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Wadcock A.J.,NASA | Yamauchi G.K.,NASA | Solis E.,Monterey Technologies, Inc. | Pete A.E.,University of California at Santa Cruz
29th AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference 2011 | Year: 2011

Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements were acquired in the wake of a full-scale UH-60A rotor that was tested in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40-Ft by 80-Ft Wind Tunnel. Flow field velocities were measured in a stationary cross-flow plane located at approximately 90 deg rotor azimuth. The region of interest was 4-ft high by 13-ft wide and covered the outer half of the blade radius. All measurements were acquired in forward flight conditions. The laser and camera systems were synchronized with the rotor 1/rev so that measurements were acquired for different rotor blade azimuths. The main objective of this paper is to describe the design of the PIV system and the installation of the system components in the wind tunnel. Examples of measured velocity fields are presented. These measurements represent the first PIV measurements to be made in the U. S. on a full-scale rotor in forward flight.


Morris R.A.,NASA | Venable K.B.,University of Padua | Pegoraro M.,University of Padua | Lindsey J.,Monterey Technologies, Inc.
Proceedings of the National Conference on Artificial Intelligence | Year: 2012

NASA and the international community are investing in the development of a commercial transportation infrastructure that includes the increased use of rotorcraft, specifically helicopters and civil tilt rotors. However, there is significant concern over the impact of noise on the communities surrounding the transportation facilities. One way to address the rotorcraft noise problem is by exploiting powerful search techniques coming from artificial intelligence coupled with simulation and field tests to design low-noise flight profiles which can be tested in simulation or through field tests. This paper investigates the use of simulation based on predictive physical models to facilitate the search for low-noise trajectories using local search combined with a robust noise simulator. Copyright © 2012, Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence. All rights reserved.


Wang J.,Monterey Technologies, Inc. | Guo X.,Monterey Technologies, Inc. | Lui M.,Monterey Technologies, Inc. | Chu P.-J.,Monterey Technologies, Inc. | And 3 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

Small stem cells, such as spore-like cells, blastomere-like stem cells (BLSCs), and very-small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) have been described in recent studies, although their multipotency in human tissues has not yet been confirmed. Here, we report the discovery of adult multipotent stem cells derived from human bone marrow, which we call StemBios (SB) cells. These isolated SB cells are smaller than 6 ìm and are DAPI+ and Lgr5 + (Leucine-Rich Repeat Containing G Protein-Coupled Receptor 5). Because Lgr5 has been characterized as a stem cell marker in the intestine, we hypothesized that SB cells may have a similar function. In vivo cell tracking assays confirmed that SB cells give rise to three types of cells, and in vitro studies demonstrated that SB cells cultured in proprietary media are able to grow to 6-25 ìm in size. Once the SB cells have attached to the wells, they differentiate into different cell lineages upon exposure to specific differentiation media. We are the first to demonstrate that stem cells smaller than 6 ìm can differentiate both in vivo and in vitro. In the future, we hope that SB cells will be used therapeutically to cure degenerative diseases. © 2014 Wang et al.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.96K | Year: 2014

The project goal is developing a modern, useable, and intuitive user interface (UI) for the Navys Joint Mission Planning System (JMPS) weapons strike planning user community. Monterey Technologies, Inc. (MTI) will use human factors engineering (HFE) best practices and the Agile development process to conduct a front-end analysis of the JMPS strike weapons planning process following MTIs user-centered design (UCD) approach. Steps include conducting a JMPS weapons planning process task analysis, conducting a heuristic evaluation of the JMPS user interface, and documenting the strike planner workload/workflow processes. Following this UCD process, MTI will use the analysis results to develop low fidelity UI concepts using a wire frame model approach, followed by higher fidelity story boards, and conduct walkthroughs of these wire frame models with Navy JMPS strike planner Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) to refine the UIs to ensure they contain the required functionality, are intuitive and easy to manipulate, and that they produce the needed output while significantly reducing planning time. MTI HFEs will leverage modern UI concepts such as found in current smart phones and tablet technology to refine the new JMPS UI concept, and develop a software plan for prototype development in the Phase 2 project.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 79.99K | Year: 2014

Naval tactical engagement planning processes require a planning infrastructure that supports an efficient, collaborative planning environment to produce tactical plans that meet mission objectives within mission constraints. To accomplish that goal, MTI will apply a user-centered design process to develop an SOA planning infrastructure to provide planners with tools to access accurate and timely data and to establish high-quality plan and mission situational awareness which: Leverages existing JMPS utilities Eliminates redundant data entry Intuitive and consistent UI across handheld devices such as tablet computers and smart phones Enables simultaneous data enter and access data Enables immediate plan changes and dissemination


