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Catalan-Dibene J.,Autonomous University of Baja California | Catalan-Dibene J.,CICESE | Catalan-Dibene J.,University of California at Irvine | Johnson S.M.,University of California at Davis | And 8 more authors.
Fungal Biology | Year: 2014

Coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever) represents a serious threat to inhabitants of endemic areas of North America. Despite successful clinical isolations of the fungal etiological agent, Coccidioides spp., the screening of environmental samples has had low effectiveness, mainly because of the poor characterization of Coccidioides ecological niche. We explored Valle de las Palmas, Baja California, Mexico, a highly endemic area near the U.S.-Mexico border, where we previously detected Coccidioides via culture-independent molecular methods. By testing the serum from 40-trapped rodents with ELISA, we detected antibodies against Coccidioides in two species: Peromyscus maniculatus and Neotoma lepida. This study comprises the first report of wild rodent serum tested for coccidioidal antibodies, and sets the basis to analyze this pathogen in its natural environment and explore its potential ecological niche. © 2014 The British Mycological Society.


PubMed | Laboratory of Molecular Epidemiology
Type: | Journal: EXCLI journal | Year: 2015

The deep-sea habitat is a source of very potent marine-derived agents that may inhibit the growth of human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Salinosporamide-A, Marizomib, by Salinispora species is a proteasome inhibitor with promising anticancer activity (Phase I/II trials). Different deep-sea-derived drugs are under preclinical evaluation. Cancer is a complex disease that may be represented by network medicine. A simple consequence is the change of the concept of target entity from a single protein to a whole molecular pathway and or cellular network. Deep-sea-derived drugs fit well to this new concept.


News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Edison T. Liu, M.D. of The Jackson Laboratory (JAX) has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Elected by his peers, Liu was recognized for his distinguished contributions to cancer biology, particularly the molecular analysis of breast cancer, and to the global advancement of human genomics. "I am honored to be elected as an AAAS Fellow, and to be included in this distinguished group of leaders dedicated to advancing science," said Liu. "This is a pivotal moment in medical science -- one where the global community can work together as never before in improving human health." Liu is the president and CEO of The Jackson Laboratory. Previously, he was the founding executive director of the Genome Institute of Singapore, and served as president of the Human Genome Organization (HUGO). Prior to that position, Liu was the scientific director of the National Cancer Institute's Division of Clinical Sciences, where he led the intramural clinical translational science programs. As a faculty member at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Liu was the director of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center's Specialized Program of Research Excellence in Breast Cancer; the director of the Laboratory of Molecular Epidemiology at UNC's School of Public Health; chief of Medical Genetics; and the chair of the Correlative Science Committee of the national cooperative clinical trials group, CALGB. Dr. Liu's scientific research focuses on the functional genomics of human cancers, particularly breast cancer, uncovering new oncogenes, and deciphering on a genomic scale the dynamics of gene regulation that modulate cancer biology. He obtained his B.S. in chemistry and psychology, as well as his M.D., at Stanford University, and served his internship and residency at Washington University's Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, followed by an oncology fellowship at Stanford. This year, 391 members were selected as Fellows because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. The Jackson Laboratory is an independent, nonprofit biomedical research institution based in Bar Harbor, Maine, with a National Cancer Institute-designated Cancer Center, a facility in Sacramento, Calif., and a genomic medicine institute in Farmington, Conn. It employs 1,800 staff, and its mission is to discover precise genomic solutions for disease and empower the global biomedical community in the shared quest to improve human health. For more information, please visit http://www. . About the American Association for the Advancement of Science The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is the world's largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science as well as Science Translational Medicine, Science Signaling, a digital, open-access journal, Science Advances, Science Immunology, and Science Robotics. AAAS was founded in 1848 and includes nearly 250 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals. Science has the largest paid circulation of any peer-reviewed general science journal in the world. The non-profit AAAS is open to all and fulfills its mission to "advance science and serve society" through initiatives in science policy, international programs, science education, public engagement, and more. For the latest research news, log onto EurekAlert! , the premier science-news Web site, a service of AAAS. See http://www. .


Russo P.,Laboratory of Molecular Epidemiology | Del Bufalo A.,Laboratory of Molecular Epidemiology | Fini M.,Scientific Direction IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana'
EXCLI Journal | Year: 2015

The deep-sea habitat is a source of very potent marine-derived agents that may inhibit the growth of human cancer cells “in vitro” and “in vivo”. Salinosporamide-A, Marizomib, by Salinispora species is a proteasome inhibitor with promising anticancer activity (Phase I/II trials). Different deep-sea-derived drugs are under preclinical evaluation. Cancer is a complex disease that may be represented by network medicine. A simple consequence is the change of the concept of target entity from a single protein to a whole molecular pathway and or cellular network. Deep-sea-derived drugs fit well to this new concept. © Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors. All rights reserved.

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