Laboratory of Molecular Anthropology

Budapest, Hungary

Laboratory of Molecular Anthropology

Budapest, Hungary

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Guba Z.,Laboratory of Molecular Anthropology | Guba Z.,Laboratory of Molecular Taxonomy | Hadadi E.,Laboratory of Molecular Anthropology | Major A.,Laboratory of Molecular Taxonomy | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Human Genetics | Year: 2011

Analysis of mitochondrial mutations in the HVS-I region is an effective method for ancient human populational studies. Discontinuous haplotype data between the first farmers and contemporary Europeans has been described before. Our contribution is based on a survey initiated on the Neolithic skeletons from Hungarian archaeological sites in the Alföld. This Lowland, the Hungarian Plain, is well excavated as an important region for spread of Neolithic culture from Near East and Balkans toward Central and Western Europe, started circa 8000 years ago. HVS-I sequences from nt15977 to nt16430 of 11 such specimens with sufficient mitochondrial DNA preservation among an extended Neolithic collection were analysed for polymorphisms, identifying 23 different ones. After assigning all single-nucleotide polymorphisms, a novel, N9a, N1a, C5, D1/G1a, M/R24 haplogroups were determined. On mitochondrial control mutations at nt16257 and nt16261, polymorphic PCRs were carried out to assess their distribution in remains. Neolithic data set was compared with contemporary Vác samples and references, resulting in higher frequency of N9a in Alföld as a remarkable genetic discontinuity. Our investigation is the first to study mutations form Neolithic of Hungary, resulting in an outcome of Far Eastern haplogroups in the Carpathian Basin. It is worth further investigation as a non-descendant theory, instead of a continuous population history, supporting genetic gaps between ancient and recent human populations. © 2011 The Japan Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.


Sazzini M.,Laboratory of Molecular Anthropology | Sazzini M.,Center for Genome Biology | Garagnani P.,Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine | Garagnani P.,University of Bologna | And 19 more authors.
Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology | Year: 2015

Objective. Behçet's disease is a multifactorial vasculitis that shows its highest prevalence in geographical areas historically involved in the Silk Road, suggesting that it might have originated somewhere along these ancient trade routes. This study aims to provide a first clue towards genetic evidence for this hypothesis by testing it via an anthropological evolutionary genetics approach. Methods. Behçet's disease variation at ancestry informative mitochondrial DNA control region and haplogroup diagnostic sites was characterised in 185 disease subjects of Italian descent and set into the Eurasian mitochondrial landscape by comparison with nearly 9,000 sequences representative of diversity observable in Italy and along the main Silk Road routes. Results. Dissection of the actual genetic ancestry of disease individuals by means of population structure, spatial autocorrelation and haplogroup analyses revealed their closer relationships with some Middle Eastern and Central Asian groups settled along the Silk Road than with healthy Italians. Conclusion. These findings support the hypothesis that the Behçet's disease genetic risk has migrated to western Eurasia in parallel with ancestry components typical of Silk Road-related groups. This provided new insights that are useful to improve the understanding of disease origins and diffusion, as well as to inform future association studies aimed at properly accounting for the actual genetic ancestry of the examined Behçet's disease samples in order to minimise the detection of spurious associations and to improve the identification of genetic variants with actual clinical relevance. © Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology 2015.


Sazzini M.,Laboratory of Molecular Anthropology | Sazzini M.,Center for Genome Biology | De Fanti S.,Laboratory of Molecular Anthropology | De Fanti S.,Center for Genome Biology | And 18 more authors.
Genes and Nutrition | Year: 2016

Background: Non-celiac wheat sensitivity is an emerging wheat-related syndrome showing peak prevalence in Western populations. Recent studies hypothesize that new gliadin alleles introduced in the human diet by replacement of ancient wheat with modern varieties can prompt immune responses mediated by the CXCR3-chemokine axis potentially underlying such pathogenic inflammation. This cultural shift may also explain disease epidemiology, having turned European-specific adaptive alleles previously targeted by natural selection into disadvantageous ones. Methods: To explore this evolutionary scenario, we performed ultra-deep sequencing of genes pivotal in the CXCR3-inflammatory pathway on individuals diagnosed for non-celiac wheat sensitivity and we applied anthropological evolutionary genetics methods to sequence data from worldwide populations to investigate the genetic legacy of natural selection on these loci. Results: Our results indicate that balancing selection has maintained two divergent CXCL10/CXCL11 haplotypes in Europeans, one responsible for boosting inflammatory reactions and another for encoding moderate chemokine expression. Conclusions: This led to considerably higher occurrence of the former haplotype in Western people than in Africans and East Asians, suggesting that they might be more prone to side effects related to the consumption of modern wheat varieties. Accordingly, this study contributed to shed new light on some of the mechanisms potentially involved in the disease etiology and on the evolutionary bases of its present-day epidemiological patterns. Moreover, overrepresentation of disease homozygotes for the dis-adaptive haplotype plausibly accounts for their even more enhanced CXCR3-axis expression and for their further increase in disease risk, representing a promising finding to be validated by larger follow-up studies. © 2016 The Author(s).


PubMed | Laboratory of Molecular Anthropology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of human genetics | Year: 2011

Analysis of mitochondrial mutations in the HVS-I region is an effective method for ancient human populational studies. Discontinuous haplotype data between the first farmers and contemporary Europeans has been described before. Our contribution is based on a survey initiated on the Neolithic skeletons from Hungarian archaeological sites in the Alfld. This Lowland, the Hungarian Plain, is well excavated as an important region for spread of Neolithic culture from Near East and Balkans toward Central and Western Europe, started circa 8000 years ago. HVS-I sequences from nt15977 to nt16430 of 11 such specimens with sufficient mitochondrial DNA preservation among an extended Neolithic collection were analysed for polymorphisms, identifying 23 different ones. After assigning all single-nucleotide polymorphisms, a novel, N9a, N1a, C5, D1/G1a, M/R24 haplogroups were determined. On mitochondrial control mutations at nt16257 and nt16261, polymorphic PCRs were carried out to assess their distribution in remains. Neolithic data set was compared with contemporary Vc samples and references, resulting in higher frequency of N9a in Alfld as a remarkable genetic discontinuity. Our investigation is the first to study mutations form Neolithic of Hungary, resulting in an outcome of Far Eastern haplogroups in the Carpathian Basin. It is worth further investigation as a non-descendant theory, instead of a continuous population history, supporting genetic gaps between ancient and recent human populations.

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