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News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

ST. LOUIS, Feb. 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Stereotaxis, Inc. (OTCQX:STXS), a global leader in innovative robotic technologies for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, and the Montreal Heart Institute (MHI), an internationally recognized research leader and specialty hospital dedicated to the advancement of cardiology, today announced that the hospital is now performing ablation procedures using its newly installed Niobe® ES and the Vdrive® robotic systems.  MHI is the first hospital in the province of Quebec to offer Stereotaxis technologies for use in catheter ablation procedures to treat various types of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, including in patients with the most complex forms of congenital heart disease. This state-of-the-art lab also contains the latest technologies for imaging and 3D mapping.  Affiliated with Université de Montréal, MHI is one of the largest cardiac institutes worldwide, with electrophysiology (EP) as one of its main pillars in clinical care, research, and innovation. “Implementation of these leading-edge technologies is a major advancement for our arrhythmia program that will benefit patients not only in Quebec but around the globe,” said Dr. Paul Khairy, arrhythmia specialist and Scientific Director of the MHI Adult Congenital Center.  “There is an urgent need to improve the way we treat arrhythmias in people born with complex forms of heart disease.  In some cases, life-threatening arrhythmias cannot be reached by standard methods due to distorted or obstructed structures, patches, conduits, or baffles.  The robotic magnetic-guided Stereotaxis system allows us to navigate catheters with great precision through these complex anatomies safely and effectively.  We have already successfully treated patients with severe forms of congenital heart disease for whom catheter ablation likely would not have been a viable option without the sophisticated capabilities of this magnetic navigation platform.” “The majority of children born with heart defects are now surviving into their adult years, giving rise to a rapidly growing population of patients with congenital heart disease," stated Dr. Denis Roy, President and CEO of the MHI.  "Considering that arrhythmias are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in this population, it is critical to have an effective solution that addresses these complex problems.  Innovations such as these, made possible in part by Dr. Khairy's major grant from the Canadian Foundation for Innovation, allow our program to offer such leading-edge care.” Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most prevalent type of birth defect, afflicting approximately 1% of the Canadian population.  Whereas a few decades ago, most people with severe forms of congenital heart disease died during childhood, over 90% now survive into adulthood.  Arrhythmias are the most common complication encountered and often occur in a context that renders conventional therapies unsuitable or ineffective. About the Montreal Heart Institute Founded in 1954 by Dr. Paul David, the Montreal Heart Institute constantly aims for the highest standards of excellence in the cardiovascular field through its leadership in clinical and basic research, ultra-specialized care, professional training and prevention. It is part of the broad network of health excellence made up of Université de Montréal and its affiliated institutions.  According to Research Infosource, the Montreal Heart Institute has been ranked the number one research hospital in Canada for research intensity and funding per researcher. About Stereotaxis Stereotaxis is the global leader in innovative robotic technologies designed to enhance the treatment of arrhythmias and perform endovascular procedures. Its mission is the discovery, development and delivery of robotic systems, instruments, and information solutions for the interventional laboratory. These innovations help physicians provide unsurpassed patient care with robotic precision and safety, improved lab efficiency and productivity, and enhanced integration of procedural information. Over 100 issued patents support the Stereotaxis platform. The core components of Stereotaxis’ systems have received regulatory clearance in the United States, European Union, Japan, Canada, China, and elsewhere. For more information, please visit www.stereotaxis.com. This press release includes statements that may constitute "forward-looking" statements, usually containing the words "believe”, "estimate”, "project”, "expect" or similar expressions. Forward-looking statements inherently involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements. Factors that would cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, the Company's ability to raise additional capital on a timely basis and on terms that are acceptable, its ability to continue to manage expenses and cash burn rate at sustainable levels, its ability to continue to work with lenders to extend, repay or refinance indebtedness, or to obtain additional debt financing, in either case on acceptable terms, continued acceptance of the Company's products in the marketplace, the effect of global economic conditions on the ability and willingness of customers to purchase its systems and the timing of such purchases, competitive factors, changes resulting from healthcare reform in the United States, including changes in government reimbursement procedures, dependence upon third-party vendors, timing of regulatory approvals, and other risks discussed in the Company's periodic and other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. By making these forward-looking statements, the Company undertakes no obligation to update these statements for revisions or changes after the date of this release. There can be no assurance that the Company will recognize revenue related to its purchase orders and other commitments in any particular period or at all because some of these purchase orders and other commitments are subject to contingencies that are outside of the Company's control. In addition, these orders and commitments may be revised, modified, delayed or canceled, either by their express terms, as a result of negotiations, or by overall project changes or delays.


