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News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

JETNET LLC, the leading provider of corporate aviation information, has opened registration for the year’s biggest ticket in business aviation: its upcoming annual JETNET iQ Global Business Aviation Summit in New York City on September 5-6, 2017. The list of speakers, moderators, and panelists reads like an aviation industry celebrity networking wish list. Registration before June 30 promises an early bird price of $795, a savings of $200 over the full-price registration. JETNET iQ has also posted the agenda, with a list of industry attendees, on their Summit website. The JETNET iQ Summit brings together leaders of business aviation’s manufacturers, suppliers, trade organizations, financial institutions, data analysts, as well as sales and marketing executives, to network and discuss the current state—and future direction—of the industry. This “Who’s Who” of aviation will be held this year at The Westin New York at Times Square, New York City, and is scheduled to coincide with the NBAA Regional Forum, to be held at Morristown Airport (MMU) in Morristown, NJ on September 7. “There are few opportunities in the year to not only hear this brain trust speak about the future of aviation, but to network with them directly,” said Paul Cardarelli, JETNET Vice President of Sales. “In addition, we’ll be sharing JETNET iQ’s research, the most accurate predictions about the future of our industry. We have a very limited number of seats for this event that sells out every year, so we encourage you to register now.” Early registration, as well as the full agenda, are available at JETNET iQ online, under the JETNET iQ Summit link. Since 1988, JETNET has delivered the most comprehensive and reliable business aircraft research to its exclusive clientele of aviation professionals worldwide. JETNET is the ultimate source for information and intelligence on the worldwide business, commercial, and helicopter aircraft fleet and marketplace, comprised of some 100,000 airframes. Headquartered in its state-of-the-art facility in Utica, NY, JETNET offers comprehensive user-friendly aircraft data via real-time internet access or regular updates.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Western Asset Managed Municipals Fund Inc. (NYSE:MMU) announces its portfolio composition as of March 31, 2017. Investment Objective: The Fund seeks to maximize current income exempt from federal income tax as is consistent with preservation of principal. Western Asset Managed Municipals Fund Inc., a non-diversified closed-end investment management company, is advised by Legg Mason Partners Fund Advisor, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Legg Mason, Inc., and is sub-advised by Western Asset Management Company, an affiliate of the advisor. An investment in the Fund involves risk, including loss of principal. Investment return and the value of shares will fluctuate. Fixed income securities are subject to credit risk, inflation risk, call risk, and interest rate risks. As interest rates rise, bond prices fall, reducing the value of the Fund's share price. Certain investors may be subject to the alternative minimum tax (AMT). State and local taxes may apply. Data and commentary provided in this press release are for informational purposes only. Legg Mason and its affiliates do not engage in selling shares of the Fund. For more information, please call Fund Investor Services at 1-888-777-0102, or consult the Fund’s web site at http://www.lmcef.com. Hard copies of the Fund’s complete audited financial statements are available free of charge upon request.


Synopsys, Inc. (Nasdaq: SNPS) today announced availability of the new DesignWare® ARC® HS4x and HS4xD processor family for high-performance embedded applications. The ARC HS44, HS46, HS48, HS45D and HS47D processors, available in single-, dual- and quad-core configurations, implement a dual-issue superscalar architecture that delivers up to 6000 DMIPS per core, making it the highest performance processor in the popular ARC HS family. The HS45D and HS47D also support more than 150 DSP-optimized instructions, delivering 2x higher performance and a unique combination of high-performance control and high-efficiency digital signal processing. To make it easier to take advantage of the new hardware features and simplify software development, the MetaWare Development Toolkit has been enhanced with dual-issue pipeline support, a rich DSP software library and an optimized C/C++ compiler. The ARC HS4x and HS4xD processors are designed to meet the power, performance and area requirements of a broad range of high-end embedded applications including solid-state drives (SSDs), wireless baseband, wireless control, home networking, automotive control and infotainment, multi-channel home audio, advanced human-machine interface (HMI), industrial control and home automation. "Our design team is under constant pressure to achieve higher performance for our SSD controllers to keep up with the rapidly evolving enterprise market," said Sky Shen, CEO at