Modern Olives

Australia

Modern Olives

Australia
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Ravetti L.,Modern Olives | Robb S.,Boundary Bend Estate
Advances in Horticultural Science | Year: 2010

The new Australian olive industry has been expanding at a steady pace during the past ten years and relies almost entirely in the total mechanisation of the grove management for its competitiveness. Modern straddle harvesters have been developed for olive picking during the past ten years but there is insufficient information about their performance. The performance of a large straddle harvester in comparison with a shaker has been evaluated. Furthermore, complete information about the operation of the straddle harvester throughout a harvesting season has been analysed. The parameters that have been evaluated are speed of operation, efficiency of fruit removal, canopy damage, trunk damage, net harvesting times and cost of operation. Large over-therow harvesters like Colossus and side-by-side shakers are competitive alternatives for harvesting full canopy size trees with both advantages and disadvantages. While shakers are viable options for small scale operations or a complementary tool for large operations in light cropping or late harvest situations, straddle harvesters are more competitive for large scale modern intensive groves with high levels of production. The high levels of efficiency obtained early in the season would allow straddle harvesters to carry out a timely harvest minimising the negative impact that a late harvest has on olive oil quality and on next season's production.


Guillaume C.,Modern Olives | Ravetti L.,Modern Olives
JAOCS, Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society | Year: 2014

The effect of storage conditions (light, temperature, container types) and time on the quality of natural olive oils from different cultivars and Australian regions were studied. The oils' changing quality was monitored through several physico-chemical methods (free fatty acids, peroxide value, UV-spectrometry (K232, K 270 and ΔK), induction time, total polyphenol content, bitterness, pyropheophytin a and 1,2-diacyl-glycerol content) and sensory analysis over 24 months. Pyropheophytins a and 1,2-diacyl-glycerols criteria showed very good performance as indicators of overall olive oil quality and freshness as well as highlighting any problems during the storage of the product. Pyropheophytin a increment averaged 7 % per year and the 1,2-diacyl-glycerols decreased at an average of 23 % per year at normal storage conditions over time. © 2014 AOCS.


Ravetti L.M.,Modern Olives
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2014

The modern olive industry has been expanding at a steady pace during the past twenty years and relies almost entirely on the total mechanisation of grove management for competitiveness. Consequently, achieving high levels of efficiency is necessary for the profitability of the industry. A broader approach to harvesting efficiency considers it as a ratio between an amount of valuable resource produced (P) and an amount of valuable resources consumed (C), where P considers the total amount of fruit harvested, the oil produced from this fruit, the quality of the oil and its impact on price as well as fruit losses due to natural fruit drop and impact on next year's crop and C considers all factors affecting harvesting costs such as type of harvester, harvester speed, length of harvest, fruit removal ratio and time losses amongst others. Mechanical harvesting with trunk shakers has been the most reliable method for reducing labour costs for the past 30 years. Nonetheless, during the past decade modern large-scale groves have discovered some of the limitations of using discontinuous systems. A new generation of continuous harvesting machines has been adapted or developed and used in many olive-growing regions. The performance of large straddle harvesters in comparison with shakers has been evaluated measuring speed of operation, efficiency of fruit removal, canopy damage, trunk damage, net harvest time and cost of operation. While shakers are viable options for small scale operations or a complementary tool for large operations in light cropping situations, straddle harvesters are more competitive for large scale intensive groves with high levels of production. The high levels of efficiency obtained early in the season allow straddle harvesters to carry out a timely harvest while minimising the negative impact that a late harvest has on olive oil quality and on next season's production. © 2014, International Society for Horticultural Science. All rights reserved.


Guillaume C.,Modern Olives | Ravetti L.,Modern Olives
Journal of Chemistry | Year: 2016

Extra virgin olive oil shelf-life could be defined as the length of time under normal storage conditions within which no off-flavours or defects are developed and quality parameters such as peroxide value and specific absorbance are retained within accepted limits for this commercial category. Prediction of shelf-life is a desirable goal in the food industry. Even when extra virgin olive oil shelf-life should be one of the most important quality markers for extra virgin olive oil, it is not recognised as a legal parameter in most regulations and standards around the world. The proposed empirical formula to be evaluated in the present study is based on common quality tests with known and predictable result changes over time and influenced by different aspects of extra virgin olive oil with a meaningful influence over its shelf-life. The basic quality tests considered in the formula are Rancimat® or induction time (IND); 1,2-diacylglycerols (DAGs); pyropheophytin a (PPP); and free fatty acids (FFA). This paper reports research into the actual shelf-life of commercially packaged extra virgin olive oils versus the predicted shelf-life of those oils determined by analysing the expected deterioration curves for the three basic quality tests detailed above. Based on the proposed model, shelf-life is predicted by choosing the lowest predicted shelf-life of any of those three tests. © 2016 Claudia Guillaume and Leandro Ravetti.

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