Andrade J.,Montreal Heart Institute | Andrade J.,University of British Columbia | Khairy P.,Montreal Heart Institute | Dobrev D.,University of Duisburg - Essen | Nattel S.,Montreal Heart Institute
Circulation Research | Year: 2014

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia (estimated lifetime risk, 22%-26%). The aim of this article is to review the clinical epidemiological features of AF and to relate them to underlying mechanisms. Long-established risk factors for AF include aging, male sex, hypertension, valve disease, left ventricular dysfunction, obesity, and alcohol consumption. Emerging risk factors include prehypertension, increased pulse pressure, obstructive sleep apnea, high-level physical training, diastolic dysfunction, predisposing gene variants, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and congenital heart disease. Potential risk factors are coronary artery disease, kidney disease, systemic inflammation, pericardial fat, and tobacco use. AF has substantial population health consequences, including impaired quality of life, increased hospitalization rates, stroke occurrence, and increased medical costs. The pathophysiology of AF centers around 4 general types of disturbances that promote ectopic firing and reentrant mechanisms, and include the following: (1) ion channel dysfunction, (2) Ca-handling abnormalities, (3) structural remodeling, and (4) autonomic neural dysregulation. Aging, hypertension, valve disease, heart failure, myocardial infarction, obesity, smoking, diabetes mellitus, thyroid dysfunction, and endurance exercise training all cause structural remodeling. Heart failure and prior atrial infarction also cause Ca-handling abnormalities that lead to focal ectopic firing via delayed afterdepolarizations/triggered activity. Neural dysregulation is central to atrial arrhythmogenesis associated with endurance exercise training and occlusive coronary artery disease. Monogenic causes of AF typically promote the arrhythmia via ion channel dysfunction, but the mechanisms of the more common polygenic risk factors are still poorly understood and under intense investigation. Better recognition of the clinical epidemiology of AF, as well as an improved appreciation of the underlying mechanisms, is needed to develop improved methods for AF prevention and management. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Exelerence Holdings Inc., an investment company focused on the rapidly growing internet infrastructure industry is pleased to announce the appointment of Mr. Pierre Blouin to its Board of Directors. Exelerence owns and operates METRO OPTIC, a provider of high-speed fiber optic networks and I.C.E DATACENTERS, a carrier-neutral provider of network-centric datacenters in Canada. Mr. Blouin spent 30 years in the North American telecom and technology industry and recently retired as Chief Executive Officer of Manitoba Telecom Services Inc. and MTS Allstream. Previously, he occupied various senior executive positions within the BCE group of companies including President and Chief Executive Officer of Bell Mobility Inc., Chief Executive Officer of BCE Emergis Inc. and Group President, Consumer Markets for Bell Canada. Mr. Blouin is also an active corporate director and currently sits on the Board of Fortis Inc., the National Bank of Canada and the Montreal Heart Institute Foundation. “We are delighted and honoured that Mr. Blouin has accepted to join our Board of Directors,” said Michael Bucheit, CEO of Exelerence Holdings Inc. “His extensive leadership experience in the rapidly evolving telecommunications industry will provide us with valuable strategic guidance and assist us in accelerating our client-driven growth in high-speed networks and network-centric datacenters.” “I am pleased to join the board of such a dynamic company that owns solid and unique network assets and strong datacenter expertise. Its skilled and dedicated workforce is well positioned to meet customer demands in the fast-growing cloud market. I am looking forward to work with management and board members to support the company in rapid growth,” commented Pierre Blouin. About Metro Optic (http://www.metrooptic.com): METRO OPTIC is an independent provider of datacenter-neutral high-speed fiber network solutions. Since its inception, Metro Optic offers specialized telecommunications services and solutions to medium and large sized businesses, telecom carriers, cloud operators, wholesalers and datacenter operators. Its carrier-neutral datacenter at 875 Saint-Antoine is the fiber-densest interconnection center in Montreal. About I.C.E Datacenters (http://www.icedatacenters.com): I.C.E Datacenters (Interconnection and Colocation for the Enterprise) operates multiple datacenter sites and interconnection hubs in Canada. These include leading interconnection sites in downtown Montreal and in Markham (Toronto). I.C.E Datacenters combines deep datacenter expertise serving global enterprises and cloud operators in the U.S. and Canada with extensive know-how in operating high-speed fiber networks.