Starblaze. "Synopsys' new ARC HS4x and HS4xD processors will enable us to achieve new levels of performance while limiting power consumption and chip area, which is very important in our application. Additionally, the ARC development tools and ecosystem will help us accelerate our software development effort and project schedules." "A growing number of embedded applications require a combination of high-performance RISC execution and energy-efficient signal processing," said Linley Gwennap, principal analyst at The Linley Group. "Synopsys' new HS4xD processors, with their superscalar architecture and hardware DSP support, give SoC designers an alternative to implementing separate CPU and DSP cores, saving power and silicon gates." The ARC HS44, HS46 and HS48 processors utilize the ARCv2 instruction-set architecture (ISA), which enables the implementation of high-performance embedded designs with low power consumption and a small silicon footprint. The ARC HS4x family features a high-speed 10-stage, dual-issue pipeline that supports out-of-order execution, minimizing idle processor cycles and maximizing instruction throughput. The processors deliver up to 6000 DMIPS per core at 2.5 GHz while requiring only 0.06 mm2 of area and as little as 37 microwatts/MHz in typical 16-nm FinFET processes. The sophisticated branch prediction and a late-stage ALU reduce load-to-use latency to improve instruction processing efficiency. The HS4x processors are available in single-, dual- and quad-core configurations that deliver up to 24,000 DMIPS per cluster. The HS46 and HS48 offer instruction and data caches (up to 64 KBs of each) and support for full Level 1 (L1) cache coherency. The HS48 also incorporates up to eight megabytes of Level 2 (L2) cache as well as a full-featured memory management unit (MMU) supporting symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) Linux. Like all ARC processors, all HS4x processors are configurable and implement the ARC Processor EXtension (APEX) technology that enables the addition of custom instructions to meet the unique performance, power and area requirements of each target application. The HS45D and HS47D offer the same high-end control features of their HS4x counterparts with additional DSP capabilities useful for baseband, audio, voice, speech and other signal processing applications. To speed the execution of math functions, the HS45D and HS47D give designers the option to implement a hardware integer divider, instructions for 64-bit multiply, multiply-accumulate (MAC), vector addition and vector subtraction, and a configurable IEEE 754-compliant floating point unit (single- or double-precision or both). The ARC HS4xD processors are compatible with the ultra-low power ARC EMxD processors and have the same instruction set, making it easy to migrate code between the two processor families. The blend of high-performance RISC and DSP capabilities in the HS4xD processors provides efficient multi-channel audio processing for mobile, home and automotive infotainment applications. The HS4xD can simultaneously manage control tasks such as communications stacks and filesystem support while providing the signal processing bandwidth to support audio decoding, post-processing and voice-based HMI processing. These tasks are critical to high-performance wireless streaming speaker systems and voice-activated assistants found in an increasing number of homes. A portfolio of HS4xD-optimized audio/voice codecs and post-processing software is available from Synopsys and third-party partners. The ARC HS4x and HS4xD Processor family is supported by a robust ecosystem of software and hardware development tools, including the MetaWare compiler/debugger, the nSIM instruction set simulator, the MQX real-time operating system (RTOS), and third-party tools, operating systems (including Linux) and middleware from leading industry vendors. The MetaWare Development Toolkit includes an optimized library of DSP functions such as FFT and DCT, FIR and IIR filters, as well as vector and matrix math functions, allowing software engineers to rapidly implement algorithms from standard DSP building blocks. The Toolkit also includes an ITU-T base-ops library for developing voice codecs. For regular C code, the compiler automatically generates ARCv2DSP ISA instructions to deliver the best performance, including guided and auto vectorization optimizations. "We are seeing tremendous innovation and increasing complexity in embedded applications such as SSDs, wireless control and home networking, which is driving the need for significant performance increases in embedded processors," said John Koeter, vice president of marketing for IP at Synopsys. "The new ARC HS4x and HS4xD processors are the highest performance processors in the ARC portfolio, enabling designers to address the growing control and signal processing demands for their embedded designs." The ARC HS44, HS46, HS48, HS45D and HS47D processors are scheduled to be available in June 2017. Learn more about the DesignWare ARC HS4x/HS4xD Processors: Synopsys is a leading provider of high-quality, silicon-proven IP solutions for SoC designs. The