Molecular and Integrative Physiological science Program and Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology

Boston, MA, United States

Molecular and Integrative Physiological science Program and Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology

Boston, MA, United States
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Konduru N.V.,Molecular and Integrative Physiological science Program and Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology | Murdaugh K.M.,Molecular and Integrative Physiological science Program and Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology | Swami A.,Molecular and Integrative Physiological science Program and Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology | Jimenez R.J.,Molecular and Integrative Physiological science Program and Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology | And 4 more authors.
Nanotoxicology | Year: 2015

Nanoparticle (NP) pharmacokinetics and biological effects are influenced by many factors, especially surface physicochemical properties. We assessed the effects of an amorphous silica coating on the fate of zinc after intravenous (IV) injection of neutron activated uncoated 65ZnO or silica-coated 65ZnO NPs in male Wistar Han rats. Groups of IV-injected rats were sequentially euthanized, and 18 tissues were collected and analyzed for 65Zn radioactivity. The protein coronas on each ZnO NP after incubation in rat plasma were analyzed by SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry of selected gel bands. Plasma clearance for both NPs was biphasic with rapid initial and slower terminal clearance rates. Half-lives of plasma clearance of silica-coated 65ZnO were shorter (initial – <1 min; terminal – 2.5 min) than uncoated 65ZnO (initial – 1.9 min; terminal – 38 min). Interestingly, the silica-coated 65ZnO group had higher 65Zn associated with red blood cells and higher initial uptake in the liver. The 65Zn concentrations in all the other tissues were significantly lower in the silica-coated than uncoated groups. We also found that the protein corona formed on silica-coated ZnO NPs had higher amounts of plasma proteins, particularly albumin, transferrin, A1 inhibitor 3, α-2-hs-glycoprotein, apoprotein E and α-1 antitrypsin. Surface modification with amorphous silica alters the protein corona, agglomerate size, and zeta potential of ZnO NPs, which in turn influences ZnO biokinetic behavior in the circulation. This emphasizes the critical role of the protein corona in the biokinetics, toxicology and nanomedical applications of NPs. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.


PubMed | Molecular and Integrative Physiological science Program and Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nanotoxicology | Year: 2016

Nanoparticle (NP) pharmacokinetics and biological effects are influenced by many factors, especially surface physicochemical properties. We assessed the effects of an amorphous silica coating on the fate of zinc after intravenous (IV) injection of neutron activated uncoated (65)ZnO or silica-coated (65)ZnO NPs in male Wistar Han rats. Groups of IV-injected rats were sequentially euthanized, and 18 tissues were collected and analyzed for (65)Zn radioactivity. The protein coronas on each ZnO NP after incubation in rat plasma were analyzed by SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry of selected gel bands. Plasma clearance for both NPs was biphasic with rapid initial and slower terminal clearance rates. Half-lives of plasma clearance of silica-coated (65)ZnO were shorter (initial - <1min; terminal - 2.5min) than uncoated (65)ZnO (initial - 1.9min; terminal - 38min). Interestingly, the silica-coated (65)ZnO group had higher (65)Zn associated with red blood cells and higher initial uptake in the liver. The (65)Zn concentrations in all the other tissues were significantly lower in the silica-coated than uncoated groups. We also found that the protein corona formed on silica-coated ZnO NPs had higher amounts of plasma proteins, particularly albumin, transferrin, A1 inhibitor 3, -2-hs-glycoprotein, apoprotein E and -1 antitrypsin. Surface modification with amorphous silica alters the protein corona, agglomerate size, and zeta potential of ZnO NPs, which in turn influences ZnO biokinetic behavior in the circulation. This emphasizes the critical role of the protein corona in the biokinetics, toxicology and nanomedical applications of NPs.

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