Exelerence Holdings Inc., an investment company focused on the rapidly growing internet infrastructure industry is pleased to announce the appointment of Mr. Pierre Blouin to its Board of Directors. Exelerence owns and operates METRO OPTIC, a provider of high-speed fiber optic networks and I.C.E DATACENTERS, a carrier-neutral provider of network-centric datacenters in Canada. Mr. Blouin spent 30 years in the North American telecom and technology industry and recently retired as Chief Executive Officer of Manitoba Telecom Services Inc. and MTS Allstream. Previously, he occupied various senior executive positions within the BCE group of companies including President and Chief Executive Officer of Bell Mobility Inc., Chief Executive Officer of BCE Emergis Inc. and Group President, Consumer Markets for Bell Canada. Mr. Blouin is also an active corporate director and currently sits on the Board of Fortis Inc., the National Bank of Canada and the Montreal Heart Institute Foundation. “We are delighted and honoured that Mr. Blouin has accepted to join our Board of Directors,” said Michael Bucheit, CEO of Exelerence Holdings Inc. “His extensive leadership experience in the rapidly evolving telecommunications industry will provide us with valuable strategic guidance and assist us in accelerating our client-driven growth in high-speed networks and network-centric datacenters.” “I am pleased to join the board of such a dynamic company that owns solid and unique network assets and strong datacenter expertise. Its skilled and dedicated workforce is well positioned to meet customer demands in the fast-growing cloud market. I am looking forward to work with management and board members to support the company in rapid growth,” commented Pierre Blouin. About Metro Optic (http://www.metrooptic.com): METRO OPTIC is an independent provider of datacenter-neutral high-speed fiber network solutions. Since its inception, Metro Optic offers specialized telecommunications services and solutions to medium and large sized businesses, telecom carriers, cloud operators, wholesalers and datacenter operators. Its carrier-neutral datacenter at 875 Saint-Antoine is the fiber-densest interconnection center in Montreal. About I.C.E Datacenters (http://www.icedatacenters.com): I.C.E DATACENTERS (Interconnection and Colocation for the Enterprise) operates multiple datacenter sites and interconnection hubs in Canada. These include leading interconnection sites in downtown Montreal and in Markham (Toronto). I.C.E Datacenters combines deep datacenter expertise serving global enterprises and cloud operators in the U.S. and Canada with extensive know-how in operating high-speed fiber networks.


Nattel S.,Montreal Heart Institute | Harada M.,Montreal Heart Institute | Harada M.,Hamamatsu Medical Center
Journal of the American College of Cardiology | Year: 2014

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia in clinical practice. AF and its complications are responsible for important population morbidity and mortality. Presently available therapeutic approaches have limited efficacy and nontrivial potential to cause adverse effects. Thus, new mechanistic knowledge is essential for therapeutic innovation. Atrial arrhythmogenic remodeling, defined as any change in atrial structure or function that promotes atrial arrhythmias, is central to AF. Remodeling can be due to underlying cardiac conditions, systemic processes and conditions such as aging, or AF itself. Recent work has underlined the importance of remodeling in AF, provided new insights into basic mechanisms, and identified new biomarker/imaging approaches to follow remodeling processes. The importance of intracellular Ca2+ handling abnormalities has been highlighted, both for the induction of triggered ectopic activity and for the activation of Ca2+-related cell signaling that mediates profibrillatory remodeling. The importance of microRNAs, which are a new class of small noncoding sequences that regulate gene expression, has emerged in both electrical and structural remodeling. Remodeling related to aging, cardiac disease, and AF itself is believed to underlie the progressive nature of the arrhythmia, which contributes to the complexities of long-term management. New tools that are being developed to quantify remodeling processes and monitor their progression include novel biomarkers, imaging modalities to quantify/localize fibrosis, and noninvasive monitoring/mapping to better characterize the burden of AF and identify arrhythmic sources. This report reviews recent advances in the understanding of the basic pathophysiology of atrial remodeling and potential therapeutic implications. © 2014 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation Published by Elsevier Inc.


The 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Guidelines provide detailed recommendations for AF management, as well as extensive background information. The Guidelines documents highlight many important unresolved questions and areas of clinical need that could benefit from basic research investigations. This article discusses basic research priorities emanating from the Guidelines reflections. Topics addressed include forms of AF and their interrelations, limitations of the presently available experimental models of AF, genetic factors, determinants of drug efficacy for pharmacologic cardioversion, mechanisms of AF-related thromboembolism, ventricular rate control, drugs for rhythm control, upstream therapy, mechanisms by which catheter ablation controls AF, mechanisms of postoperative AF, and the possibility of novel patient-based surgical procedures. A guidelines-to-bench approach to research may allow for the development of important, clinically relevant new knowledge with impacts on patient management and future AF guidelines. © 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society.