broad DesignWare IP portfolio includes logic libraries, embedded memories, embedded test, analog IP, wired and wireless interface IP, security IP, embedded processors and subsystems. To accelerate prototyping, software development and integration of IP into SoCs, Synopsys' IP Accelerated initiative offers IP prototyping kits, IP software development kits and IP subsystems. Synopsys' extensive investment in IP quality, comprehensive technical support and robust IP development methodology enables designers to reduce integration risk and accelerate time-to-market. For more information on DesignWare IP, visit www.synopsys.com/designware. Synopsys, Inc. (Nasdaq: SNPS) is the Silicon to Software™ partner for innovative companies developing the electronic products and software applications we rely on every day. As the world's 15th largest software company, Synopsys has a long history of being a global leader in electronic design automation (EDA) and semiconductor IP and is also growing its leadership in software security and quality solutions. Whether you're a system-on-chip (SoC) designer creating advanced semiconductors, or a software developer writing applications that require the highest security and quality, Synopsys has the solutions needed to deliver innovative, high-quality, secure products. Learn more at www.synopsys.com. This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, including statements regarding the expected release and benefits of the ARC HS44, HS46, HS48, HS45D and HS47D processors. Any statements that are not statements of historical fact may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. These statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual results, time frames or achievements to differ materially from those expressed or implied in the forward-looking statements. Other risks and uncertainties that may apply are set forth in the "Risk Factors" section of Synopsys' most recently filed Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. Synopsys undertakes no obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements, or to update the reasons actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements, even if new information becomes available in the future. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/synopsys-new-superscalar-arc-hs-processors-boost-risc-and-dsp-performance-for-high-end-embedded-applications-300462064.html


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"Our analysis concludes that the results of the PJM Energy, Capacity and Regulation Markets in the first three months of 2017 were competitive," Bowring said. One of the benefits of competitive power markets is that changes in input prices and changes in the balance of supply and demand are reflected immediately in energy prices. PJM real-time energy market prices increased in the first three months of 2017 compared to the first three months of 2016. The load-weighted average real-time LMP was 13.0 percent higher in the first three months of 2017 than in the first three months of 2016, $30.28 per MWh versus $26.80 per MWh. Energy prices were higher primarily as a result of higher fuel prices. Energy prices in PJM in the first three months of 2017 were set, on average, by units operating at, or close to, their short run marginal costs, although this was not always the case during high demand hours. This is evidence of generally competitive behavior and resulted in a competitive energy market outcome. Net revenue is a key measure of overall market performance as well as a measure of the incentive to invest in new generation to serve PJM markets. Energy net revenues are significantly affected by energy prices and fuel prices. Energy prices and fuel prices were higher in the first three months of 2017 than in the first three months of 2016. For gas fired units, gas prices increased more than energy prices, resulting in lower energy market net revenues for a new combustion turbine (CT) and a new combined cycle (CC), the most commonly built type of new unit in PJM. In the first three months of 2017, average energy market net revenues decreased by 66 percent for a new CT and 29 percent for a new CC. For coal and nuclear plants, energy net revenues were higher because of higher energy prices. In the first three months of 2017, average energy market net revenues increased 17 percent for a new coal plant and 17 percent for a new nuclear plant. Total energy uplift charges decreased by $13.9 million or 35.2 percent, from $39.5 million in the first three months of 2016 to $25.6 million in the first three months of 2017. Total payments for demand response programs decreased by $109.6 million or 48.5 percent, from $224.6 million in the first three months of 2016 to $115.1 million in the first three months of 2017. The capacity market is the primary source of revenue to participants in PJM demand response programs. In the first three months of 2017, payments to demand response resources in the capacity market decreased by $109.5 million or 48.7 percent, while payments to demand resources in the economic program decreased by $0.3 million or 38.4 percent. Congestion