Falmouth, United Kingdom
Falmouth, United Kingdom

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Patent
Mojo Maritime Ltd | Date: 2015-06-30

A method of simulating the time taken to perform a weather restricted marine operation comprising creating a marine operation model, inputting one or more variables to the model, running the model in accordance with the one or more variables, the model determining the time taken for performing the operation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: LCE-03-2014 | Award Amount: 24.72M | Year: 2015

The most advanced wave power demonstrations today have showed the feasibility of power generation with single device deployments and MW-scale performance within several testing periods of several years. The next step beyond this is to deploy multiple wave energy converters in MW-scale with improved power generation capability and demonstrate that they are able to survive rough sea conditions over a period of several years. Clean Energy From Ocean Waves (CEFOW) project has an exceptionally good starting point. It has an existing site reservation in a wave power testing centre called Wave Hub, with all the needed infrastructure, including grid connection already in place. In addition, the wave energy converter technology to be deployed in the project has already been tested and proven in real conditions in Scotland. The ultimate purpose of the CEFOW is to increase the speed of wave power development, decrease the levelised cost of ocean energy by improving technical solutions used for multiple device system, and create an efficient supply chain to support larger wave power projects in the future. To reach these targets, the CEFOW consortium will improve the wave energy converter performance by 50% and raise its availability to 70%; develop new types of dynamic mooring and electrical connections suitable for multi-device deployment and deploy 3MW (three 1MW units) wave energy converters in real world offshore conditions in a grid-connected testing environment. In addition, CEFOW will study the feasibility of on-board and on-shore storage solutions and conduct thorough multi-year environmental, health and safety studies. The consortium spans the full value chain from research organisations to wave converter technology developers, marine service providers and a large multinational utility company as the operator.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 2.53M | Year: 2011

Offshore Wave Energy Limited’s (OWEL) wave energy converter is a floating horizontal duct, open at one end to capture oncoming waves. It is designed to be moored offshore in highly energetic, deep water locations. OWEL uses the horizontal motion of wave crests to repeatedly capture and compress air in order to drive a conventional, unidirectional air turbine. It has few moving parts and none in contact with the water. Its robust design, simple construction and minimal machinery will help keep the cost of power low and minimise maintenance. A single 350kW OWEL unit will be deployed at the Cornish Wave Hub facility in early 2013. This marine demonstrator will primarily be used to prove that the concept works at large scale in an ocean environment. This design will be a smaller version of a suite of commercial machines that will be developed for future deployment. The demonstrator will be developed by a national consortium of organisations that, between them, bring together the wealth of experience needed to successfully deliver a project of this nature: OWEL, IT Power, Ramboll, Narec, NPL, DNV, A&P Shipbuilders, Mojo Maritime, University of Plymouth and PRIMaRE. The overall goal of the project it to produce a costed and DNV accredited design for a 1st generation commercial product (rated at around 2MW per unit) by the end of 2013. From 2016 OWEL plans to sell this commercial product that will feature a number of ducts combined to form a single, 2-3MW platform. If you would like more information about the OWEL wave energy converter, please see: www.owel.co.uk.


Walker R.T.,University of Exeter | Walker R.T.,Mojo Maritime Ltd. | Van Nieuwkoop-Mccall J.,University of Exeter | Johanning L.,University of Exeter | Parkinson R.J.,University of Exeter
Ocean Engineering | Year: 2013

In order to fully utilise test sites, marine energy device developers must be able to deploy, maintain and decommission their equipment in a timely and cost effective manner. In addition, the marine energy industry is moving towards array deployments (DECC, 2012 and BBC, 2012) and whilst these deployments present an excellent opportunity to maximise resource usage whilst minimising the associated costs, for example of deployment, it is essential that said deployment is performed in a cost effective manner. Critical to this is the knowledge of the metocean conditions at the site and the weather window availability, particularly when this is coupled with vessel availability and downtime costs. In this paper a method is presented based on a Weibull model which uses cumulative distributions of the mean duration of persistence of exceedance (Stallard et al., 2010; Walker et al., 2011). The method discussed has been applied in a case study for the South West of England using site specific environmental parameters and empirical expressions to calculate the accessible periods. The outcomes from the case study are applied to identify the accessible periods and the waiting time for marine operations, and a discussion is made regarding the installation of wave energy devices at the south west Wave Hub (Wave Hub, 2010). © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Nicholls-Lee R.,Mojo Maritime Ltd. | Csehi J.,Mojo Maritime Ltd.
Proceedings of the International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering - OMAE | Year: 2013

With tidal stream energy moving ever closer towards full commercialization, there is a growing requirement for environmental monitoring and acquisition of meteorological data in sites of high flow velocity. Such data is imperative for installation of devices, design of arrays and for through life environmental monitoring of farms. Previously the typical method of obtaining accurate, live data has been to deploy a separate work vessel equipped with current monitoring equipment wasting fuel, time and money. Conventional buoys are not suitable for use on strong tidal current sites as the drag forces pull the buoy under water when the current speed increases. This work discusses the development of the Mojo Current Buoy, designed to provide tidal current profile and heading data for transmission back to land or ship in extreme tidal locations without submerging. It delivers a live data stream for the assistance of marine operations, and can also be used as a cost effective alternative to vessel or bottom mounted acoustic profilers for metocean data acquisition at tidal array sites. A case study of a recent operation based at the EMEC site, Orkneys, is used to illustrate the capabilities of the buoy. © 2013 by ASME.


