Oncology and Molecular Endocrinology Research Center

Québec, Canada

Oncology and Molecular Endocrinology Research Center

Québec, Canada
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Dimitrievska S.,Industrial Materials Institute of Canada | Petit A.,Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research | Doillon C.J.,Oncology and Molecular Endocrinology Research Center | Epure L.,Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research | And 3 more authors.
Macromolecular Bioscience | Year: 2011

Non-woven polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fibers produced via melt blowing and compounded into a 6 mm diameter 3D tubular scaffold were developed with artery matching mechanical properties. This work compares the effects of ethylene oxide (EtO) and low temperature plasma (LTP) sterilization on PET surface chemistry and biocompatibility. As seen through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, LTP sterilization led to an increase in overall oxygen content and the creation of new hydroxyl groups. EtO sterilization induced alkylation of the PET polymer. The in vitro cytotoxicity showed similar fibroblastic viability on LTP- and EtO-treated PET fibers. However, TNF-α release levels, indicative of macrophage activation, were significantly higher when macrophages were incubated on EtO-treated PET fibers. Subcutaneous mice implantation revealed an inflammatory response with foreign body reaction to PET grafts independent of the sterilization procedure.While their in vitro cytotoxicity shows similar fibroblastic viability, non-woven polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fibers sterilized using ethylene oxide (EtO) and low temperature plasma (LTP) show different macrophage activation in both direct and indirect macrophage (RAW 264.7) contact assays. A significant increase in TNF-α release (ELISA) following the EtO-sterilized fibers' incubation and no significant change following the LTP-treated fibers incubation is seen in comparison with negative (supplemented DMEM) and positive (solution of lipopolysaccharide, LPS) controls. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Gerard C.,Oncology and Molecular Endocrinology Research Center | Doillon C.J.,Oncology and Molecular Endocrinology Research Center | Doillon C.J.,Laval University
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A | Year: 2010

Among different strategies to provide blood supply to tissue-engineered devices and implants, the use of arteriovenous loops and bundles has been proposed. The aim of this study was to compare the vascularization and healing processes that took place in a one-end closed tubular collagen-based scaffold at different implantation sites in mice. These conditions were in the presence or absence of heparin and/or bone marrow cells. By 30 days, very few cell infiltrations were observed in the dorsal subcutaneous and peritoneal implants at any conditions; however, the presence of heparin and bone marrow cells improved cell infiltration toward an inflammatory reaction. The insertion of an arteriovenous bundle into the central cavity of the scaffold resulted in partial wound tissue infiltration in the control scaffolds implanted subcutaneously in the hind limb. In similar conditions, the presence of bone marrow cells and heparin resulted in dense wound tissue with numerous capillaries and a significant amount of newly deposited collagen fibers. The design of a central cavity in a porous scaffold with one closed end may facilitate invasion from the central part of the implant toward the implant wall. In addition, the presence of both a vascular component and stem/progenitor cells may lead to a vascularized implant while limiting the inflammatory reaction. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Doillon C.J.,Oncology and Molecular Endocrinology Research Center | Doillon C.J.,Laval University | Lehance F.,Advitech Inc. | Bordeleau L.-J.,Oncology and Molecular Endocrinology Research Center | And 2 more authors.
International Wound Journal | Year: 2011

A complex compound (immune ('IM') fraction) from colostrum-derived whey was investigated for its potential wound healing properties. One of its most intriguing in vitro abilities was to significantly inhibit the contraction of collagen gel while fibroblast density remained as in control gels. This antagonist effect was dose dependent and fibroblasts in these gels did not exhibit any stress fibres. Subsequently, in vivo studies have been conducted in two wound models in guinea pigs. Daily application on full-thickness wounds of a liquid formulation of the IM fraction (first model) significantly delayed wound closure by contraction compared to what normally occurred in control wounds. In another wound model, a gel formulation of the IM fraction was applied on scar tissues, which resulted in a minimised residual scar on 5/8 wounds compared to corresponding wound areas seen prior to treatment. Conversely, most control wounds exhibited scar tissue from which 3/8 resembled hypertrophic scar tissue. Wound tissue treated with IM fraction covered a significantly larger area than in the control wounds, whereas the collagen deposition was unchanged as in the presence of α-smooth muscle actin. Thus, IM fraction may act by modulating the contraction rate and wound remodelling. © 2011 The Authors. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.


PubMed | Oncology and Molecular Endocrinology Research Center
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: International wound journal | Year: 2011

A complex compound (immune (IM) fraction) from colostrum-derived whey was investigated for its potential wound healing properties. One of its most intriguing in vitro abilities was to significantly inhibit the contraction of collagen gel while fibroblast density remained as in control gels. This antagonist effect was dose dependent and fibroblasts in these gels did not exhibit any stress fibres. Subsequently, in vivo studies have been conducted in two wound models in guinea pigs. Daily application on full-thickness wounds of a liquid formulation of the IM fraction (first model) significantly delayed wound closure by contraction compared to what normally occurred in control wounds. In another wound model, a gel formulation of the IM fraction was applied on scar tissues, which resulted in a minimised residual scar on 5/8 wounds compared to corresponding wound areas seen prior to treatment. Conversely, most control wounds exhibited scar tissue from which 3/8 resembled hypertrophic scar tissue. Wound tissue treated with IM fraction covered a significantly larger area than in the control wounds, whereas the collagen deposition was unchanged as in the presence of -smooth muscle actin. Thus, IM fraction may act by modulating the contraction rate and wound remodelling.


PubMed | Oncology and Molecular Endocrinology Research Center
Type: Evaluation Studies | Journal: Journal of biomedical materials research. Part A | Year: 2010

Among different strategies to provide blood supply to tissue-engineered devices and implants, the use of arteriovenous loops and bundles has been proposed. The aim of this study was to compare the vascularization and healing processes that took place in a one-end closed tubular collagen-based scaffold at different implantation sites in mice. These conditions were in the presence or absence of heparin and/or bone marrow cells. By 30 days, very few cell infiltrations were observed in the dorsal subcutaneous and peritoneal implants at any conditions; however, the presence of heparin and bone marrow cells improved cell infiltration toward an inflammatory reaction. The insertion of an arteriovenous bundle into the central cavity of the scaffold resulted in partial wound tissue infiltration in the control scaffolds implanted subcutaneously in the hind limb. In similar conditions, the presence of bone marrow cells and heparin resulted in dense wound tissue with numerous capillaries and a significant amount of newly deposited collagen fibers. The design of a central cavity in a porous scaffold with one closed end may facilitate invasion from the central part of the implant toward the implant wall. In addition, the presence of both a vascular component and stem/progenitor cells may lead to a vascularized implant while limiting the inflammatory reaction.

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