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.92K | Year: 2014

The Visual Planning, Execution and Review-Carrier Air Wing (ViPER-CVW) system has been designed to provide Air Wing strike planners an integrated, 4-D planning capability that will facilitate near-real-time planning, review proposed plan execution, quickly generate planning products, share plan information across individual units, and reduce errors and planning time due to manual data transcription. The primary goal of this Phase 2 SBIR project is to integrate ViPER-CVW into existing and proposed shipboard and expeditionary Navy networks, using the Hornet JMPS Mission Planning Environment (MPE) for lead integration. Fleet user input will be a prime driver of emergent VIPER-CVW functional requirements, as well as the more detailed design of expanded feature sets. Compatibility with other DoD mission planning technologies, such as Electronic Kneeboard (EKB), and shipboard network domains will be a consideration throughout the integration effort. ViPERs aviation planning toolset will also be expanded to support simultaneous plan editing, expand capabilities to support non-carrier based aviation planning assets, and ensure the portability of planning data produced in ViPER across dissimilar platform systems.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.77K | Year: 2010

Monterey Technologies, Inc. (MTI), a 25-year old human factors company, has expertise in the Navy/Joint Planning Process. The company has developed a working demonstrator of a unique, semi-automated mission planning tool for the Echelon IV - Echelon III levels (Carrier Strike Group/Task Force/Numbered Fleet) that allows staffs to collaboratively plan in an interactive map-based environment, & automate decision brief/tasking message generation for Echelon V. Additional SBIR funding (November 2009) allows prototype development with added functionality. Significant fleet Flag support for this tool is being conveyed to OPNAV N6. We want to associate the tool with a C2 Program of Record, establishing a FY 2012 funding source, thus allowing additional SBIR/ONR funding for continued development. The company is seeking business relationships with prime contractors for these C2 Programs of Record.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.97K | Year: 2010

The Fused Sensor Image Display System (FSIDS) is being designed to guide landing of CH-53 helicopters during brownout conditions. FSIDS employs multiple sensors concurrently to create a high resolution synthetic scene of the landing area and potential obstacles The general approach is to use, in an articulated fashion, multiple sensor inputs, e.g., FLIR, millimeter wave RADAR, LIDAR, to verify or change a synthetic vision system (SVS) terrain database of the landing area. A key innovative feature of our work will be the development of algorithms to detect when the sensor data begin to degrade due to suspended particulates. Input from each sensor will be automatically rejected once its output becomes invalid, using algorithms based on the real time evaluation of image content. Different sensors will have different rejection points so the maximum information about the landing area will be gained when the last sensor is no longer contributing to the data base. The last acquired high-quality imagery from the sensor, appropriately registered to the terrain, will persist and provide content past the point of no performance for the particular sensor. A second innovative feature will be the definition, detection and pictorial depiction of obstacles in a highly detailed fashion commensurate with the quality of the combined sensor data. The SVS will present ground truth imagery to the pilot during the final seconds of brownout landing when sensors are ineffective. Our approach to the display of terrain and obstacle information is to begin with realistic synthetic rendering of the landing area that may be augmented by adding or enhancing visual features of the scene and the inclusion of alphanumeric information, if necessary.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.89K | Year: 2010

To obtain valid and reliable data, Human Factors Engineering (HFE) evaluations are currently conducted by people with specialized training and experience in HF. HFE evaluations designed and conducted by engineers without the necessary HF expertise run the risk of producing useless or misleading results. Alternatively, the HFE is simply not conducted. To ameliorate these problems, MTI proposes to develop the Human Factors Evaluation Mentor (HFEM) to guide non-HF experts in the design and conduct of HFE. The HFEM will use an innovative combination of Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) and Rule-Based Systems (RBS) to develop prescriptive designs for a set of routine HF evaluation methods. This powerful combination has not been used previously in advisory systems. The cases and rules used to develop the evaluation prescription will be drawn from a team of highly experienced HFE professionals. A characteristic of CBR is that successful applications add to the case data base and thereby continuously improve the HFEM. In Phase I MTI will develop and demonstrate a limited number of evaluation methods. Phase 2 work will expand the scope of evaluation types included in the HFEM incorporating HFE methods that best meet NASA's needs.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.88K | Year: 2015

The Visual Planning, Execution and Review-Carrier Air Wing (ViPER-CVW) system has been designed to provide Air Wing strike planners an integrated, 4-D planning capability that will facilitate near-real-time planning, review proposed plan execution, quickly generate planning products, share plan information across individual units, and reduce errors and planning time due to manual data transcription. The primary goal of this Phase 2 SBIR project is to identify inefficient, confusing, and error-producing aspects of the current mission planning interface and implement improved HCI methods to correct them. A primary objective of this work will be to identify and implement workflows which guide the user through the system functions required to achieve desired planning tasks. A User-Centered Design approach will be used throughout development, seeking frequent feedback from system users on how the current features are or arent fulfilling their needs and modifying or adding features in subsequent development cycles in order to ensure ViPER remains a valuable tool for Navy multi-aircraft mission planning.

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