Montefiores Institute For Reproductive Medicine And Health

Hartsdale, NY, United States

Montefiores Institute For Reproductive Medicine And Health

Hartsdale, NY, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Goldsammler M.,Yeshiva University | Jindal S.K.,Yeshiva University | Jindal S.K.,Montefiores Institute For Reproductive Medicine And Health | Kallen A.,Yale University | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics | Year: 2015

Purpose: To determine if blood type in infertile women relates to the likelihood for live birth (LB) following IVF, and to the etiology for infertility. Methods: Retrospective study of patients undergoing IVF at two academic centers in the northeast US. Relationships between blood type (A, B, AB, O) and patient characteristics, IVF cycle parameters and LB were assessed utilizing multivariable logistic regression analyses. Results: In the studied population (n = 626), women with type O were significantly more likely to have baseline FSH > 10 IU/L after adjusting for age, BMI and race (OR 5.09, 95 % CI 1.4–18.7, p = 0.01). Conversely, women with blood type A were significantly more likely to have ovulatory infertility compared to those with blood type O after adjusting for age and BMI (OR 3.2, 95 % CI 1.7–6.2). Blood type B was associated with increased likelihood of live birth (OR 1.9, 95 % CI 1.10–3.41, p = 0.03) after adjusting for factors recognized to impact IVF outcome. Conclusion: Ovulatory infertility and baseline FSH > 10 IU/L were more prevalent in women with blood type A and O respectively. However, those of blood type B had significantly higher odds for LB compared to other blood types after adjusting for factors recognized to impact on IVF cycle outcome. While underlying mechanisms are unclear, for infertile women, patient’s blood type is seemingly relevant for IVF cycle outcome. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Moy V.,Yeshiva University | Jindal S.,Yeshiva University | Jindal S.,Montefiores Institute For Reproductive Medicine And Health | Lieman H.,Yeshiva University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics | Year: 2015

Objective: Previous studies regarding the effect of obesity on serum anti-müllerian hormone (AMH) levels have been conflicting. Our aim was to determine the effect of obesity on serum AMH levels among women from different racial backgrounds. Methods: The medical records of 350 women (159 Caucasian, 99 African-American, 58 Hispanic, 34 Asian with ages 16–46) evaluated for infertility at an academic-affiliated center and who had AMH levels measured as part of their evaluation were reviewed. Age, AMH, body mass index (BMI), self-reported race, etiology of infertility, smoking history, maximum serum early follicular follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels, antral follicle count (AFC), and history of ovarian surgery, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy were recorded. Results: Age correlated negatively with AMH and antral follicle count across all races (p < 0.05). After adjusting for age, polycystic ovary syndrome diagnosis, and smoking, elevated BMI had a negative correlation with AMH in Caucasian women (β = 0.17, p = 0.01) but not in African-American, Hispanic, or Asian women. Conclusion: Elevated BMI correlates negatively with AMH in Caucasian women but not in African-American, Hispanic, or Asian women. Additional studies are needed to elucidate further the effect of race on the interaction between obesity and ovarian reserve. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.

Loading Montefiores Institute For Reproductive Medicine And Health collaborators
Loading Montefiores Institute For Reproductive Medicine And Health collaborators