costs decreased by $134.2 million or 45.9 percent, from $292.2 million in the first three months of 2016 to $157.9 million in the first three months of 2017. Congestion reflects the underlying characteristics of the power system, including the capability of transmission facilities, the fuel costs and geographic distribution of generation facilities and the geographic distribution of load. Congestion is neither good nor bad, but is a direct measure of the extent to which there are multiple marginal generating units dispatched to serve load as a result of transmission constraints and the costs of operating those units. ARR and FTR revenues offset only 86.5 percent of total congestion costs for load during the 15/16 planning period and 92.4 percent of total congestion costs for the first 10 months of the 16/17 planning period. The Independent Market Monitor (also known as the Market Monitoring Unit or MMU) evaluates the operation of PJM's wholesale markets to identify ineffective market rules and tariff provisions, proposes improvements to market rules and tariff provisions when needed, monitors compliance with and implementation of the market rules, identifies potential anticompetitive behavior by market participants and provides comprehensive market analysis critical for informed policy and decision making. Joseph Bowring, the Market Monitor, ensures the independence and objectivity of the monitoring program. For a copy of the State of the Market Report, visit Monitoring Analytics at: http://www.monitoringanalytics.com/reports/PJM_State_of_the_Market/2017.shtml To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/market-monitor-finds-pjm-wholesale-electricity-markets-competitive-300456210.html


News Article | December 2, 2016
Site: www.acnnewswire.com

Researchers from Korea's Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) have developed a high performance processor for autonomous vehicles called Aldebaran. Increased focus by the automotive and IT industries on enhancing autonomous vehicle technology has increased the market for dedicated core processors customized for autonomous vehicles. Aldebaran is a high performance processor designed using all-Korean technology for autonomous vehicles. It consists of four superscalar processors and an object recognition vision engine integrated to meet all functional safety requirements as specified by ISO 26262. Electronics components are indispensable to new cars as they play vital roles in critical functions. The proliferation of electronic components integrated into cars have spotlighted reliability issues regarding electrical circuits, as malfunctions can directly affect the safety of passengers. Moreover, several factors natural to typical vehicle operating conditions - including temperature, radiation, etc. - can potentially cause malfunction in electronic devices posing great risk. Processor IC chips are central computing components that can collect information from peripheral input components (e.g. radar, lidar, ultrasound, etc.) and process the information to control the system. Needless to say, the processor is an integral component of the autonomous vehicle and its malfunction could result in catastrophic results to passengers. ISO26262 is an international standard concerning the functional safety of electrical/electronic systems in production automobiles that was developed by the International Organization of Standardization (ISO). ISO26262 defines functional safety for electronic parts including electronic system hardware, software and production. Furthermore, the second edition of the standard includes material regarding the development and production phase of semi-conductor devices. ETRI's Aldebaran is Korea's first 1GHz processor targeting automotive applications compliant to the functional safety requirements of ISO26262 Part 11 and Part 5. The Aldebaran processor monitors the activities of multiple cores in real time to provide fault tolerance. Four cores are capable of operating independently at 1 GHz to provide high computational capacity. The Aldebaran processor includes a proprietary superscalar architecture, 32KB / 32KB cache memory, and a memory management unit (MMU) for virtual memory operation, with an emphasis on implementing an ultra-low power processor core. Aldebaran's I/O interface comes highly equipped for automotive applications with CAN (Controller Area Network) and CAN-FD (Flexible Data rate), serial communication via UART, and I2C. Furthermore, Aldebaran includes vision accelerators for vehicle and pedestrian detection. While similar autonomous vehicle processors in the market today consume hundreds of watts of power, Aldebaran is an ultra-low-power processor that consumes 100 times less power. One core in the Aldebaran processor consumes 0.24 watts at 1GHz and less than 1.0 watt when all four are operational. As the number of automotive electronic components increase, high power consumption is a decisive factor for decreasing the reliability of automobiles, and the importance of Aldebaran's low power processor is expected to gain more attention. We have verified the functionality of the