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Montefiore Medical Center

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Patent
University of Arkansas, The Kitasato Institute, Montefiore Medical Center and Kagawa University | Date: 2017-01-17

Methods of delivering therapeutic agents by administering compositions including a bacterial collagen-binding polypeptide segment linked to the therapeutic agent to subjects in need of treatment with the therapeutic agent are provided. In these methods, the therapeutic agent is not a PTH/PTHrP receptor agonist or antagonist, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or epidermal growth factor (EGF). The bacterial collagen-binding polypeptide segment delivers the agent to sites of partially untwisted or under-twisted collagen. Methods of treating collagenopathies using a composition including a collagen-binding polypeptide and a PTH/PTHrP receptor agonist are also provided. In addition, methods of treating hyperparathyroidism, and hair loss using compositions comprising a collagen binding polypeptide and a PTH/PTHrP receptor agonist are provided. Finally, methods of reducing hair regrowth by administering a composition including a collagen binding polypeptide and a PTH/PTHrP receptor antagonist are provided.


Patent
Varian Medical Systems and Montefiore Medical Center | Date: 2016-03-07

Disclosed are methods of obtaining an expanded population of mammalian ex vivo cells for treating a mammalian subject by (a) administering to a subject an effective amount of an agent that confers a growth disadvantage to at least a subset of endogenous cells at the site of engraftment; (b) administering to the subject an effective amount of a mitogenic stimulus for the ex vivo cells; and (c) administering the ex vivo cells to the subject, wherein the ex vivo cells engraft at the site and proliferate to a greater extent than the subset of endogenous cells, to repopulate at least a portion of the engraftment site with the ex vivo cells. The repopulated cells can be harvested or left at the engraftment site. Methods of treating brain injury in a subject by engrafting ex vivo cells at the site of injury are also described.


Francis D. Baudry, MD, Psychiatrist and Psychoanalyst with his own practice, and affiliated with Mount Sinai Medical Center, and on the faculty of the New York Psychoanalytic Institute where he is a Training and Supervising analyst has been named a 2017 Top Doctor in New York City, New York. Top Doctor Awards is dedicated to selecting and honoring those healthcare practitioners who have demonstrated clinical excellence while delivering the highest standards of patient care. He is also a member of the Soldier’s project, an organization dedicated to giving free mental health care to veterans and their families. Dr. Francis D. Baudry was born in France and speaks fluent French and treats patients in both French and English. He is a vastly experienced psychiatrist, having been in practice for more than six decades. His long and successful career in psychiatry began in 1955, when he graduated from the New York University School of Medicine. After an internship at the Albert Einstein-Montefiore Medical Center, Dr. Baudry returned to New York University to complete his residency. Dr. Baudry is board certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, and is renowned across New York and beyond as a specialist in psychiatry and in psychoanalysis. He has lectured widely in England, France, Italy and Israel. With his wealth of experience to call upon, Dr. Baudry diagnoses and treats a wide range of conditions, from anxiety and depressive disorder, to post traumatic stress disorder, psychosomatic conditions and  borderline personality disorders. He also has a special interest in issues of creativity and its inhibitions both in literature and in the visual arts. Dr. Baudry has written many papers on topics ranging from liaison psychiatry to the art of supervision, character issues, the analytic encounter, applied psychoanalysis ( visual arts , poetry, novels and theater). He is also quite knowledgeable in French psychoanalysis and has written on the contribution of Andre Green.He is always happy to help mentor and advise less experienced colleagues and his dedication and commitment makes Dr. Francis D. Baudry a very worthy winner of a 2017 Top Doctor Award. Top Doctor Awards specializes in recognizing and commemorating the achievements of today’s most influential and respected doctors in medicine. Our selection process considers education, research contributions, patient reviews, and other quality measures to identify top doctors.


Patent
University of Arkansas, The Kitasato Institute and Montefiore Medical Center | Date: 2016-12-21

Methods of delivering therapeutic agents by administering compositions including a bacterial collagen-binding polypeptide segment linked to the therapeutic agent to subjects in need of treatment with the therapeutic agent are provided. Methods of treating hyperparathyroidism, and hair loss using compositions comprising a collagen binding polypeptide and a PTH/PTHrP receptor agonist are provided. In addition, methods of reducing hair regrowth by administering a composition including a collagen binding polypeptide and a PTH/PTHrP receptor antagonist are provided.