Nicholls-Lee R.,Mojo Maritime Ltd. | Walker A.,Mojo Maritime Ltd. | Hindley S.,Mojo Maritime Ltd. | Argall R.,Mojo Maritime Ltd.
Proceedings of the International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering - OMAE | Year: 2013

Floating wave energy converters are surface based thus facilitating installation and maintenance. They tend to be moored offshore and consequently have less of an impact than other devices both visually and audibly. Mooring these devices is a challenging task, as not only are they subject to drift forces due to the aggressive environment, but they are also designed to operate at their resonant frequency in order to obtain as much power as possible. Such operational parameters require heavy duty mooring systems, capable of coping with the dynamic environment. These moorings will, in turn, affect the performance of the device by restraining the motions and thus modifying the energy absorption characteristics. In this paper a free floating representation of the Offshore Wave Energy Ltd. device (OWEL) has been modeled in RANS CFD in order to obtain initial mooring loads. Subsequently, a preliminary mooring arrangement for OWEL was developed, and using these loads it was modeled using OrcaFlex. The dynamic, nonlinear loads were then coupled to a fully transient, multiphase CFD analysis of the device in order to obtain performance characteristics for further detailed design. The numerical results have been compared to results obtained through physical model scale tests of the device and show a good degree of correlation. © 2013 by ASME.


Nicholls-Lee R.,Mojo Maritime Ltd. | Hindley S.,Mojo Maritime Ltd. | Parkinson R.,Mojo Maritime Ltd.
Proceedings of the International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering - OMAE | Year: 2013

In order for tidal stream technology to develop into a viable and cost effective energy solution, the overall cost of tidal array installation, operations and maintenance must be driven down. The key issues which drive the cost are the time required to conduct operations and susceptibility to weather risk coupled with the expense of marine assets. Current vessels have limited operational windows due to weather and tidal constraints, which result in considerable cumulative costs due to high charges for such vessels. The marine renewable industry is currently reliant on vessels of opportunity from the offshore oil and gas sector; which, while sufficient for single device demonstration deployments, are not viable for array installations. De-coupling the tidal sector from this market place offers the opportunity to reduce the volatility of vessel day rates. This paper presents the concept design of an efficient and economic, fit for purpose installation vessel for tidal stream energy converters. The vessel has good dynamic positioning capabilities for operation in strong tidal currents thus broadening the operational window. The environmental impact of the vessel is reduced when compared to existing vessels. A key criterion throughout the design process is minimizing the cost of the vessel to tidal turbine site developers. © 2013 by ASME.


Nicholls-Lee R.,Mojo Maritime Ltd.
Proceedings of the International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering - OMAE | Year: 2013

With offshore wind becoming a key source of renewable energy there exists a requirement for the acquisition of meteorological information at the sites allocated for development. Installation of a conventional, static, meteorological mast is costly. Multiple masts are required to obtain data at several positions in a large offshore wind farm, which further increases the cost of gathering such data. A structure that has mobility for relocation about the site has the potential to reduce costs whilst improving data capture coverage. As such, an instrumentation platform in the form of a floating structure which can be moved easily is desirable. This work discusses the development of a low-motion, lightweight, floating platform with tunable motion response as a basis for a repositionable meteorological measurement station. Wind speed and direction measurements are acquired at a range of heights in the atmosphere through the use of a pulsed Lidar (light detection and ranging) system. The motions of the platform have been analyzed both numerically and experimentally, and the performance of the platform in a range of seas is good. © 2013 by ASME.


Patent
Mojo Maritime Ltd | Date: 2013-08-29

An aquatic vessel comprising a control system for controlling the position of the vessel, the control system including one or more inputs for receiving real-time operational data in relation to flow conditions of the aquatic environment. The vessel has a dynamic positioning system and a navigational system connected to the dynamic positioning system, the navigational system comprising a data processing device and a plurality of motion sensors for continuously calculating the position, orientation and velocity of the vessel. Furthermore, a data processing device for generating data in relation to a plurality of possible failures of parts of the vessel is included, the data processing device being in communication with the control system which is thereby able to react in the event of an actual failure of a part of the vessel.


Patent
Mojo Maritime Ltd | Date: 2013-01-17

A vessel comprising a plurality of hulls, a propulsion system including propulsion devices at respective end regions of the plurality of hulls and a control system connected to the propulsion system to control operation of the propulsion devices so as to position the hulls, wherein the propulsion devices are angled relative to the vertical longitudinally of each hull. Such vessel can perform installation functions of sub-surface assets such as tidal turbines, wave energy devices, cable laying and the like, or to facilitate foundation installations and also the function of inspecting sub-surface areas.

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