chip with general operating systems such as Linux and RTOS, and created a developer friendly software development kit (SDK) that includes a C / C ++ compiler. The Aldebaran processor was manufactured 28nm CMOS process technology, and exhibited a 1.0 GHz operating frequency and 4.0 GOPS performance in actual operation verification while demonstrating the highest power efficiency in the industry at 0.24 mW/MHz. In collaboration with autonomous vehicle manufacturers, the Aldebaran processor was installed on an actual vehicle for steering control via image recognition, lane detection, lane recognition result analysis, and CAN. The Lane Keeping Assistance System (LKAS) demonstrated successful compliance to ASIL D level functional safety as defined in ISO 26262 Part 11 and Part 5. This development was facilitated by the Korean Ministry of Industry and Commerce, and ETRI has expanded its application area by successfully completing technology transfers of the Aldebaran processor and software development environment. In the upcoming era of autonomous navigation, companies with high performance processors and software with light-weight, functional safety technology will play pivotal roles in the field. While many enterprises spend billions of dollars every year to import processor core technology, the Aldebaran processor, which was developed using entirely domestic technology, will undoubtedly play a pivotal role in the development of the intelligent semiconductor industry. About ETRI Established in 1976, ETRI is a non-profit Korean government-funded research organization that has been at the forefront of technological excellence for about 40 years. In the 1980s, ETRI developed TDX (Time Division Exchange) and 4M DRAM. In the 1990s, ETRI commercialized CDMA (Code Division Multiple Access) for the first time in the world. In the 2000s, ETRI developed Terrestrial DMB, WiBro, and 4G LTE Advanced, which became the foundation of mobile communications. Recently, as a global ICT leader, ETRI has been advancing communication and convergence by developing SAN (Ship Area Network) technology, Genie Talk (world class portable automatic interpretation; Korean-English/Japanese/Chinese), and automated valet parking technology. As of 2016, ETRI has about 2,000 employees of whom about 1,800 are researchers. For more informatoin, please visit https://www.etri.re.kr/eng/main/main.etri For more information, please contact Dr. Youngsu Kwon Group Leader, Processor Research Group, ETRI e-mail: phone : +82 42 860 5244 Press release distributed by ResearchSEA on behalf of ETRI.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Pluto could be set to regain its planetary status after 11 years in exile, if NASA scientists have their way. A new definition of planets would add over 100 to our solar system, with even Earth’s moon due a promotion. The International Astronomical Union (IAU) currently requires an object to be orbiting the Sun to be classified as a planet. But the NASA team wants the IAU to drop that requirement, insisting that a world’s physical properties are more important than their interactions with stars. “In keeping with both sound scientific classification and peoples’ intuition, we propose a geophysically-based definition of ‘planet’ that importantly emphasises a body’s intrinsic physical properties over its extrinsic orbital properties,” the researchers explain. The proposal was made by a team of NASA scientists led by Alan Stern, principal investigator of the space agency’s New Horizons mission to Pluto. The decision was made after astronomer Mike Brown from the California Institute of Technology proposed a new definition of planets which required such worlds to clear the neighbourhood around their orbit. Stern compared asking the advice of an astronomer over a planetary scientist was like going to a podiatrist for brain surgery. “Even though they’re both doctors, they have different expertise,” Stern said. “You really should listen to planetary scientists that know something about this subject. When we look at an object like Pluto, we don’t know what else to call it.” Under the new definition, our moon, and other moons such as Titan, Enceladus, Europa and Ganymede would all be promoted to planetary status. The proposal is at least partly motivated by the public’s perception of the importance of non-planetary worlds within our solar system. The researchers write: “A common question we receive is, ‘Why did you send New Horizons to Pluto if it’s not a planet anymore?’” There’s no guarantee the IAU will accept the new definition, and even if they do, it’s set to be some time before it becomes official. Edward H. White II, pilot of the Gemini 4 spacecraft, floats in the zero gravity of space with an earth limb backdrop circa November 1965. Kinescope images of astronaut Commander Neil Armstrong in the Apollo 11 space shuttle during the space mission to land on the moon for the first time in history on July 20, 1969 The ascent stage of Orion, the Apollo 16 Lunar Module, lifts of from its descent stage to rendezvous with the Apollo 16 Command and Service Module, Casper, with astronaut Thomas Mattingly