and safety therapeutic confirmatory study). The primary deliverables will be: 1) experimental scientific evidence on the quality, safety and efficacy of PHMB to provide the basis for a Marketing Authorisation within 5 years; 2) recommendations aiming to improve clinical practices in the management of AK based on the efficacy and safety evidence. ODAK is an industry led project mobilising the critical mass of industrial, pharmaceutical and academic expertise. needed to develop and optimise therapeutic approaches to alleviate the severe negative impacts of AK on the health and quality of life of patients. In particular, through identifying optimal PHMB formulations and recommending the best dose-benefit treatment regimes. ODAK directly contributes to the International Rare Diseases Research Consortium goal towards 200 new therapies. An estimated 95% of the total estimated EU contribution to the project will go to industrial partners (of this 32% goes to SMEs). The industrial strength assures a rapid translation of research to market application.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.2.4.3-1 | Award Amount: 7.76M | Year: 2012

Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the leading cause of blindness among working-age individuals in developed countries has been classically considered to be a microcirculatory disease of the retina. However, there is growing evidence to suggest that retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of DR. For this reason, it is reasonable to hypothesize that therapeutic strategies based on neuroprotection will be effective not only in preventing or arresting retinal neurodegeneration but also in preventing the development and progression of the early stages of DR (ie. microaneurysms and/or retinal thickness). EUROCONDOR (European Consortium for the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy) is a solid and well balanced consortium (ophthalmologists, endocrinologists, basic researchers) which has been created in order to implement the first clinical trial using eye drops for treatment of the early stages of DR. The participants are top leaders in their field and central readings will be performed by the Coordinating Centre of the European Vision Institute Clinical Research Network (EVICR.Net). The main objectives of the project are the following: Primary objective: To assess whether the selected neuroprotective drugs (brimonidine and somatostatin) administered topically are able to prevent or arrest neurodegeneration, as well as the development and progression of the early stages of DR. Secondary objectives: 1) To determine the prevalence of functional abnormalities related to neurodegeneration in those patients without or with minimal microvascular damage under ophthalmoscopic examination. 2) To compare the effectiveness of the selected drugs. 3) To evaluate the local and systemic adverse effects of the selected drugs. 4) To identify those patients most prone to progressive worsening (characterization of phenotypes and circulating biomarkers). 5) To determine the molecular mechanisms by which the selected drugs exert their beneficial effects.


Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the worlds most important age-related blinding disorder. The current proposal utilises epidemiological data describing clinical phenotype, molecular genetics, lifestyle, nutrition, and in-depth retinal imaging derived from existing longitudinal European epidemiological cohorts and biobanks to provide three major insights needed for long-lasting prevention and therapy for AMD: (a) the development of robust algorithms utilising genetic and non-genetic risk factors to identify personalised risks of developing advanced wet and dry AMD; (b) the identification of novel biomarkers for further stratification of disease risks. New insights from (a)\(b) will be used to elaborate preventive medical recommendations for highrisk subgroups of AMD patients; and (c) the identification of molecular drivers/biological pathways relevant for onset and progression of advanced AMD that will be used to identify and validate new therapeutic targets. Key deliverables are: 1. Determination of AMD frequency in Europe, and assessment of AMD risk for phenotypical, genetic, environmental, and biochemical risk factors and their interaction. (WP1-3) 2. Development of a web-based prediction model for personalised risk assessment of AMD based on integration of risk profiles derived from retinal imaging, molecular genetics, assessment of lifestyle, and biochemical testing. (WP4) 3. Modelling and functional characterisation of pathophysiological pathways identified from integrated analysis of current knowledge and the above risk profiles. (WP5) 4. Experimental testing and interpretation of pathophysiological consequences of risks at the molecular level. (WP6) 5. An extension and refinement of the prediction model (WP4) based on work in WP5 and WP6 to generate clinical guidelines for the medical management of high-risk subgroups of patients with AMD. (WP7) 6. Promotion and dissemination of newly gained knowledge towards AMD prevention and therapy development


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.4.4-1 | Award Amount: 7.74M | Year: 2012

Neovascular glaucoma (NVG) is a very aggressive and rare type of glaucoma: yet, it contributes disproportionately to blindness from all eye diseases. NVG is also the second most common cause for the removal of the eye-ball across all eye diseases, usually because of intractable pain. The major cause of NVG is Ischaemic Central Retinal Vein Occlusion (CRVO) leading to neovascularisation, obstruction of aqueous humour outflow and increased intraocular pressure. Todays therapeutic approaches are insufficient: they include destruction of the retina by coagulation, or off-label anti-VEGF injection into the eye. It is proposed to develop a better treatment by assessing the topical administration of Aganirsen: it is an antisense oligonucleotide able to interrupt the production of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, which plays a major role in the pathogenesis of NVG. Aganirsen is developed by GENE SIGNAL, a SME with expertise in topical ophthalmic treatments for orphan diseases, and manufactured by AMATSI. Under the coordination of the Mainz University Medical Center, a Phase II/III randomised, double-masked, 3-group, placebo-controlled trial (STRONG) is therefore presented to assess Aganirsens efficacy in reducing the rate of anterior and posterior segment neovascularisation and NVG development after CRVO. Involving 333 subjects within more than 30 clinical sites, the study is operationalized via a disease specific network (EVICR.net) and a contract research organization managed by GENE SIGNAL. The study aims at assessing a new therapeutic approach for NVG for which conditional authorization will be sought at the end of the project. STRONG also delivers new insights into the natural course of the disease and its risk factors, analysing one of the largest patient cohorts ever. It also allows for a novel classification of NVG, yields novel image analysis tools, and proposes biomarkers able to differentiate between high- and low-risk patients and drug responders.