SEATTLE, WA--(Marketwired - May 11, 2017) - Atossa Genetics, Inc. ( : ATOS) today announced First Quarter ended March 31, 2017 financial results and provided an update on recent company developments. Steve Quay, President and CEO, commented, "We are encouraged by our positive progress in advancing the endoxifen program with our ongoing Phase 1 endoxifen study and pleased that our fulvestrant microcatheter study is proceeding at Montefiore Medical Center. We look forward to completing our endoxifen Phase 1 study in the next quarter and commencing a Phase 2 study in the second half of 2017." We are in the research and development phase and do not generate revenue. Operating expenses: Total operating expenses were approximately $1.7 million for the three months ended March 31, 2017, consisting of general and administrative (G&A) expenses of approximately $1.1 million and R&D expenses of approximately $544,000. Operating expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2017 decreased approximately $641,000, or 27.5%, from approximately $2.3 million for the three months ended March 31, 2016, which consisted of G&A expenses of approximately $2.2 million, and R&D expenses of approximately $150,000. The Company recorded a net loss of $1.7 million, for the three months ended March 31, 2017, as compared to a net loss of $2.3 million for the three months ended March 31, 2016. Atossa Genetics, Inc., is a clinical-stage pharmaceutical company developing novel therapeutics and delivery methods to treat breast cancer and other breast conditions. For more information, please visit www.atossagenetics.com. Forward-looking statements in this press release, which Atossa undertakes no obligation to update, are subject to risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from the anticipated or estimated future results, including the risks and uncertainties associated with actions and inactions by the FDA, the outcome or timing of regulatory approvals needed by Atossa, lower than anticipated rate of patient enrollment, results of clinical studies, the safety and efficacy of Atossa's products and services, performance of clinical research organizations and investigators, obstacles resulting from proprietary rights held by others, such as patent rights, and other risks detailed from time to time in Atossa's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including without limitation its periodic reports on Form 10-K and 10-Q, each as amended and supplemented from time to time.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Southern California medical group Allied Anesthesia today announced the addition of eight board certified physicians in Orange and Fullerton, Calif. Several of the doctors are fellowship trained in pediatric anesthesia, or regional anesthesia and acute pain management. Dr. Edward Lee, lead physician recruiter for Allied Anesthesia, said, “The addition of these incredible physicians signifies another step in our constant effort to give our patients in Southern California access to the absolute best possible care. Today, Allied is more than 100 doctors strong. And each of these doctors, including our eight new anesthesiologists, has passed through one of the most rigorous vetting processes in America—a process designed to filter out all but the top one percent. We couldn’t be prouder to welcome these fine doctors to the Allied Anesthesia team.” Dr. Abisola Ayodeji earned her medical doctorate at Medical College of Virginia, completed her first residency at Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn and pediatric residency at Stephen and Alexandra Cohen Children's Medical Center, New Hyde Park, N.Y. Dr. Ayodeji was also a pediatric anesthesia fellow at Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, Calif. She is based in Orange, Calif., and practices at St. Joseph Hospital of Orange and CHOC Children’s Hospital. Dr. Andrew Chen graduated from Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, Glendale, and completed his residency at University of Arizona, Tucson. He was a fellow in regional anesthesia at The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Dr. Chen is based in Fullerton and practices at St. Jude Medical Center, St. Jude Plaza Surgery Center and the Knott Family Endoscopy Center, all in Fullerton. Dr. James Cheon earned a medical doctorate at the University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago, and completed his residency at the University of Chicago. He was a pediatric anesthesia fellow at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. Dr. Cheon practices at CHOC Children’s Hospital, St. Joseph Hospital and the Orthopaedic Institute for Children in Los Angeles. He is based in Orange. Dr. Hao Ho graduated from Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia. He completed a residency at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, and was a regional anesthesia and acute pain fellow at University of California, Irvine. Dr. Ho is based in Orange and practices at St. Joseph and St. Jude Medical Centers. Dr. Vincent Lin earned his medical doctorate at St. Louis University and completed his residency at University of California, Irvine. Dr. Lin practices St. Joseph Hospital and Newport Center Surgical, Newport Beach, Calif. He is based in Orange. Dr. Sherif Meckael earned his medical degree at Rutgers University New Jersey Medical School and completed his residency at Montefiore Medical Center Albert Einstein College of Medicine, the Bronx, N.Y. Dr. Meckael served two fellowship at Albert Einstein College of Medicine—the first in pediatric anesthesiology and the second in congenital pediatric cardiac anesthesiology. He is based in Irvine and practices at Children’s Hospital of Orange County and St. Joseph Medical Center. Dr. Rebekah Nam earned a medical doctorate from New York University School of Medicine and completed her residency there. Dr. Nam regularly practices at St Joseph Hospital of Orange. She is based in Orange. Dr. Christopher Nguyen earned his medical doctorate at the University of Michigan Medical School. He completed his first residency at University of California, San Diego, and an additional residency in pediatric anesthesiology at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Dr. Nguyen regularly practices at CHOC Children’s Hospital and St. Joseph Hospital of Orange, both in Orange. About Allied Anesthesia: With over 100 highly qualified physician anesthesiologists on staff, Allied Anesthesia provides adult and pediatric anesthesia services to St. Joseph Hospital of Orange, CHOC Children’s Hospital, St. Jude Medical Center in Fullerton, Calif., San Antonio Community Hospital in Upland, St. Mary’s Hospital in Apple Valley and many other Southern California health care facilities. In 2014, Allied Anesthesia joined with Fullerton Anesthesia Associates and Upland Anesthesia Medical Group to consolidate best practices in more than six hospitals and more than a dozen ambulatory surgery centers. The expanded medical practice is dedicated to offering the highest comprehensive quality of care and the most cost-effective procedures in all facilities they serve. All Allied physician anesthesiologists are board certified in anesthesiology and staff and manage the most efficient operating rooms in Southern California. Allied is a member of the California Society of Anesthesiologists, the American Society of Anesthesiologists, and the Anesthesia Quality Institute.


