Gifu-shi, Japan
Gifu-shi, Japan

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Poore G.C.B.,Khan Research Laboratories | Poore G.C.B.,American University of Washington | Ahyong S.T.,College St | Ahyong S.T.,University of New South Wales | And 24 more authors.
Crustaceana | Year: 2014

The names Gebiidea and Axiidea, erected by de Saint Laurent (1979), have priority over others for the two infraorders of shrimps previously included in Thalassinidea. Importantly, Thalassinidea are not monophyletic and the name should be replaced. Gebiidea and Axiidea, besides having priority and describing two monophyletic taxa, are now in common use (130 citations) and are more stable than alternative schemes proposed by Sakai (2005 and later). The history of the names of higher taxa applied to these groups is reviewed, and all family-group taxa listed. © Copyright 2014 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands.


Ando Y.,Mizunami Fossil Museum | Kawano S.,Tochigi Prefectural Museum | Ugai H.,Goshoura Cretaceous Museum
Neues Jahrbuch fur Geologie und Palaontologie - Abhandlungen | Year: 2015

Stomatopod mandibles and raptorial claws and fourteen species of decapods including Paradorippe sp. cf. P. granulata (de Haan, 1841), Hiplyra platycheir (de Haan, 1841), Myra sp. cf. M. celeries Galil, 2001, Halimede fragifer (de Haan, 1835), Eucrate crenata (de Haan, 1835) and Entricoplax vestita (de Haan, 1833) are described from the upper Pleistocene Ogushi Formation in Amakusa City, Kumamoto Prefecture, Kyushu, Japan. Alpheidae gen. et sp. indet. is abundant and Eucrate crenata and Entricoplax vestita are common in the decapod fauna of the Ogushi Formation. The occurrence of these species suggests that the Ogushi Formation was deposited as muddy bottom sediment in shallow marine water. Euplax leptophthalmus H. Milne edwards, 1852, a rare macrophthalmine crab is first reported as a fossil from Kyushu. © 2015 E. Schweizerbart'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, Stuttgart, Germany.


Klompmaker A.A.,University of Florida | Karasawa H.,Mizunami Fossil Museum | Portell R.W.,University of Florida | Fraaije R.H.B.,Oertijdmuseum de Groene Poort | Ando Y.,Mizunami Fossil Museum
Palaios | Year: 2013

Predators of extant decapod crustaceans are fairly well known, but unlike many other invertebrate clades, not much is known regarding predation evidence found on fossil decapods. Herein, we provide an overview of such predation and expand upon this through an extensive study of fossil decapod specimens from multiple museum collections. Thus far most examples of predation come from drill holes and stomach contents; bite marks, incisions or irregular holes, and possible regurgitated material are also known. The currently recognized predators of decapods in the fossil record are fish, plesiosaurs, ammonites, octopods, and gastropods. We also provide new evidence of unambiguous drill-hole predation in decapods, based on 33,593 nonmoldic Cenozoic (middle Eocene-Holocene) decapod remains originating from Europe, Asia, and North America, indicating that drilling predation in decapods is more common than currently recognized. Drill holes attributed to octopods (ichnotaxon Oichnus ovalis) and gastropods (O. simplex and O. paraboloides) were found in carapaces and appendages from the Pliocene of the Netherlands, the Pleistocene and Pliocene of the United States (Florida), and the Pleistocene and early Miocene of Japan. Six drill holes attributed to octopods were found in epifaunal and semiburrowing crabs; three drill holes attributed to gastropods were discovered in semiburrowing and epifaunal crabs, and in a burrowing mud shrimp; and the producer of two other drill holes in epifaunal crabs is unknown. Other possible drill holes occur in decapods from the Holocene and early Miocene of Japan and the late Eocene of the United States. Drill-hole predation intensities in decapod faunas by stratigraphic formation are low (≤2.7%), at least in part due to multiple biases such as preservation and molting. © 2013, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).


Feldmann R.M.,Kent State University | Schweitzer C.E.,Kent State University | Schweigert G.,Staatliches Museum fur Naturkunde | Robins C.,Kent State University | And 3 more authors.
Neues Jahrbuch fur Geologie und Palaontologie - Abhandlungen | Year: 2016

Recognition of remains of sterna, pleons, and pereiopods of Aulavescus paintenensis n. sp. (Munidopsidae) and Goniodromites serratus BEURLEN, 1929, from the Late Jurassic Solnhofentype lagerstätten in Bavaria, Germany, provides the first description of these structures in Jurassic Munidopsidae and Goniodromitidae. Addition of these morphological characters to Goniodromitidae and cladistic analysis secured the position of the family within Homolodromioidea and Dromiacea. © 2016 E. Schweizerbart'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, Stuttgart, Germany.