aboard in lunar orbit on 23rd April 1972. Five NASA astronauts aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis look out overhead windows on the aft flight deck toward their counterparts aboard the Mir Space Station in March of 1996. Photograph of the Milky Way Galaxy captured by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Dated 2007. The exhaust plume from space shuttle Atlantis is seen through the window of a Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) as it launches from launch pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center July 8, 2011 in Cape Canaveral, Florida. A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket carrying NASA's first Orion deep space exploration craft sits on its launch pad as it is prepared for a 7:05 AM launch on December 4, 2014 in Cape Canaveral, Florida. A military pilot sits in the cockpit of an X-15 experimental rocket aircraft, wearing an astronaut's spacesuit circa 1959. Echo 1, a spherical balloon with a metalized skin, was launched by NASA on 12th August 1960. Once in orbit the balloon was inflated until it reached its intended diameter of 30 metres and it was then used as a reflector to bounce radio signals across the oceans. Four views of Earth rising above the lunar horizon, photographed by the crew of the Apollo 10 Lunar Module, while in lunar orbit, May 1969. American geologist and Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison Hagan Schmitt stands next to the US flag on the surface of the moon, during a period of EVA (Extra-Vehicular Activity) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site, December 1972. The space shuttle 'Enterprise' (NASA Orbiter Vehicle 101) makes its way along Rideout Road (Alabama State Route 255) to the Marshall Space Flight Center near Huntsville, Alabama, 15th March 1978. A crowd of people, viewed from behind, watch the launch of the first NASA Space Shuttle mission (STS-1), with Columbia (OV-102) soaring up into the sky, leaving a trail of exhaust smoke, in the distance from the launchpad at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA, 12 April 1981. Astronaut Bruce McCandless II photographed at his maximum distance (320 ft) from the Space Shuttle Challenger during the first untethered EVA, made possible by his nitrogen jet propelled backpack (Manned Manuevering Unit or MMU) in 1984. Aerial shot of the launch of Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-41-D) as it takes off, leaving a trail of exhaust smoke, from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA, 30 August 1984. An astronaut's bootprint leaves a mark on the lunar surface July 20, 1969 on the moon. The 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon mission is celebrated July 20, 1999. Astronaut Charles Moss Duke, Jr. leaves a photograph of his family on the surface of the moon during the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, 23rd April 1972.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Discovered 30 years ago, Supernova 1987A is one of the brightest exploding stars of the last four centuries. To commemorate its anniversary, NASA has now released a tranche of new data about the spectacular star, including striking imagery and time-lapse video. The supernova is the closest star explosion seen in centuries, presenting an unique opportunity for astronomers to study the progress of the star’s death. The images, animations and time-lapse video have been created from data from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra X-ray Observatory and ALMA. All three instruments have been collecting data about the star’s explosion since it was first discovered in 1987. “The 30 years’ worth of observations of SN 1987A are important because they provide insight into the last stages of stellar evolution,” said Robert Kirshner of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation in Palo Alto, California. NASA ESA R Kirshner Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and M Mutchler and R Avila STScI SN 1987A can be seen at the centre of this image, resembling a white eye with a bright white pupil. The image can be viewed in full here. The data suggests the supernova has passed a critical threshold: the shockwave is now beyond the ring of gas produced late in the life of the pre-supernova. It’s knot known what lies beyond the ring. “The details of this transition will give astronomers a better understanding of the life of the doomed star, and how it ended,” said Kari Frank of Penn State University who led the latest Chandra study of SN 1987A. Supernovas occur when a change in a star’s core causes it to explode. They are the brightest explosions in space. Edward H. White II, pilot of the Gemini 4 spacecraft, floats in the zero gravity of space with an earth limb backdrop circa November 1965. Kinescope images of astronaut Commander Neil Armstrong in the Apollo 11 space shuttle during the space mission to land on the moon for the first time in history on July 20, 1969 The ascent stage of Orion, the Apollo 16 Lunar Module, lifts of from its descent stage to rendezvous with the Apollo 16 Command and Service Module, Casper, with