Calderone A.,Montreal Heart Institute
American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology | Year: 2012

Scar formation following an ischemic insult to the heart is referred to as reparative fibrosis and represents an essential physiological response to heal the damaged myocardium. The biological events of reparative fibrosis include inflammation, the deposition of collagen by my fibroblasts, sympathetic innervations, and angiogenesis. Several studies have further reported that scar formation was associated with the recruitment of neural crest-derived cardiac resident nestin + cells that display characteristics consistent with a neural progenitor/stem cell phenotype. During the reparative fibro tic response, these Nestin + cells participate in neural remodeling and represent a novel cellular substrate of angiogenesis. In addition, a subpopulation of Nestin + cells identified in the normal heart expressed cardiac progenitor transcriptional factors and may directly contribute to myocardial regeneration following ischemic damage. Nestin protein was also detected in endothelial cells of newly formed blood vessels in the scar and may represent a marker of revascularization. Lastly, Nestin was induced in a subpopulation of smooth muscle a-act in + scar-derived my fibroblasts, and the expression of the intermediate filament protein may provide a proliferative advantage. Collectively, these data demonstrate that diverse populations of Nestin + cells participate in cardiac wound healing. © 2012 the American Physiological Society.


Lemieux Perreault L.P.,Montreal Heart Institute
Molecular Psychiatry | Year: 2016

The onset of psychosis is the consequence of complex interactions between genetic vulnerability to psychosis and response to environmental and/or maturational changes. Epigenetics is hypothesized to mediate the interplay between genes and environment leading to the onset of psychosis. We believe we performed the first longitudinal prospective study of genomic DNA methylation during psychotic transition in help-seeking young individuals referred to a specialized outpatient unit for early detection of psychosis and enrolled in a 1-year follow-up. We used Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array after bisulfite conversion and analyzed longitudinal variations in methylation at 411 947 cytosine–phosphate–guanine (CpG) sites. Conversion to psychosis was associated with specific methylation changes. Changes in DNA methylation were significantly different between converters and non-converters in two regions: one located in 1q21.1 and a cluster of six CpG located in GSTM5 gene promoter. Methylation data were confirmed by pyrosequencing in the same population. The 100 top CpGs associated with conversion to psychosis were subjected to exploratory analyses regarding the related gene networks and their capacity to distinguish between converters and non-converters. Cluster analysis showed that the top CpG sites correctly distinguished between converters and non-converters. In this first study of methylation during conversion to psychosis, we found that alterations preferentially occurred in gene promoters and pathways relevant for psychosis, including oxidative stress regulation, axon guidance and inflammatory pathways. Although independent replications are warranted to reach definitive conclusions, these results already support that longitudinal variations in DNA methylation may reflect the biological mechanisms that precipitate some prodromal individuals into full-blown psychosis, under the influence of environmental factors and maturational processes at adolescence.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 26 April 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.53. © 2016 Macmillan Publishers Limited


Dobrev D.,TU Dresden | Nattel S.,Montreal Heart Institute
The Lancet | Year: 2010

Inadequacies in current therapies for atrial fibrillation have made new drug development crucial. Conventional antiarrhythmic drugs increase the risk of ventricular proarrhythmia. In drug development, the focus has been on favourable multichannel-blocking profiles, atrial-specific ion-channels, and novel non-channel targets (upstream therapy). Molecular modification of the highly effective multichannel blocker, amiodarone, to improve safety and tolerability has produced promising analogues such as dronedarone, although this drug seems less effective than does amiodarone. Vernakalant, an atrial-selective drug with reduced proarrhythmic risk, might be useful for cardioversion in atrial fibrillation. Ranolazine, another atrial-selective agent initially developed as an antianginal, has efficacy for atrial fibrillation and is being tested in prospective clinical trials. So-called upstream therapy with angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin-receptor inhibitors, statins, or omega-3 fatty acids and fish oil that target atrial remodelling could be effective, but need further clinical validation. We focus on the basic and clinical pharmacology of newly emerging antiarrhythmic drugs and non-traditional approaches such as upstream therapy for atrial fibrillation. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Asgar A.W.,Montreal Heart Institute | Mack M.J.,Heart Hospital Baylor Plano | Stone G.W.,Columbia University
Journal of the American College of Cardiology | Year: 2015

The development of secondary mitral regurgitation (MR) due to left ventricular dysfunction, also known as functional MR, is strongly associated with a poor prognosis in patients with heart failure. The mechanisms underlying secondary MR are multifactorial; accurate imaging assessment of secondary MR may be challenging and nuanced; and the appropriate roles of medical, surgical, and interventional therapies for management of secondary MR are controversial and evolving. In this review, the pathophysiology, evaluation, and prognosis of secondary MR in patients with heart failure are discussed, and we evaluate in detail the evidence for the various therapeutic approaches for secondary MR, including guideline-directed medication for left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac resynchronization therapy and revascularization when appropriate, and mitral valve surgery and transcatheter interventions. The role of a multidisciplinary heart team in determining the optimal management strategy for secondary MR is also discussed. © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation.

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