Molecular Oncology Diagnostics Unit

London, United Kingdom

Molecular Oncology Diagnostics Unit

London, United Kingdom
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Jovanovic J.V.,King's College London | Ivey A.,King's College London | Ivey A.,Molecular Oncology Diagnostics Unit | Vannucchi A.M.,University of Florence | And 37 more authors.
Leukemia | Year: 2013

Reliable detection of JAK2-V617F is critical for accurate diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs); in addition, sensitive mutation-specific assays can be applied to monitor disease response. However, there has been no consistent approach to JAK2-V617F detection, with assays varying markedly in performance, affecting clinical utility. Therefore, we established a network of 12 laboratories from seven countries to systematically evaluate nine different DNA-based quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays, including those in widespread clinical use. Seven quality control rounds involving over 21 500 qPCR reactions were undertaken using centrally distributed cell line dilutions and plasmid controls. The two best-performing assays were tested on normal blood samples (n=100) to evaluate assay specificity, followed by analysis of serial samples from 28 patients transplanted for JAK2-V617F-positive disease. The most sensitive assay, which performed consistently across a range of qPCR platforms, predicted outcome following transplant, with the mutant allele detected a median of 22 weeks (range 6-85 weeks) before relapse. Four of seven patients achieved molecular remission following donor lymphocyte infusion, indicative of a graft vs MPN effect. This study has established a robust, reliable assay for sensitive JAK2-V617F detection, suitable for assessing response in clinical trials, predicting outcome and guiding management of patients undergoing allogeneic transplant. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.


Akiki S.,Birmingham Womens NHS foundation Trust | Akiki S.,University of Birmingham | Dyer S.A.,Birmingham Womens NHS foundation Trust | Dyer S.A.,University of Birmingham | And 15 more authors.
Genes Chromosomes and Cancer | Year: 2013

The cytogenetically cryptic t(5;11)(q35;p15) leading to the NUP98-NSD1 fusion is a rare but recurrent gene rearrangement recently reported to identify a group of young AML patients with poor prognosis. We used reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to screen retrospectively diagnostic samples from 54 unselected pediatric AML patients and designed a real time quantitative PCR assay to track individual patient response to treatment. Four positive cases (7%) were identified; three arising de novo and one therapy related AML. All had intermediate risk cytogenetic markers and a concurrent FLT3-ITD but lacked NPM1 and CEBPA mutations. The patients had a poor response to therapy and all proceeded to hematopoietic stem cell transplant. These data lend support to the adoption of screening for NUP98-NSD1 in pediatric AML without otherwise favorable genetic markers. The role of quantitative PCR is also highlighted as a potential tool for managing NUP98-NSD1 positive patients post-treatment. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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