SEATTLE, WA--(Marketwired - May 9, 2017) - Atossa Genetics, Inc. ( : ATOS), a clinical-stage pharmaceutical company developing novel therapeutics and delivery methods for breast cancer and other breast conditions, today announced that the Institutional Review Board associated with Montefiore Medical Center (Biomedical Research Alliance of New York IRB) has approved the Fulvestrant Microcatheter Phase 2 study that was recently transferred to Montefiore. The Fulvestrant Microcatheter Phase 2 study includes women with ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) or invasive breast cancer slated for mastectomy or lumpectomy. This study will assess the safety, tolerability and distribution of fulvestrant when delivered directly into breast milk ducts of these patients compared to those who receive the same product intramuscularly. The secondary objective of the study is to determine if there are changes in the expression of Ki67 as well as estrogen and progesterone receptors between a pre-fulvestrant biopsy and post-fulvestrant surgical specimen. Digital breast imaging before and after drug administration in both groups will also be performed to determine the effect of fulvestrant on any lesions as well as breast density of the participant. Six study participants will receive the standard intramuscular fulvestrant dose of 500 mg to establish the reference drug distribution, and 24 participants will receive fulvestrant by intraductal instillation utilizing Atossa's microcatheter device. "This study was initiated at The Columbia University Medical Center Breast Cancer Program and then transferred to Montefiore Medical Center at the beginning of 2017 when the principal investigator moved his practice to Montefiore," commented Steven Quay, CEO and President. "We are pleased that the study continues to move forward at Montefiore, which is a leading center for breast cancer treatment." Atossa Genetics, Inc. is a clinical-stage pharmaceutical company developing novel therapeutics and delivery methods to treat breast cancer and other breast conditions. For more information, please visit www.atossagenetics.com. Forward-looking statements in this press release, which Atossa undertakes no obligation to update, are subject to risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from the anticipated or estimated future results, including the risks and uncertainties associated with actions and inactions by the FDA, the outcome or timing of regulatory approvals needed by Atossa, lower than anticipated rate of patient enrollment, results of clinical studies, the safety and efficacy of Atossa's products and services, performance of clinical research organizations and investigators, obstacles resulting from proprietary rights held by others with respect to fulvestrant, such as patent rights, and other risks detailed from time to time in Atossa's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including without limitation its periodic reports on Form 10-K and 10-Q, each as amended and supplemented from time to time.