Mitry D.,Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) | Year: 2013

Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) is one of the most common occurring retinal vascular abnormalities. The pathogenesis of BRVO is thought to involve both retinal vein compression and damage to the vessel wall, possibly leading to thrombus formation at sites where retinal arterioles cross retinal veins. The most common cause of visual loss in patients with BRVO is macular oedema (MO). Grid or focal laser photocoagulation has been shown to reduce the risk of visual loss and improve visual acuity (VA) in up to two thirds of individuals with MO secondary to BRVO, however, limitations to this treatment exist and newer modalities have suggested equal or improved efficacy. Recently, antiangiogenic therapy with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) has been used successfully to treat MO resulting from a variety of causes. As elevated intraocular levels of VEGF have been demonstrated in patients with retinal vein occlusions there is a strong basis for the hypothesis that anti-VEGF agents may be beneficial in the treatment of vascular leakage and MO. To investigate the efficacy and safety of intravitreal anti-VEGF agents for preserving or improving vision in the treatment of MO secondary to BRVO. We searched CENTRAL of any prior treatment.


Rajendram R.,Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) | Year: 2012

Thyroid eye disease is an autoimmune inflammatory condition of the orbital and periorbital tissues. Orbital radiotherapy is an anti-inflammatory treatment used in the treatment of active thyroid eye disease. It is administered as an outpatient procedure in 10 to 12 fractionated doses. To assess the effectiveness and adverse events of orbital radiotherapy in thyroid eye disease. The effectiveness was dependent on the level of 'success' of the intervention predefined in each randomised controlled trial (RCT). We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 2), MEDLINE (January 1950 to March 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to March 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to March 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not restrict the electronic searches for trials by date or language. We last searched the electronic databases on 12 March 2012. We screened reference lists of reports of included studies, other reviews and book chapters to find additional trials. We contacted trial investigators and experts in the field to identify additionally published studies. We included RCTs of orbital radiotherapy versus sham radiotherapy or other interventions enrolling adults, with a minimum of three months' follow-up and an endpoint of two years or less post treatment. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Trial authors were contacted for missing data. The risk ratio was used for our primary outcome. For our secondary outcomes, the odds ratio and mean difference were reported where possible. We obtained full-text copies of nine potential studies and included five trials with a total of 244 participants in this review. Orbital radiotherapy was compared to sham radiotherapy in two studies and to glucocorticoids in three studies, as a monotherapy or combination therapy. There was heterogeneity (as defined in our protocol) of trial outcome measures. Our primary outcome of a composite score was used in the two trials comparing radiotherapy versus sham radiotherapy and showed a risk ratio of success of 1.92 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.27 to 2.91) in favour of orbital radiotherapy. The primary outcome was not used in the other three trials. This review found that orbital radiotherapy is more effective than sham radiotherapy for the treatment of mild-to-moderate thyroid eye disease. In a single trial no difference between radiotherapy and steroid monotherapy was found. A meta-analysis of our secondary outcome of disease severity was not possible but results from individual trials suggest a better outcome with combination treatment with steroids versus steroids alone. No significant changes in quality-of-life scores following treatment with radiotherapy versus alternative treatments were found. Short-term adverse events related to radiotherapy that were reported were local and mild but long-term data were lacking and development of retinal changes following radiotherapy was not reported on.


Minakaran N.,Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
The Cochrane database of systematic reviews | Year: 2013

Thyroid associated ophthalmopathy (TAO) is the most frequent extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease, affecting up to 50% of patients, and has a great impact on quality of life. Rituximab is a human/murine chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets CD20, a transmembrane protein expressed on the surface of pre-B and mature B lymphocytes, but not on stem cells, pro-B lymphocytes or plasma cells. Preliminary work has shown that blocking the CD20 receptor on B-lymphocytes with rituximab affects the clinical course of TAO, by reducing inflammation and the degree of proptosis. The aim of this review was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of rituximab for the treatment of TAO. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 3), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE, (January 1950 to April 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to April 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to April 2013), OpenGrey (System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe) (www.opengrey.eu/), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en) and the EU Clinical Trials Register (www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 15 April 2013. We manually searched references of review articles and used the Science Citation Index to identify additional studies citing trials. We contacted the lead investigators of relevant trials on ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP for information and data from as yet unpublished clinical trials. We contacted experts in the field for information about any ongoing trials. We contacted the manufacturers of rituximab for details of any sponsored trials. We sought to include randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of rituximab treatment by intravenous infusion for the treatment of patients with TAO, compared with placebo or intravenous glucocorticoid treatment. Two review authors independently scanned titles and abstracts, as well as independently screened the full reports of the potentially relevant studies. At each stage, the results were compared and disagreements were solved by discussion. No studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. There are three ongoing studies which are likely to meet inclusion criteria once published, and thus be included in future updates of this review. There is currently insufficient evidence to support the use of rituximab in patients with TAO. There is a need for large RCTs, investigating rituximab versus placebo or corticosteroids in patients with active TAO to make adequate judgement on the efficacy and safety of this novel therapy for this condition.

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