astronaut Thomas Mattingly aboard in lunar orbit on 23rd April 1972. Five NASA astronauts aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis look out overhead windows on the aft flight deck toward their counterparts aboard the Mir Space Station in March of 1996. Photograph of the Milky Way Galaxy captured by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Dated 2007. The exhaust plume from space shuttle Atlantis is seen through the window of a Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) as it launches from launch pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center July 8, 2011 in Cape Canaveral, Florida. A United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket carrying NASA's first Orion deep space exploration craft sits on its launch pad as it is prepared for a 7:05 AM launch on December 4, 2014 in Cape Canaveral, Florida. A military pilot sits in the cockpit of an X-15 experimental rocket aircraft, wearing an astronaut's spacesuit circa 1959. Echo 1, a spherical balloon with a metalized skin, was launched by NASA on 12th August 1960. Once in orbit the balloon was inflated until it reached its intended diameter of 30 metres and it was then used as a reflector to bounce radio signals across the oceans. Four views of Earth rising above the lunar horizon, photographed by the crew of the Apollo 10 Lunar Module, while in lunar orbit, May 1969. American geologist and Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison Hagan Schmitt stands next to the US flag on the surface of the moon, during a period of EVA (Extra-Vehicular Activity) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site, December 1972. The space shuttle 'Enterprise' (NASA Orbiter Vehicle 101) makes its way along Rideout Road (Alabama State Route 255) to the Marshall Space Flight Center near Huntsville, Alabama, 15th March 1978. A crowd of people, viewed from behind, watch the launch of the first NASA Space Shuttle mission (STS-1), with Columbia (OV-102) soaring up into the sky, leaving a trail of exhaust smoke, in the distance from the launchpad at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA, 12 April 1981. Astronaut Bruce McCandless II photographed at his maximum distance (320 ft) from the Space Shuttle Challenger during the first untethered EVA, made possible by his nitrogen jet propelled backpack (Manned Manuevering Unit or MMU) in 1984. Aerial shot of the launch of Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-41-D) as it takes off, leaving a trail of exhaust smoke, from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA, 30 August 1984. An astronaut's bootprint leaves a mark on the lunar surface July 20, 1969 on the moon. The 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon mission is celebrated July 20, 1999. Astronaut Charles Moss Duke, Jr. leaves a photograph of his family on the surface of the moon during the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, 23rd April 1972.


Developers of Safety Critical applications upon the Zynq®-7000 from Xilinx now have the option of using SAFERTOS® at the heart of their design. SAFERTOS, the safety certified Real Time Operating System (RTOS) from WITTENSTEIN high integrity systems, provides a reliable and robust RTOS for developers of Safety Critical applications and is available pre certified to IEC 61508 and ISO 26262. SAFERTOS is a pre-emptive safety critical RTOS that delivers unprecedented levels of determinism and robustness to embedded systems, while using minimum resources. It’s used internationally across a range of safety critical applications and is renowned for its high quality. The Zynq-7000 is a powerful and flexible embedded solution with multiple levels of hardware and software security, architected to deliver lowest system power. It infuses customizable intelligence into today’s embedded systems to suit application requirements. SAFERTOS is available tightly integrated with the processor, including its MMU, allowing applications to be partitioned into logical segments according to their Safety Integrity Level. Commercial grade middleware can for example be used in conjunction with safety critical code, with isolation being achieved via the MMU. A demo of SAFERTOS for the Zynq-7000 is available and freely downloadable from the WITTENSTEIN high integrity systems website, at https://www.highintegritysystems.com/safertos “We find an increase in demand for SAFERTOS on the Zynq-7000” Says Andrew Longhurst, Business Manager at WITTENSTEIN high integrity systems. “We are glad to work closely with Xilinx, and can see that SAFERTOS on the Zynq-7000 is an ideal high performance, safe solution.” WITTENSTEIN high integrity systems is Member level in the Xilinx Alliance Program - a worldwide ecosystem of qualified companies collaborating with Xilinx to further the development of All Programmable technologies. WITTENSTEIN high integrity systems is a safety systems company that produces and supplies real time operating systems and platform solutions to the Medical, Aerospace, Automotive and Industrial sectors. For more information, please visit https://www.highintegritysystems.com.