Karasawa H.,Mizunami Fossil Museum | Schweitzer C.E.,Kent State University | Feldmann R.M.,Kent State University | Luque J.,University of Alberta | Luque J.,Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Journal of Crustacean Biology | Year: 2014

Phylogenetic analysis of most genera within fossil and extant Raninoida (Brachyura) based on 72 adult morphological characters yielded a new superfamily and family level classification for the section. The section was most diverse at the family level during the Late Cretaceous but remains diverse at the genus and species level in the Holocene. New subfamilies include Bicornisranininae, Macroacaeninae, and Rogueinae within Lyreididae. New genera include Colombicarcinus, Alessandranina, Claudioranina, Giulianolyreidus and Italianira, and one new species, Colombicarcinus laevis, is described. New combinations include Alessandranina ornata (Wright and Collins, 1972), Claudioranina oblonga (Beschin, Busulini, de Angeli, and Tessier, 1988), Heus manningi (Bishop and Williams, 2000), Italianira punctulata (Beschin, Busulini, de Angeli, and Tessier, 1988), Giulianolyreidus bidentatus (Rathbun, 1935a), G. johnsoni (Rathbun, 1935a), Lyreidus teodorii (van Bakel et al., 2012), Macroacaena tridens (Roberts, 1962), M. teshimai (Fujiyama and Takeda, 1980), M. yanini (Ilyin and Alekseev, 1998) and Quasilaeviranina eocenica (Rathbun, 1935a). © The Crustacean Society, 2014. Published by Brill NV, Leiden.


Schweitzer C.E.,Kent State University | Karasawa H.,Mizunami Fossil Museum | Luque J.,University of Alberta | Luque J.,Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute | Feldmann R.M.,Kent State University
Journal of Crustacean Biology | Year: 2016

Phylogenetic analysis of most species within Necrocarcinoidea based upon 55 adult morphological characters supports the inclusion of 5 families within the superfamily. Two new genera are recognized within Necrocarcinidae, Arcticocarcinus n. gen. and Elektrocarcinus n. gen., and numerous new combinations have resulted. Necrocarcinoidea exhibited diversity peaks in the Albian (Early Cretaceous) and Campanian (Late Cretaceous), and displayed niche partitioning at the family level. Most Paleogene occurrences of Necrocarcinoidea are in carbonate rocks of Northern Europe. © 2016 by The Crustacean Society. Published by Brill NV, Leiden.


Ando Y.,Mizunami Fossil Museum | Kishimoto S.,3 65 3 Komatsu cho | Kawano S.,Tochigi Prefectural Museum
Neues Jahrbuch fur Geologie und Palaontologie - Abhandlungen | Year: 2016

Thalassina tsuyamensis ANDO & KISHIMOTO n. sp. is described from the lower to middle Miocene Yoshino Formation of the Katsuta Group in the Okayama Prefecture, Japan. This species is similar to the extant T. saetichelis SAKAI & TÜRKAY, 2012, but differs in having a lateral subdorsal carina on the dorsal border of the propodus with tubercles extending posterior to the anterior part of pereiopod 1. Thalassina yamato ANDO & KISHIMOTO n. sp. is described from the middle Miocene Kawachi Formation of the Kukinaga Group in the Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. This new species is closest to the extant T. squamifera DE MAN, 1915. However, it differs from T. squamifera in having a lateral dorsal carina on the dorsal border of the propodus of pereiopod 1 extending to only one- Third length and an unarmed dorsal border of the merus of pereiopods 3 to 5. © 2016 E. Schweizerbart'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, Stuttgart, Germany.


Karasawa H.,Mizunami Fossil Museum | Schweitzer C.E.,Kent State University | Feldmann R.M.,Kent State University
Journal of Crustacean Biology | Year: 2011

A phylogenetic analysis based upon 30 extinct and extant taxa of podotrematous brachyuran decapods using 74 characters shows that Podotremata sensu Guinot, 1977 is not monophyletic and results in a new classification for these crabs. Four new taxa are recognized at the section-level (Homoloida, Torynommoida, Etyoida, and Dakoticancroida) as well as two new families (Basinotopidae and Xandarocarcinidae). Dromiacea as historically defined is redefined herein to exclude Homoloidea. New generic names Noetlingocarcinus and Xandarocarcinus, and Seorsus millerae new combination also resulted from the work. © The Crustacean Society.


Karasawa H.,Mizunami Fossil Museum | Schweitzer C.E.,Kent State University | Feldmann R.M.,Kent State University
Journal of Crustacean Biology | Year: 2013

A phylogenetic analysis including representatives from 44 extinct and 27 extant families of lobsters (Polychelida, Achelata, Glypheidea, and Astacidea), resulted in the recognition of one new superfamily, Glaessnericarioidea, and three new families, Glaessnericariidae, Neoglypheidae, and Litogastroidae. Two families, Protastacidae and Stenochiridae, are elevated to superfamily status. A new classification of Glypheidea is proposed and currently known genera are rearranged based upon the phylogenetic analysis. Palaeopalaemonida is given a separate infraordinal status. Diagnoses for all infraorders, superfamilies, and families are provided. © The Crustacean Society, 2013. Published by Brill NV, Leiden.


Upogebia hibiki sp. nov. (Gebiidea: Upogebiidae) is described from the Oligocene of northern Kyushu, Japan. The new species closely resembles U. mizunamiensis Karasawa 1989, but differs in having an arched ridge on the dorso-distal mesial surface of the palm of pereiopod 1. Additionally, the new species has a triangular rostrum and a narrow gastric region. The specimens are associated with fossil burrows assigned to the ichnogenus Psilonichnus Fürsich, 1981. Therefore, Psilonichnus described herein is thought to be formed by U. hibiki sp. nov. Copyright © 2010 Magnolia Press.

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