CRANBURY, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Clostridium difficile infections cause serious symptoms that range from diarrhea to life-threatening inflammation of the colon. Approximately 30,000 Americans die within one month of the infection being diagnosed, and new evidence reveals that emerging, more virulent strains (that are also more difficult to treat) are leading to higher mortality rates. Hospitals and nursing homes are two settings in which Clostridium difficile infections notably transpire, mainly because of their high levels of bacteria exposure. However, the infection now is becoming more prevalent in communities, as well, and primary care physicians are increasingly concerned. The infection is especially harmful for patients who have medical conditions that have weakened their immune system, such as inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer, or who are undergoing serious treatments like chemotherapy. In an effort to raise awareness about the risks of Clostridium difficile infection and to instruct the public and health care professionals on ways to prevent or manage the condition, MD Magazine® recently connected key opinion leaders in the field during the expert panel discussion, “Managing Clostridium Difficile Infections In the Community.” As scrutinized throughout this Peer Exchange®, evidence demonstrates increasing rates of the infection in populations of patients that have no common risk factors. “What’s interesting about the community cases is that they’re occurring in a group of people that, heretofore, were not recognized to be at risk for this disease,” remarked Lawrence J. Brandt, MD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center. Throughout the 16-part series, available at http://www.mdmag.com/peer-exchange/clostridium-difficile-infections, Dr Brandt and colleagues consider Clostridium difficile infection risk factors and potential community sources and highlight top strategies in the diagnosis and management of the potentially chronic condition. They also provide insight on promoting antibiotic stewardship, including information on high-risk versus low-risk antibiotics. Among the educational points is an emphasis on the high rate of recurrence. “Unfortunately, many people are not informed that this could come back, and lots of those people (where it does come back) end up in the hospital just because diarrhea came back and they didn’t know to call someone,” noted Erik Dubberke, MD, Washington University School of Medicine. MD Magazine® is a comprehensive clinical news and information portal that provides physicians and other health care professionals with up-to-date specialty- and disease-specific resources designed to help them provide better care to patients. Readers have access to breaking news, video interviews with physician experts, in-depth conference coverage, finance and practice-management updates, and insight and analysis from physician contributors and other multimedia resources. MD Magazine® is part of Michael J. Hennessy Associates, Inc., a full-service health care communications company offering education, research and medical media. For more information, please visit: http://www.mdmag.com/


Klampfer L.,Montefiore Medical Center
Current Cancer Drug Targets | Year: 2011

Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, are at increased risk of developing colon cancer, confirming that chronic inflammation predisposes to development of tumors. Moreover, it appears that colon cancers that do not develop as a complication of inflammatory bowel disease are also driven by inflammation, because it has been shown that regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) lowers the mortality from sporadic colon cancer and results in regression of adenomas in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients, who inherit a mutation in the Apc gene. Colorectal cancer therefore represents a paradigm for the link between inflammation and cancer. Inflammation is driven by soluble factors, cytokines and chemokines, which can be produced by tumor cells themselves or, more often, by the cells recruited to the tumor microenvironment. Inflammatory cytokines and chemokines promote growth of tumor cells, perturb their differentiation, and support the survival of cancer cells. Tumor cells become addicted to inflammatory stroma, suggesting that the tumor microenvironment represents an attractive target for preventive and therapeutic strategies. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNFα, IL-6 and IL-1β, or transcription factors that are required for signaling by these cytokines, including NF-κB and STATs, are indeed emerging as potential targets for anticancer therapy. TNFα antagonists are in phase I/II clinical trials and have been shown to be well tolerated in patients with solid tumors, and IL-1β antagonists that ameliorate several inflammatory disorders characterized by excessive IL-1β production, will likely follow. Therefore, development of drugs that normalize the tumor microenvironment or interrupt the crosstalk between tumor and the tumor microenvironment is an important approach to the management of cancer. © 2011 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.


Patent
Montefiore Medical Center | Date: 2016-01-12

Systems and methods are described for a sternal osteotomy guide and sternal fixation system.

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