News Article | August 15, 2016
Site: boingboing.net

Researchers from the University of Michigan EE/Computer Science Department (previously) presented their work on hacking traffic signals at this year's Usenix Security Symposium (previously), and guess what? It's shockingly easy to pwn the traffic control system. The researchers targeted the wireless control systems at each intersection, avoiding any tampering with the actual junction boxes, which might be detected by passers-by (though seriously, some high-viz vests and a couple of traffic cones would likely serve as perfect camouflage), and worked with the permission of a local Michigan traffic authority. Some of the systems they probed operated in the "open" spectrum at 900MHz and 5.8MHz, and some on a designated safety band at 4.9GHz. These radio channels were used to network the traffic signals together. The networking protocol is proprietary and unencrypted, and uses non-modifiable default passwords that are published online by the systems' vendors. By default these systems have the debugging port turned on, which allows untrusted parties to seize control over the system. Controlling a traffic signal also yields control over its sensors, including traffic cameras. Once inside a traffic light, attackers can alter the light timing, making the lights very short or very long, or permanently freezing them in one state. However, the lights do have a hardware-based governor that disallows potentially lethal configurations (four-way greens) and trips when there are too many alterations in too short a time. Denial of Service A denial of service attack in this context refers to stopping normal light functionality. The most obvious way to cause a loss of service is to set all lights to red. This would cause traffic congestion and considerable confusion for drivers. Alternatively, the attacker could trigger the MMU to take over by attempting an unsafe configuration. This would cause the lights to enter a safe but suboptimal state. Since this state can be triggered remotely, but cannot be reset without physical access to the controller, an adversary can disable traffic lights faster than technicians can be sent to repair them. These attacks are overt and would quickly be detected by road agency personnel, who would be left with the recourse of disabling network connections between intersections. Traffic Congestion More subtly, attacks could be made against the entire traffic infrastructure of a city which would manipulate the timings of an intersection relative to its neighbors. The effect would be that of a poorly managed road network, causing significant traffic congestion but remaining far less detectable than overt actions. This type of attack could have real financial impacts on a community. One study by the city of Boston calculated that simply reconfiguring the timings of 60 intersections in one district of the city could save $1.2 million per year in person-hours, safety, emissions, and energy costs [2]. Light Control An attacker can also control lights for personal gain. Lights could be changed to be green along the route the attacker is driving. Since these attacks are remote, this could even be done automatically as she drove, with the lights being reset to normal functionality after she passes through the intersection. More maliciously, lights could be changed to red in coordination with another attack in order to cause traffic congestion and slow emergency vehicle response. Green Lights Forever: Analyzing the Security of Traffic Infrastructure [Branden Ghena, William Beyer, Allen Hillaker, Jonathan Pevarnek, and J. Alex Halderman/Usenix]


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

JETNET LLC, the leading provider of corporate aviation information, has announced that it will host its 7th annual JETNET iQ Global Business Aviation Summit in New York City on September 5-6, 2017. The JETNET iQ Summit brings together titans of the business aviation industry—in fields as diverse as finance, manufacturing, supply, and data analysis—along with sales and marketing executives who seek an unvarnished take on the current state and future direction of aviation. This year’s Summit will feature a workshop and opening reception on Tuesday, September 5, followed by an all-day program featuring industry speakers and panelists on Wednesday, September 6, at The Westin New York at Times Square, 270 West 43rd St., New York City. For the convenience of participants, the Summit will once again coincide with the NBAA Regional Forum, to be held at Morristown Airport (MMU) in Morristown, NJ on Thursday, September 7, 2017. “Our venue and timing make this the perfect event for aviation’s thought leaders to gather,” said Paul Cardarelli, JETNET Vice President of Sales. “We’ll be sharing our latest JETNET iQ research insights, and industry leaders will provide their intelligence and predictions from many perspectives. Together, they inform business aviation’s most compelling single event.” JETNET iQ provides independent quarterly intelligence for the business aviation industry, including economic and industry analyses, aircraft owner/operator survey results, and delivery and fleet forecasts. JETNET iQ recently published its 24th quarterly report. The foundation of JETNET iQ is a proprietary survey database with information from more than 12,000 owner/operator respondents from 129 countries, the largest on-going research of customer sentiment available in the business aviation industry. “For three years in a row, our forecasts have proven to be 99.6% accurate, the best in the aviation industry,” said Rolland Vincent, Creator/Director of JETNET iQ. “Our participants tell us they look forward to hearing our predictions, and subscribe to our regular reports once they see how well we map out the coming year. It makes our Summit that much more impactful.” Since 1988, JETNET has delivered the most comprehensive and reliable business aircraft research to its exclusive clientele of aviation professionals worldwide. JETNET is the ultimate source for information and intelligence on the worldwide business, commercial, and helicopter aircraft fleet and marketplace, comprised of some 100,000 airframes. Headquartered in its state-of-the-art facility in Utica, NY, JETNET offers comprehensive user-friendly aircraft data via real-time internet access or regular updates.

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